American Sacred Space

American Sacred Space

In a series of pioneering studies, this book examines the creation—and the conflict behind the creation—of sacred space in America. The essays in this volume visit places in America where economic, political, and social forces clash over the sacred and the profane, from wilderness areas in the American West to the Mall in Washington, D.C., and they investigate visions of America as sacred space at home and abroad. Here are the beginnings of a new American religious history—told as the story of the contested spaces it has inhabited. The contributors are David Chidester, Matthew Glass, Edward T. Linenthal, Colleen McDannell, Robert S. Michaelsen, Rowland A. Sherrill, and Bron Taylor.

Searching for Sacred Space

Essays on Architecture and Liturgical Design in the Episcopal Church

Searching for Sacred Space

Every Sunday we walk through those (probably red) doors and enter a sacred space. It is familiar . . . maybe comforting . . . maybe not . . . maybe downright uncomfortable and unwelcoming. In twelve thoughtful and provocative essays, the writers ask important questions about the relationship between sacred spaces and the worship that takes place in them: -How do our buildings convey a vision of God's kingdom on earth? -How are our places of worship reflecting our beliefs? -In what visible, tangible forms are we proclaiming a faith in the living God? -How are our church buildings helping this church bring the Gospel into a new century?

Sacred Space in Early Modern Europe

Sacred Space in Early Modern Europe

In this 2005 book, leading historians examine sanctity and sacred space in Europe during and after the religious upheavals of the early modern period.

Sacred Space, Sacred Thread

Perspectives across Time and Traditions

Sacred Space, Sacred Thread

The insightful studies contained in this book will be of significant value to anyone interested in experiencing more deeply the intersections between materiality and spirituality. Part 1 introduces readers into Egyptian, Israelite, Christian, and Hindu temples, shrines, or sanctuaries. Part 2 helps readers understand how items of colored fabrics, clothing, robes, and veils, convey ritual meanings. Part 3 reports two panel discussions that exemplify the pathway of fruitful conversation. Matter and spirit might seem to some to be polar opposites. But as these studies by distinguished and diverse scholars demonstrate, spiritual experiences are constructively defined and refined within the coordinates of place and time. Sacred space, as well as sacred cloth, define borders, but not necessarily boundaries, between the sacred and the profane. These material coordinates physically enclose and also spiritually disclose. They both symbolize and synergize, as they encompass and expansively inspire. These original and enjoyable presentations will help all readers to hold tenaciously to the tenets and also the tensions inherent in physical spiritual experiences.

Sacred Space

Sacred Space


The Framing of Sacred Space

The Canopy and the Byzantine Church (Ca. 300-1500)

The Framing of Sacred Space

The Framing of Sacred Space offers the first topical study of canopies as essential spatial and symbolic units in Byzantine-rite churches. Centrally planned columnar structures--typically comprised of four columns and a roof--canopies had a critical role in the modular processes of church design, from actual church furnishings in the shape of a canopy to the church's structural core. As architectonic objects of basic structural and design integrity, canopies integrate an archetypical image of architecture and provide means for an innovative understanding of the materialization of the idea of the Byzantine church and its multi-focal spatial presence. The Framing of Sacred Space considers both the material and conceptual framing of sacred space and explains how the canopy bridges the physical and transcendental realms. As a crucial element of church design in the Byzantine world, a world that gradually abandoned the basilica as a typical building of Roman imperial secular architecture, the canopy carried tectonic and theological meanings and, through vaulted, canopied bays and recognizable Byzantine domed churches, established organic architectural, symbolic, and sacred ties between the Old and New Covenants. In such an overarching context, the canopy becomes an architectural parti, a vital concept and dynamic design principle that carries the essence of the Byzantine church. The Framing of Sacred Space highlights significant factors in understanding canopies through specific architectural settings and the Byzantine concepts of space, thus also contributing to larger debates about the creation of sacred space and related architectural taxonomy.

Cultivating Sacred Space

Gardening for the Soul

Cultivating Sacred Space

Linda Greenlaw hadn't been blue-water fishing for ten years, since the great events chronicled in The Perfect Storm and The Hungry Ocean, when an old friend offered her the captaincy on his boat, Seahawk, for a season of swordfishing. She took the bait, of course, and thus opened a new chapter in a life that had already seen enough adventure for three lifetimes.The Seahawk turns out to be the rustiest of buckets, with sprung, busted, and ancient equipment guaranteed to fail at any critical moment. Life is never dull out on the Grand Banks, and no one is better at capturing the flavor and details of the wild ride that is swordfishing, from the technical complexities of longline fishing and the nuances of reading the weather and waves to the sheer beauty of the open water. The trip is full of surprises, "a bit hardier and saltier than I had hoped for," but none more unexpected than when the boat's lines inadvertently drift across the Canadian border and she lands in jail. Seaworthy is about nature -- human and other; about learning what you can control and what you do when fate takes matters out of your control. It's about how a middle-aged woman who sets a high bar for herself copes with challenge and change and frustration, about the struggle to succeed or fail on your own terms, and above all, about learning how to find your true self when you're caught between land and sea.

Sacred Space

Creating Personal Alters and Shrines for Your Home

Sacred Space

In this remarkable new book, Beverley Jollands shows you how to creat beautiful alters and shrines that have special individual significance, and which will inspire you to channel your innermost thought and desires into coherent forms of expression.

Sacred Power, Sacred Space

An Introduction to Christian Architecture and Worship

Sacred Power, Sacred Space

Jeanne Halgren Kilde's survey of church architecture is unlike any other. Her main concern is not the buildings themselves, but rather the dynamic character of Christianity and how church buildings shape and influence the religion. Kilde argues that a primary function of church buildings is to represent and reify three different types of power: divine power, or ideas about God; personal empowerment as manifested in the individual's perceived relationship to the divine; and social power, meaning the relationships between groups such as clergy and laity. Each type intersects with notions of Christian creed, cult, and code, and is represented spatially and materially in church buildings. Kilde explores these categories chronologically, from the early church to the twentieth century. She considers the form, organization, and use of worship rooms; the location of churches; and the interaction between churches and the wider culture. Church buildings have been integral to Christianity, and Kilde's important study sheds new light on the way they impact all aspects of the religion. Neither mere witnesses to transformations of religious thought or nor simple backgrounds for religious practice, church buildings are, in Kilde's view, dynamic participants in religious change and goldmines of information on Christianity itself.

Yeats and the Drama of Sacred Space

Yeats and the Drama of Sacred Space

In recent years Yeats scholarship has been, to a large extent, historically-based in emphasis. Much has been gained from this emphasis, if we consider the refinement of critical awareness resulting from a better understanding of the intricate relationship between the poet and his times. However, the present author feels that an exclusive adherence to this approach impacts negatively on our ability to appreciate and understand Yeatsian creativity from within the internally located imperatives of creativity itself, as opposed to our understanding it on the basis of aesthetically constitutive socio-historical forces operative from without. He feels a need to relocate the study of Yeats in the work and thought of the poet himself, to focus again on the poet's own myth-making. To this end Nicholas Meihuizen examines this myth-making as it relates to certain archetypal figures, places, and structures. The figures in question are the antagonist and goddess, embodiments of conflict and feminine forces in Yeats, and they participate in a lively drama within the places and shapes considered sacred by the poet: places such as the Sligo district and Byzantium; shapes such as the circling gyres of his system. The book should be interesting and valuable to students and scholars of varying degrees of acquaintance with the poet. To long-time Yeatsians it offers fresh perspectives onto important works and preoccupations. To new students it offers a means of exploring wide-ranging material within a few central, interrelated frames, a means that mirrors Yeats's own commitment to unity in diversity.