Ruth Orkin

But Orkin's specialty not only encompassed the urban but also the personal. This is evident in her unique eye that enabled her street scenes to consistently offer penetrating insights into the time and personality of her subjects.

Ruth Orkin

Classic portraits, New York scenes and more from the brilliant and indefatigable American photographer American photographer Ruth Orkin earned acclaim for her work as she combined her love for travel and her experience growing up in Hollywood into a practice that captured the cinematic elements of everyday life and revealed the humanity of the upper crust. The atmospheric photographs taken by Orkin in cities such as Florence, New York and London still shape the image of these metropolises today: her street scenes consistently offer penetrating insights into the personality of her human subjects as well as their environments. This unique quality also manifests in her celebrity portraits of figures such as Albert Einstein, Marlon Brando, Tennessee Williams and Lauren Bacall: though clearly posed, these photographs offer a certain level of candor that allows the viewer to connect with the sitters on a human level. She also pursued filmmaking with two successful features, Little Fugitive (1953) and Lovers and Lollipops (1955)--and she did all of this as one of the few female practitioners in the field. Published on the occasion of what would have been the photographer's 100th birthday, this illustrated volume celebrates Orkin's life and career with an equally extensive and fascinating overview of this exceptional artist's oeuvre. Ruth Orkin (1921-85) studied at Los Angeles City College. Working as a freelance photographer, she published in magazines such as Life, Look and Ladies' Home Journal. She was awarded an Oscar for the film Little Fugitive, which she made with her husband in 1953. A World Through My Window (1978) is her best-known book of photographs.

Notable American Women

Bibliography : Ruth Orkin's autobiographical A Photo JourNew York City was Ruth Orkin's base during nal ( 1981 ) offers an overview of her career . Miles Barth's this time , and she is remembered as a preeminent Ruth Orkin : A ...

Notable American Women

Entries on almost five hundred women representing a wide range of fields of endeavor are featured in a collection of biographical essays that integrate each woman's personal life with her professional achievements, set in the context of historical develop

Ruth Orkin

Above and Beyond : December 9, 1999-January 22, 2000, Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York Ruth Orkin, Patricia Bosworth. ummu Project Coordinator : Margit Erb Designer : Service Station , New York Printer : Meridian Printing ...

Ruth Orkin

This book collects the black and white, New York photographs by distinguished photojournalist and filmmaker Ruth Orkin (1921-1985). Orkin was a frequent contributor to Look and Life magazines who told the stories of Manhattan life with both compassionate and dramatic images. Her numerous and now iconic photographs of celebrations, quiet moments, children at play, and the city streets have become defining images in the history of New York photography. Orkin was born in 1921 in Boston and grew up in Los Angeles before moving to New York in 1943, where she lived and worked for most of her life. Her work is in the collections of most major American museums including the Amon Carter Museum. Fort Worth; the Center for Creative Photography, Tucson; the International Center of Photography, New York; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Milwaukee Museum of Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Museum of Modern Art, New York; New Orleans Museum of Art; Santa Barbara Museum of Art; and the St.Louis Art Museum.

Ruth Orkin

Ruth Orkin


Ruth Orkin

Ruth Orkin


Keep Em in the East

Ruth Orkin Scrapbook #1, Margaret Herrick Library. Italics in this quote represent words underlined by Ruth Orkin. 108. “Inside Stuff—Pictures,” VAR, June 23, 1954, 16. 109. On the same commentary track, Engel notes that the drowning ...

   Keep    Em in the East

The year 1955 was a watershed one for New York’s film industry: Elia Kazan’s On the Waterfront took home eight Oscars, and, more quietly, Stanley Kubrick released the low-budget classic Killer’s Kiss. A wave of films that changed how American movies were made soon followed, led by directors such as Sidney Lumet, William Friedkin, Francis Ford Coppola, and Martin Scorsese. Yet this resurgence could not have occurred without a deeply rooted tradition of local film production. Richard Koszarski chronicles the compelling and often surprising origins of New York’s postwar film renaissance, looking beyond such classics as Naked City, Kiss of Death, and Portrait of Jennie. He examines the social, cultural, and economic forces that shaped New York filmmaking, from city politics to union regulations, and shows how decades of low-budget independent production taught local filmmakers how to capture the city’s grit, liveliness, and allure. He reveals the importance of “race films”—all-Black productions intended for segregated African American audiences—that not only helped keep the film business afloat but also nurtured a core group of writers, directors, designers, and technicians. Detailed production histories of On the Waterfront and Killer’s Kiss—films that appear here in a completely new light—illustrate the distinctive characteristics of New York cinema. Drawing on a vast array of research—including studio libraries, censorship records, union archives, and interviews with participants—“Keep ’Em in the East” rewrites a crucial chapter in the history of American cinema.

America s Film Legacy

Credits: Written and directed by Ray Ashley, Morris Engel, Ruth Orkin. Screen play by Ray Ashley. Produced by Ray Ashley, Morris Engel. Pho- tographed by Morris Engel. Music composed and performed by Eddy Manson. Edited by Ruth Orkin ...

America s Film Legacy

America's Film Legacy is a guide to the most significant films ever made in the United States. Unlike opinionated "Top 100" and arbitrary "Best of" lists, these are the real thing: groundbreaking films that make up the backbone of American cinema. Some are well-known, such as Citizen Kane, The Jazz Singer, All Quiet on the Western Front, The Birth of a Nation, and Boyz n the Hood. Others are more obscure, such as Blacksmith Scene, The Blue Bird, The Docks of New York, Star Theatre, and A Bronx Morning. Daniel Eagan's beautifully written and authoritative book is for anyone who loves American movies and who wants to learn more about them.

Eight Girls Taking Pictures

Mary Engel is an award-Winning filmmaker and the director of the Ruth Orkin Photo Archive. She is also the daughter of Ruth Orkin, one of America's most famous female photographers. Orkin is the artist Who inspired the Miri Marx ...

Eight Girls Taking Pictures

A sweeping tale inspired by the lives of famous 20th-century female photographers traces the progression of feminism and photography in various world regions as each woman explores private and public goals while balancing the demands of family and creativity. 60,000 first printing.

The Photographic Art Market

PHOTOGRAPHER TITLE OR DESCRIPTION DATEJAH LOT # PT SIZE NP DATES S S S S S S S S CP S S S CP CP CP CP CP S CC MP Orkin , Ruth Orkin , Ruth Orkin , Ruth Orkin , Ruth Orkin , Ruth Orkin , Ruth Orkin , Ruth Orkin , Ruth Orkin , Ruth Orkin ...

The Photographic Art Market


Ruth Orkin Calendar

Ruth Orkin Calendar


Ruth Orkin

Ruth Orkin


My Life in 100 Objects

“American Girl in Italy” by Ruth Orkin, 1951 THIS ICONIC PHOTOGRAPH became an object in my life when I glued a postcard-sized copy to a piece of plywood and propped it on my writing desk. I have read the story of how this photograph was ...

My Life in 100 Objects

Traces the remarkable life of a feminist poet through the items and images that have have defined her experiences My Life in 100 Objects is a personal reflection on the events and moments that shaped the life and work of one extraordinary woman. With a masterful, poetic voice, Margaret Randall uses talismanic objects and photographs as launching points for her nonlinear narrative. Through each “object,” Randall uncovers another part of herself, starting in a museum in Amman, Jordan, and ending in the Latin American Studies Association in Boston. Interwoven throughout are her most precious relationships, her growth as an artist, and her brave, revolutionary spirit. As Randall’s adventures often coincide with important moments in history, many of her objects provide a transcontinental glimpse into social upheavals and transitions. She shares memories from her years in Cuba (1969 to 1980) and Nicaragua (1980 to 1984), as well as briefer periods in North Vietnam (immediately preceding the end of the war in 1975), and Peru (during the government of Velasco Alvarado). In her introduction, Randall states, “objects and places have always been alive to me.” Her history too is alive, as much of a means to consider our own present as it is to glimpse her vibrant past.

Flaneuse

Used with permission of Magnum Photos Ruth Orkin, American Girl in Italy, Florence, 1951 & 1952, 1980 Ruth Orkin & Ruth Orkin Photo Archive. Used with permission of Orkin/Engel Film and Photo Archive BIBLIOGRAPHY Angier, Carole.

Flaneuse

*Shortlisted for the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay* Selected as a Book of the Year 2016 by the Financial Times, Guardian, New Statesman, Observer, The Millions and Emerald Street 'Flâneuse [flanne-euhze], noun, from the French. Feminine form of flâneur [flanne-euhr], an idler, a dawdling observer, usually found in cities. That is an imaginary definition.' If the word flâneur conjures up visions of Baudelaire, boulevards and bohemia – then what exactly is a flâneuse? In this gloriously provocative and celebratory book, Lauren Elkin defines her as ‘a determined resourceful woman keenly attuned to the creative potential of the city, and the liberating possibilities of a good walk’. Part cultural meander, part memoir, Flâneuse traces the relationship between the city and creativity through a journey that begins in New York and moves us to Paris, via Venice, Tokyo and London, exploring along the way the paths taken by the flâneuses who have lived and walked in those cities. From nineteenth-century novelist George Sand to artist Sophie Calle, from war correspondent Martha Gellhorn to film-maker Agnes Varda, Flâneuse considers what is at stake when a certain kind of light-footed woman encounters the city and changes her life, one step at a time.

Working the Room

Ruth. Orkin's. 'VE. Day'. Photographs depict a moment but they can contain years, decades. Few, however, are as saturated with history as Ruth Orkin's picture of the crowd gathered in Times Square on VE Day, 8 May 1945.

Working the Room

Alive with insight, wit and Dyer's characteristic irreverence, this collection of essays offers a guide around the cultural maze, mapping a route through the worlds of literature, art, photography and music. Besides exploring what it is that makes great art great, Working the Room ventures into more personal territory with extensive autobiographical pieces - 'On Being an Only Child', 'Sacked' and 'Reader's Block', among other gems. Dyer's breadth of vision and generosity of spirit combine to form a manual for ways of being in - and seeing - the world today.

Letters from a Life Volume 3 1946 1951

... 1946: Benjamin Britten and Serge Koussevitzky © Ruth Orkin 27 Tanglewood, 1946: Britten and W. H. Auden © Ruth Orkin 28 Tanglewood, 1946: Peter Grimes – the curtain call © Ruth Orkin 29 On the Meare at Thorpeness, Suffolk, ...

Letters from a Life Volume 3  1946 1951

The third volume of the annotated selected letters of composer Benjamin Britten covers the years 1946-51, during which he wrote many of his best-known works, founded and developed the English Opera Group and the Aldeburgh Festival, and toured widely in Europe and the United States as a pianist and conductor. Correspondents include librettists Ronald Duncan (The Rape of Lucretia), Eric Crozier (Albert Herring, Saint Nicolas, The Little Sweep) and E. M. Forster (Billy Budd); conductor Ernest Ansermet and composer Lennox Berkeley; publishers Ralph Hawkes and Erwin Stein of Boosey & Hawkes; and the celebrated tenor Peter Pears, Britten's partner. Among friends in the United States are Christopher Isherwood, Elizabeth Mayer and Aaron Copland, and there is a significant meeting with Igor Stravinsky. This often startling and innovative period is vividly evoked by the comprehensive and scholarly annotations, which offer a wide range of detailed information fascinating for both the Britten specialist and the general reader. Donald Mitchell contributes a challenging introduction exploring the interaction of life and work in Britten's creativity, and an essay examining for the first time, through their correspondence, the complex relationship between the composer and the writer Edward Sackville-West.

Cinematic Quests for Identity

Little Fugitive (1953, B&W) Directed by: Ray Ashley, Morris Engel, and Ruth Orkin Written by: Ray Ashley, Morris Engel, and Ruth Orkin Producers: Ray Ashley, Morris Engel Cinematographer: Morris Engel; Editors: Ruth Orkin, Lester Troob; ...

Cinematic Quests for Identity

This book examines the narrative and cinematic conventions of movies that are about the quest for identity and individuation. Chapters are devoted to individual films, such as La Belle et la Bête, The Silence of the Lambs, The Searchers, The Deer Hunter, and The Picture of Dorian Gray, as well as considerations of films directed by Catherine Breillat and Robert Bresson.

Bazin on Global Cinema 1948 1958

... Akitake Kōno (Shibaura), Sanae Nakahara (Natsu) The Little Fugitive (1953) Director: Ray Ashley, Morris Engel, and Ruth Orkin Screenplay: Ray Ashley, Morris Engel, and Ruth Orkin Cinematographer: Morris Engel Editors: Ruth Orkin, ...

Bazin on Global Cinema  1948 1958

André Bazin is renowned for almost single-handedly establishing the study of film as an accepted intellectual pursuit, as well as for being the spiritual father of the French New Wave. In 1951 he cofounded and became editor-in-chief of Cahiers du cinéma, the most influential critical periodical in the history of cinema. Four of the film critics whom he mentored at the magazine later became the most acclaimed directors of the postwar French cinema—François Truffaut, Jean-Luc Godard, Jacques Rivette, and Claude Chabrol. Bazin is also considered the principal instigator of the influential auteur theory—the idea that, since film is an art form, the director of a movie must be perceived as the chief creator of its unique cinematic style. Bazin wrote some 2,600 articles and reviews, only about 150 of which are accessible in anthologies or edited collections. Bazin on Global Cinema, 1948–1958 offers English-language readers much of his writing on Asian cinema; previously untranslated essays on James Dean, the star system, political engagement and the cinema, and film criticism itself; and several reviews of film books, as well as reviews of notable American, British, and European movies, such as Johnny Guitar, High Noon, Umberto D., Hamlet, Kanal, and Le jour se lève (Daybreak). The book also features a contextual introduction to Bazin’s life and work, the first comprehensive bibliography of works by and about Bazin, credits of all the films he discusses in this book, and an extensive index.

The Zoo and Screen Media

Lury, Karen (2010), The Child in Film: Tears, Fears and Fairy Tales (New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press) Morris, Gary (1999), 'Poets of Everyday Life: Morris Engel and Ruth Orkin', Bright Lights Film Journal, 1 November, ...

The Zoo and Screen Media

This book is the first critical anthology to examine the controversial history of the zoo by focusing on its close relationship with screen media histories and technologies. Individual chapters address the representation of zoological spaces in classical and contemporary Hollywood cinema, documentary and animation, amateur and avant-garde film, popular television and online media. The Zoo and Screen Media: Images of Exhibition and Encounter provides a new map of twentieth-century human-animal relations by exploring how the zoo, that modern apparatus for presenting living animals to human audiences, has itself been represented across a diverse range of moving image media.