The Cayo Santiago Macaques

History, Behavior, and Biology

The Cayo Santiago Macaques

This volume presents a broad spectrum of research on the Cayo Santiago macaques, a unique free-ranging colony of rhesus macaques in Puerto Rico. It includes thirteen scientific studies on the behavior and biology of the Cayo Santiago macaques, as well as a detailed history of the colony and a complete bibliography of over 260 scientific publications based on work at Cayo Santiago from 1938 through 1984. The chapters represent examples of both short- and long-term research conducted on the island over the past several years. Some are reviews, providing a synopsis of complex longitudinal studies of behavior, vocal communication, functional morphology, genetics, and population dynamics. Others document the results of opportunistic studies of behavior or biological surveys. The chapters cover a broad range of topics, but all share a common dependence on the detailed life history and genealogical data which make the Cayo Santiago macaque colony an important international research resource.

Santiago

A Novel

Santiago

A Winnipeg woman decides to make a pilgrimage from France to Spain along with a school friend and her depressed brother.

The Pilgrimage to Santiago

The Pilgrimage to Santiago

The Long Road to Heaven", the annual pilgrimage to the Galician city of Santiago de Compostela has taken place for over a thousand years. In the great cathedral of Santiago are said to lie the bones of St. James of the Great, cousin to Christ, an original disciple and later "resurrected" as the legendary slayer of the Moors. From the Middle Ages onwards, this most evocative of Christian shrines has attracted pilgrims to the Spanish city from all over Europe and further afield. A network of routes, lined with statues and other symbols, leads to Santiago, but the most celebrated is that from Paris, across the Pyrenees and through the arid uplands of northern Spain.

Walking Home on the Camino de Santiago

Walking Home on the Camino de Santiago

Walking Home is the fictionalized account of Lasswell's on-again, off-again pilgrimage on the Camino de Santiago. Sometimes surreal, sometimes poignant, often thought provoking, Walking Home invites the reader to share Lasswell's internal and external explorations as they unfold along the Way.

Santiago de Guatemala, 1541-1773

City, Caste, and the Colonial Experience

Santiago de Guatemala, 1541-1773

Santiago de Guatemala was the colonial capital and most important urban center of Spanish Central America from its establishment in 1541 until the earthquakes of 1773. Christopher H. Lutz traces the demographic and social history of the city during this period, focusing on the rise of groups of mixed descent. During these two centuries the city evolved from a segmented society of Indians, Spaniards, and African slaves to an increasingly mixed population as the formerly all-Indian barrios became home to a large intermediate group of ladinos. The history of the evolution of a multiethnic society in Santiago also sheds light on the present-day struggle of Guatemalan ladinos and Indians and the problems that continue to divide the country today.

Pilgrim Stories

On and Off the Road to Santiago, Journeys Along an Ancient Way in Modern Spain

Pilgrim Stories

Unlike the religiously-oriented pilgrims who visit Marian shrines such as Lourdes, the modern Road of St. James attracts an ecumenical mix of largely wel.

Road Of Stars To Santiago

Road Of Stars To Santiago

In the tradition of Colin Fletcher's The Man Who Walked Through Time and William Least Heat-Moon's Blue Highways, Edward F. Stanton has written a quietly beautiful and engrossing account of his own pilgrimage. Road of Stars to Santiago is a personal story of his journey along what has been called "the premier cultural route of Europe." "I undertook a five-hundred-mile walk along the ancient Camino de Santiago, from the French Pyrenees to Santiago de Compostella in northwest Spain, the supposed burial site of the apostle St. James the Elder, and beyond to Finisterre, Land's End on the Atlantic coast. "On my journey I followed the old road whenever possible, passing through mountains, medieval forests and remote villages, as well as modern towns and cities. I slept in fields, abandoned schools or wherever I could, on a thirty-day trip that brought me into contact with a whole cross-section of Spanish society, and with pilgrims from France, Belgium, Holland, Germany and England. "Most of the book has to do with my own trials and joys on the Road: the physical struggle to walk about twenty miles a day in the heat or rain, to find a place to eat and sleep; with the psychological changes that take place when one leaves home, family and routine; with the contradictions inherent to a pilgrimage in the late twentieth centuiy; with experiences that ranged from the spiritual to the picaresque; with the people I met on the way -- from shepherds and peasan ts to astrologers and philosophers. There are plenty of humorous situations and unexpected turns." -- Edward F. Stanton

Politics and Urban Growth in Santiago, Chile, 1891-1941

Politics and Urban Growth in Santiago, Chile, 1891-1941

This book describes the rapid growth of Santiago—Chile's capital and its largest and most important city—for the period 1891-1931. Based on a wide range of original research, the book describes the growth of the city, both demographically and spatially, and highlights the role of the local administration in this process.

The Camino de Santiago in the 21st Century

Interdisciplinary Perspectives and Global Views

The Camino de Santiago in the 21st Century

The Spanish Camino de Santiago, a pilgrimage rooted in the Medieval period and increasingly active today, has attracted a growing amount of both scholarly and popular attention. With its multiple points of departure in Spain and other European countries, its simultaneously secular and religious nature, and its international and transhistorical population of pilgrims, this particular pilgrimage naturally invites a wide range of intellectual inquiry and scholarly perspectives. This volume fills a gap in current pilgrimage studies, focusing on contemporary representations of the Camino de Santiago. Complementing existing studies of the Camino’s medieval origins, it situates the Camino as a modern experience and engages interdisciplinary perspectives to present a theoretical framework for exploring the most central issues that concern scholars of pilgrimage studies today. Contributors explore the contemporary meaning of the Camino through an interdisciplinary lens that reflects the increasing permeability between academic disciplines and fields, bringing together a wide range of theoretical and critical perspectives (cultural studies, literary studies, globalization studies, memory studies, ethnic studies, postcolonial studies, cultural geographies, photography, and material culture). Chapters touch on a variety of genres (blogs, film, graphic novels, historical novels, objects, and travel guides), and transnational perspectives (Australia, the Arab world, England, Spain, and the United States).