Scottish Bothy Walks

A follow-up to The Scottish Bothy Bible (50,000 copies sold) this photo travel guide this walking companion will share 28 of the best bothy experiences.

Scottish Bothy Walks

A follow-up to The Scottish Bothy Bible (50,000 copies sold) this photo travel guide this walking companion will share 28 of the best bothy experiences. Using the bothy as the reference point Geoff Allan guides the reader on a mix of day walks and multi-day adventures to his favourite bothies highlighting the incredible wildlife, geography, history and culture that you will find along your walk. Each walk contains an informative description of the route and bothy, a map highlighting the points of interest along the route and detailed route descriptions. Supported by beautiful photographs of the bothy, route and points of interest along the way.

100 Classic Coastal Walks in Scotland

It should be noted that there are two open bothies on the island, at Dibidil and Guirdil, but permission is required before using them (see the 'Getting to ...

100 Classic Coastal Walks in Scotland

Scotland and its islands encompass more than 10,000 miles of breathtaking coastline. The 100 routes outlined by Andrew Dempster take in the quaint fishing ports, long sun-bleached strands and vast golf links of the east coast; the grand Gothic cliffs, natural arches and storm-tossed seastacks that comprise much of the fractured edge of the Atlantic; the kaleidoscopic wildflower carpet of the Western Isles machair; the romantic castles and Clearance settlements of Skye; and myriad idyllic secluded beaches and breathtaking clifftop vantage points. This unique guide covers the whole spectrum, from short hour-long beach strolls to serious full-day hikes that require mountain gear and total commitment. Compiled in a user-friendly format and containing maps and illustrations throughout, 100 Classic Coastal Walks in Scotland provides a wealth of walking possibilities for anyone with an interest in outdoor pursuits, with many of the walks also suitable for children.

Great Mountain Days in Scotland

... in busy locations such as Shenavall (Walks 9 and 10) or Culra (Walk 25) probably ought to consider camping instead. Many Scottish bothies are maintained ...

Great Mountain Days in Scotland

50 great mountain walks in Scotland. Some of the routes described in this larger format book are well known classic challenges such as the Lochaber Traverse, the Mamores and Cairngorms 4000-ers while others approach a favourite mountain from a new angle or combine several in a testing way. Each one can be crammed into a single, long day or backpacked over two to spend a little longer in this rugged and addictive landscape. The collection spans Scotland, right across its magnificent upland areas and dramatic peaks. Routes range from 12 to 25 miles and many would make a good two-day adventure. Some can be approached by kayak or mountain bike. Over 270 ranges and summits feature in settings as varied as the snowbound Cairngorm plateaus and the land-sea jigsaw of the Hebrides, where rugged peaks rise from clear water. Few walking destinations are better suited to routes at the longer, tougher end of the scale.

Ben Jonson s Walk to Scotland

429.bothies: A bothy was a temporary or permanent building usedto house workmen, including buildings'near thefishings used bysalmon fishers' (DSL SND1,Bothy ...

Ben Jonson s Walk to Scotland

At the heart of this book is a previously unpublished account of Ben Jonson's celebrated walk from London to Edinburgh in the summer of 1618. This unique firsthand narrative provides us with an insight into where Jonson went, whom he met, and what he did on the way. James Loxley, Anna Groundwater and Julie Sanders present a clear, readable and fully annotated edition of the text. An introduction and a series of contextual essays shed further light on topics including the evidence of provenance and authorship, Jonson's contacts throughout Britain, his celebrity status, and the relationships between his 'foot voyage' and other famous journeys of the time. The essays also illuminate wider issues, such as early modern travel and political and cultural relations between England and Scotland. It is an invaluable volume for scholars and upper-level students of Ben Jonson studies, early modern literature, seventeenth-century social history, and cultural geography.

Leading Matters How to enjoy and lead a walk in ten easy steps

For instance, in a Scottish Bothy, the answer to all four questions is 'no'. The Bothy provides beds, walls and a roof (not always weather-proof).

Leading Matters  How to enjoy and lead a walk in ten easy steps

Let's walk! But where? How? Who with? How far? A multi-day back-packing expedition or a stroll in the park? This book covers these questions, and will take you through ten basic steps to enjoying walking/hiking/tramping/rambling. Above all, the author provides the key to successful walking -leadership. Peter Davies has led walks in Britain, France, Austria, Spain, Switzerland and New Zealand. He gives practical advice - with stories from his twenty years' experience - on achieving the pleasures of walking and avoiding (mostly) the perils.

Landscapes of the Scottish Highlands and the Isle of Skye

Shorter walk : The obvious shorter walk ( in time only ) is to return from Ryvoan Bothy back through the Ryvoan Pass . This avoids any hillwalking ( 9.5km ...

Landscapes of the Scottish Highlands and the Isle of Skye

The SUNFLOWER LANDSCAPE series takes visitors away from the tourist centres and out into the countryside, exploring by private or public transport or on foot. This volume features the Scottish Highlands and the Isle of Skye, with timetables for public transport, 2 pull-out touring maps, walking maps and colour photographs.

Scotland Highlands Islands Footprint Handbook

walks. Scotland is a walker's paradise. Whether you are looking for family strolls on the beach, ... beyond to the rustic, simple shelter of Ryvoan Bothy.

Scotland Highlands   Islands Footprint Handbook

When the rain stops falling and the mist clears there is no more beautiful place on earth than Scotland’s Highlands and Islands. Footprint’s Scotland Highlands & Islands gives you everything you need to get the most out of Europe’s last great wilderness: the loveliest glens and lochs, the spookiest places, the most evocative castles and most glorious beaches. • Great coverage of all the jaw-dropping scenery including national parks, mountains, castles, glens and lochs. • Comprehensive listings from B&Bs, bothies and baronial castles to where to enjoy a wee dram of malt whiskey • Loaded with information and suggestions on how to get off the beaten track, from puffin-spotting to horse riding • It includes fantastic mapping and inspiring color section to help you plan your way around the vibrant cities, stunning highlands and hundreds of islands. Footprint’s fully updated Scotland Highlands & Islands is packed with all the information you need to get the best out of this breathtaking region.

Scotland s Mountain Ridges

From the bothy walk back past the ugly white lodge, which looks like a 1930s semi dumped incongruously in the country's most stirring middle of nowhere.

Scotland s Mountain Ridges

A guidebook to the rich mix of summer scrambling, rock climbing and winter mountaineering on Scotland's ridges, from the remote Cairngorms to the splendour of the Cuillin. Graceful carved walkways slung between summits, twisted spines of stone - ridges can be the most beautiful of mountain landforms. With elegant lines and giddy exposure, ridge climbs emit a powerful siren call, drawing us out onto the rocks. Life on the edge has a special quality, born of the contrast of empty space all around, and intricate detail in close-up. The crests are strangely irresistible. Scotland's ridges are among the finest mountaineering lines in the country, every one a unique adventure. The variety of these routes reflects the breadth of the mountain experience: a rich mix of summer scrambles, technical rock and challenging winter climbs. This book covers both the popular classics and some obscure gems, aiming to celebrate these thrilling climbs as much as to document them. Along the way it explores landscapes of magnificent diversity, ranging from the remote desolation of the Cairngorms to the seaside splendour of the Cuillin, the great trench of Glencoe to the surreal exhibitionism of the far north. The chosen selection spans the grade range, with routes to suit all levels of ability. Whether an earthbound hillwalker or an accomplished climber, Scotland's ridges cannot fail to stir your imagination.

Scotland

Beyond the bothy the path climbs broad open slopes beside the Allt nan Fang to a boggy saddle, the highest point on the walk at 610m, between the minor top ...

Scotland

This comprehensive book is an excellent planning resource for those who wish to venture into the Scottish mountains. Whether you are planning a walk, scramble, climb or ski tour this larger format guide has all the information the independent mountain lover needs. The guide covers all the mountainous areas of Scotland from south to north, divided into seven regions. Each regional chapter covers individual glens important for mountain-goers, groups of hills that form coherent massifs and individual hills of significance. However, this is not a route guide and detailed descriptions are not provided. The aim of the book is to inspire and entertain as well as inform; to show first-time visitors just what the Scottish mountains have to offer and provide a new perspective for those who have been before. In the descriptions author Chris Townsend has given his opinions as to the relative qualities of the walks, glens, lochs, mountains and the landscape in general and highlighted those he thinks are the best the area has to offer. Includes: Descriptions of all the Scottish mountains, area-by-area from south to north, to help you identify the best locations for hill walking, mountaineering, climbing and ski touring Classic ascents and walks described, from scrambles up Ben Nevis to ski tours in the Cairngorms A planning tool for long-distance treks

Scottish Island Bagging

The Walkhighlands Guide to the Islands of Scotland Helen Webster, Paul Webster ... but has two open bothies where you can stay and which make a number of ...

Scottish Island Bagging

Scottish Island Bagging by Helen and Paul Webster, founders of Walkhighlands, is a guide to the magical islands of Scotland. Focusing on the ninety-nine islands that have regular trips or means of access for visitors, plus fifty-five other islands which have no regular transport but are still of significant size or interest, the authors have described the best ways to experience each one. Of the islands featured, many are household names – Skye, Lewis, Bute – while some, such as the isolated St Kilda archipelago and the remote Sula Sgeir, will be unknown to all but a hardcore few. When it comes to things to see and do, the islands of Scotland have it all. Wildlife enthusiasts can watch out for otters, orcas and basking sharks, while birdwatchers in particular are spoilt: look out for the rare corncrake on Islay, sea eagles on Mull, or sight puffins, gannets, storm petrels and many other seabirds on any number of islands – although beware the divebombing bonxies. Foodies can sample Arran or Westray cheese, the many islands’ world-renowned seafood or learn about the whisky making process and sample a wee dram on a distillery tour. While the human history may not stretch back in time as far as the geology of these ancient lands, it is rich and varied: visit the 5,000-year-old Neolithic village of Skara Brae on Orkney, or Mackinnon’s Cave on Mull, following in the footsteps of Samuel Johnson and James Boswell. You can even stay in the house on Jura where George Orwell wrote Nineteen Eighty-Four. Hillwalkers can bag a Munro, walk the wild clifftops or take in the sights, or you could just escape from it all on one of the dozens of beautiful and deserted beaches – before joining the locals for a ceilidh into the wee hours. Well served by ferries and other transport links, getting around is easy. You could even take the world’s shortest scheduled flight. In Scottish Island Bagging, let Helen and Paul Webster be your guides to these enchanting isles.

The Rough Guide to Scottish Highlands Islands Travel Guide eBook

There are several long-distance footpaths, such as the well-known West Highland Way, which take between three and seven days to walk, though you can, ...

The Rough Guide to Scottish Highlands   Islands  Travel Guide eBook

The Rough Guide to Scottish Highlands and Islands Make the most of your time on Earth with the ultimate travel guides. World-renowned 'tell it like it is' travel guide Discover Scottish Highlands and Islands with this comprehensive and entertaining travel guide, packed with practical information and honest recommendations by our independent experts. Whether you plan to take a boat out on a remote loch, take a whale-watching tour off the Isle of Mull or cheer on some Highland games, The Rough Guide to Scottish Highlands and Islands will help you discover the best places to explore, eat, drink, shop and sleep along the way. Features of this travel guide to Scottish Highlands and Islands: - Detailed regional coverage: provides practical information for every kind of trip, from off-the-beaten-track adventures to chilled-out breaks in popular tourist areas - Honest and independent reviews: written with Rough Guides' trademark blend of humour, honesty and expertise, our writers will help you make the most from your trip to Scottish Highlands and Islands - Meticulous mapping: practical full-colour maps, with clearly numbered, colour-coded keys. Find your way around the Western Isles, Argyll and many more locations without needing to get online - Fabulous full-colour photography: features inspirational colour photography, including royal blue waters lapping the cliffs of Shetland and the romantic West Highland Railway steaming over the Glenfinnan Viaduct. - Time-saving itineraries: carefully planned routes will help inspire and inform your on-the-road experiences - Things not to miss: Rough Guides' rundown of the best sights and top experiences to be found in the Highlands, Great Glen and Skye - Travel tips and info: packed with essential pre-departure information including getting around, accommodation, food and drink, health, the media, festivals, sports and outdoor activities, culture and etiquette, shopping and more - Background information: comprehensive 'Contexts' chapter provides fascinating insights into Scotland with coverage of history, religion, ethnic groups, environment, wildlife and books, plus a handy language section and glossary - Covers: Argyll, the central Highlands, the Great Glen, the north and northwest Highlands, Skye and the small Isles, the Western Isles, Orkney and Shetland You may also be interested in: Rough Guide to Scotland, Pocket Rough Guide Isle of Skye About Rough Guides: Rough Guides have been inspiring travellers for over 35 years, with over 30 million copies sold globally. Synonymous with practical travel tips, quality writing and a trustworthy 'tell it like it is' ethos, the Rough Guides list includes more than 260 travel guides to 120+ destinations, gift-books and phrasebooks.

Rough Guides Snapshot Scotland Glasgow

West Highland Way, which take between three and seven days to walk, though you can, of course, just do a section of them. Paths are generally well ...

Rough Guides Snapshot Scotland  Glasgow

The Rough Guide Snapshot to Glasgow is the ultimate travel guide to this dynamic part of Scotland. It leads you through the city and along the Clyde with reliable information and comprehensive coverage of all the sights and attractions, from the fascinating Kelvingrove Art Gallery and the West End's live music scene, to the distinctive architecture of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and the villages of the Clyde Valley. Detailed maps and up-to-date listings pinpoint the best cafés, restaurants, hotels, shops, bars and nightlife, ensuring you make the most of your trip, whether passing through, staying for the weekend or longer. Also included is the Basics section from The Rough Guide to Scotland, with all the practical information you need for travelling in and around Scotland, including transport, food, drink, costs, events and spectator sports. Also published as part of The Rough Guide to Scotland. Now available in ePub format.

A Walk by the Sea

we eventually met up at what seemed to be the most remote bothy in Scotland. The Scottish legs were harsh and unforgiving and Knoydart would have been ...

A Walk by the Sea

“The British coast is where journeys begin and where journeys end, where sun rises and where sun sets.” In John Chatterton’s A Walk by the Sea, John tells the story of his journey from Land’s End to circumnavigate an island with a longer coastline than France or India with an infinite variety of landscapes, seascapes and cultures. After having always wanted to walk the coastline of Great Britain and returning to normality after the foot and mouth epidemic was declared over in 2001, John started his epic journey around Great Britain. He quickly realised that this was not just a walk, and this book is certainly not a walker’s handy guidebook to the periphery of Blake’s ‘green and pleasant land,’ but something much deeper and meaningful. For John, walking gets the most out of travel, but this was a ‘journey’ not a walk. The journey is a reflection of Britain in the first millennium of the 21st century - its events its places and its people. Walking, unlike other forms of travel, allows time for expansion of thoughts and ideas, and reflections on life and times. This journey uses Britain as a backdrop to explore philosophical, social, political, geographical and cultural issues that spring to mind on the way. Although these thoughts and ideas are physically separate from the journey, John explains how they are also a deeply intrinsic part of it too. “A Walk by the Sea is much more than a usual guidebook but, instead, is a psycho-geographical journey around the Great British coastline in thefirst decade of the new millennium,” comments John.

Scottish Roots

... 1 PBK £ 6.99 WALK WITH LUATH Mountain Days & Bothy Nights Dave Brown and lan Mitchell ISBN O 946487 15 4 PBK £ 7.50 The Joy of Hillwalking Ralph Storer ...

Scottish Roots

This new and updated edition of the guide includes information on how to access family data utilising electronic resources and the Internet - a must if conducting research from an overseas base - and is a very welcome addition to the family library.

Mountain Days and Bothy Nights

Acknowledged as a classic of mountain writing, this book takes you into the bothies, howffs and dosses on the Scottish hills as Fishgut Mac, Desperate Dan and Stumpy the Big Yin stalk hill and public house, evading gamekeepers and Royalty.

Mountain Days and Bothy Nights

Acknowledged as a classic of mountain writing, this book takes you into the bothies, howffs and dosses on the Scottish hills as Fishgut Mac, Desperate Dan and Stumpy the Big Yin stalk hill and public house, evading gamekeepers and Royalty.

Edinburgh Rough Guides Snapshot Scotland

... look out for guided walks offered by rangers at many National Trust for Scotland, ... Mountain Bothies Association mountainbothies.org.uk.

Edinburgh  Rough Guides Snapshot Scotland

The Rough Guides Snapshot Scotland: Edinburgh is the ultimate travel guide to the capital of Scotland. It leads you through the city with reliable information and comprehensive coverage of all the sights and attractions, from Arthur's Seat to Edinburgh Castle. Detailed maps and up-to-date listings pinpoint the best cafés, restaurants, hotels, shops, bars and nightlife - plus a guide to the Edinburgh Festival - ensuring you make the most of your trip, whether passing through, staying for the weekend or longer. The Rough Guides Snapshot Scotland: Edinburgh also covers the top places to visit outside the centre, including East Lothian, Midlothian and West Lothian. Also included is the Basics section from the Rough Guide to Scotland, with all the practical information you need for travelling in and around Edinburgh, including transport, food, drink, accommodation, outdoor activities and costs. Also published as part of the Rough Guide to Scotland. The Rough Guides Snapshot Scotland: Edinburgh is equivalent to 86 printed pages.

Hamish s Mountain Walk

The first non-stop round of all the 3000ft Scottish Munros Hamish Brown. vivid yellow light and towering black clouds. The bothy stands by a lonely bay, ...

Hamish s Mountain Walk

Hamish Brown's account of his epic walk has been the inspiration for generations of hillwalkers. Sandstone Press is proud to present, not a mere reprint, but a complete reimagining of the book in a modern font, with a new introduction and appendix, and a new, extended colour plate section all provided by Hamish Brown. This will be a book that every lover of the Scottish hills, and everyone who has been touched by the spirit of the outdoors will want to read and reread

Western Highlands of Scotland

Locality 4.12 Enard Bay Walk up the road from the car park and go left at the bend ... Walk down to the shore in the bay of Camas a' Bhothain (Gaelic: bothy ...

Western Highlands of Scotland

This guide is for those who wish to understand the interplay between rocks and scenery in a truly classic geology in Europe. Nowhere else in Britain is this link to be more clearly observed. Key geological localities that make the Scottish Highlands a unique region for the study of geology are linked together geographically in a series of journeys.The Western Highlands contain some of the oldest rocks in Europe in a landscape formed more than a billion years ago that has re-emerged from the depths. Geologists have been examining these rocks since the early nineteenth century and, in spite of intense research in this tiny fraction of the Earths surface, major controversies still surround some of the rock formations. Many fundamentally important concepts in geology were first developed here and then applied elsewhere around the world. The region is an outstanding natural laboratory for the study of mountain building and folding, including the discovery that thick sequences of rocks have been turned completely upside down, and pushed sideways for over 100 kilometres. Representatives of all the major rocks types are found here, and their ages span three-quarters of geological time since the Earth began, some four and a half billion years ago.The journeys and localities are detailed in chapters: Tongue to Lochinver; Lochinver, Assynt, Ullapool; Ullapool to Gairloch; Gairloch to Kyle of Lochalsh; Kyle of Lochalsh, Glenelg, Mallaig, Cluanie, Glen Roy; Fort William, Loch Eil, Glenfinnan, Lochailort, Ardnamurchan, Strontian; Fort William, Ballachulish, Kentallen, Oban, Easdale, Kilmartin, Tayvallich and Kilmory; Fort William, Ben Nevis and Glen Nevis, Ballachulish, Glencoe, Glen Etive, Glen Orchy and Loch Lomond. Excursions are easily accessible, along footpaths and the coast, with a few more challenging options, including Ben Nevis, Scotlands highest mountain.

Hamish s Mountain Walk

Hamish s Mountain Walk


The Munros and Tops

A Record-Setting Walk in the Scottish Highlands Chris Townsend ... Soon I came to the Shielin' of Mark, a little bothy near the head of Glen Mark.

The Munros and Tops

When Chris Townsend reached the summit of Ben Hope in Sutherland, he walked his way into the record books. After 118 days in which he had covered more than 1,700 miles and climber over 575,000 feet, he had completed the first single continuous journey of all 277 Munros and 240 Tops in the Scottish Highlands.This is the story of that remarkable walk from the start on Ben More on the Isle of Mull through to the finish, the equivalent of climbing Mount Everest 18 times. For the author, the real enjoyment of the walk was not in counting up the summits or the miles but in spending week after week in the hills and living in the wilds. In THE MUNROS AND TOPS, Chris Townsend recalls the joys of observing the birds and animals, the trees and flowers, the changing shapes of the hills and the play of light on their slopes. He writes about the complexities of route-finding and the challenge of rugged terrain and of coping with often atrocious weather conditions. Illustrated with photographs taken during the walk, this is a stirring account of a unique achievement.