Second Language Learning Theories

Second Language Learning Theories

Second Language Learning Theories is a clear and concise overview of the field of second language acquisition (SLA) theories. Written by a team of leading academics working in different SLA specialisms, this book provides expert analysis of the main theories from multiple perspectives to offer a broad and balanced introduction to the topic. The book covers all the main theoretical perspectives currently active in the SLA field and sets them in a broader perspective per chapter, e.g. linguistic, cognitive or sociolinguistic. Each chapter examines how various theories view language, the learner, and the acquisition process. Summaries of key studies and examples of data relating to a variety of languages illustrate the different theoretical perspectives. Each chapter concludes with an evaluative summary of the theories discussed. This third edition has been thoroughly updated to reflect the very latest research in the field of SLA. Key features include: a fully re-worked chapter on cognitive models of language and language learning a new chapter on information processing, including the roles of different types of memory and knowledge in language learning the addition of a glossary of key linguistic terms to help the non-specialist a new timeline of second language learning theory development This third edition takes account of the significant developments that have taken place in the field in recent years. Highly active domains in which theoretical and methodological advances have been made are treated in more depth to ensure that this new edition of Second Language Learning Theories remains as fresh and relevant as ever.

Second Language Learning Theories

Fourth Edition

Second Language Learning Theories

Written by a team of leading experts working in different SLA specialisms, this fourth edition is a clear and concise introduction to the main theories of second language acquisition (SLA) from multiple perspectives, comprehensively updated to reflect the very latest developments SLA research in recent years. The book covers all the main theoretical perspectives currently active in SLA and sets each chapter within a broader framework. Each chapter examines the claims and scope of each theory and how each views language, the learner and the acquisition process, supplemented by summaries of key studies and data examples from a variety of languages. Chapters end with an evaluative summary of the theories discussed. Key features to this fourth edition include updated accounts of developments in cognitive approaches to second language (L2) learning, the implications of advances in generative linguistics and the "social turn" in L2 research, with re-worked chapters on functional, sociocultural and sociolinguistic perspectives, and an entirely new chapter on theory integration, in addition to updated examples using new studies. Second Language Learning Theories continues to be an essential resource for graduate students in second language acquisition.

Theories in Second Language Acquisition

An Introduction

Theories in Second Language Acquisition

The second edition of Theories in Second Language Acquisition seeks to build on the strengths of the first edition by surveying the major theories currently used in second language acquisition research. This volume is an ideal introductory text for undergraduate and graduate students in SLA and language teaching. Each chapter focuses on a single theory, written by a leading scholar in the field in an easy-to-follow style – a basic foundational description of the theory, relevant data or research models used with this theory, common misunderstandings, and a sample study from the field to show the theory in practice. This text is designed to provide a consistent and coherent presentation for those new to the field who seek basic understanding of theories that underlie contemporary SLA research. Researchers will also find the book useful as a "quick guide" to theoretical work outside their respective domains.

Second Language Learning Theories

Second Language Learning Theories

"Written by a team of leading experts working in different SLA specialisms, this fourth edition is a clear and concise introduction to the main theories of second language acquisition (SLA) from multiple perspectives, comprehensively updated to reflect the very latest developments SLA research in recent years. The book covers all the main theoretical perspectives currently active in SLA and sets each chapter within a broader framework. Each chapter examines the claims and scope of each theory and how each views language, the learner, and the acquisition process, supplemented by summaries of key studies and data examples from a variety of languages. Chapters end with an evaluative summary of the theories discussed. Key features to this fourth edition include updated accounts of developments in cognitive approaches to L2 learning, the implications of advances in generative linguistics, and the 'social turn' in L2 research, with re-worked chapters on functional, sociocultural and sociolinguistic perspectives, in addition to updated examples using new studies. Second Language Learning Theories continues to be an essential resource for graduate students in second language acquisition"--

Theory Construction in Second Language Acquisition

Theory Construction in Second Language Acquisition

Recently, many SLA researchers have adopted a postmodernist approach which challenges the assumption that SLA research is a rationalist, scientific endeavour. The resulting epistemological arguments, plus problems of theory proliferation, contradicting theories, and theory domain, hinder progress towards a unified theory of SLA. Theory Construction in SLA addresses these problems by returning to first principles; it asks whether there is such a thing as reliable knowledge, what is special about scientific method, and how we can best explain SLA. It is the first book to use the philosophy of science in order to examine the epistemological underpinnings of SLA research and evaluate rival theories of SLA. Part One explores the central issues in the philosophy of science, defends rationality against relativists, and offers Guidelines for theory assessment. Part Two examines different theories of SLA and evaluates them in terms of how well they stand up to the Guidelines.

Crosscurrents in Second Language Acquisition and Linguistic Theories

Crosscurrents in Second Language Acquisition and Linguistic Theories

The term “crosscurrent” is defined as “a current flowing counter to another.” This volume represents crosscurrents in second language acquisition and linguistic theory in several respects. First, although the main currents running between linguistics and second language acquisition have traditionally flowed from theory to application, equally important contributions can be made in the other direction as well. Second, although there is a strong tendency in the field of linguistics to see “theorists” working within formal models of syntax, SLA research can contribute to linguistic theory more broadly defined to include various functional as well as formal models of syntax, theories of phonology, variationist theories of sociolinguists, etc. These assumptions formed the basis for a conference held at Stanford University during the Linguistic Institute there in the summer of 1987. The conference was organized to update the relation between second language acquisition and linguistic theory. This book contains a selection of (mostly revised and updated) papers of this conference and two newly written papers.

Second Language Learning Theories

Second Language Learning Theories

This text presents an accessible and concise overview of the most current theories and approaches of second language learning. It provides an up-to-date introduction to the key concepts and issues, as well as a brief history of this area of research. Written for students coming to the study of linguistics for the first time, the book covers a wide range of approaches, including linguistic, cognitive, and social.

Second Language Acquisition

Second Language Acquisition

This 1986 textbook presents an account of the main concerns, problems and theoretical and practical issues raised by second language acquisition research. Research in this field had been mainly pedagogically oriented, but since the 1970s linguists and psychologists have become increasingly interested in the principles that underlie second language acquisition for the light these throw on how human language processing functions in general. Moreover, it is only through an understanding of these principles that foreign language teaching can become maximally effective. In the first part of his book, Wolfgang Klein provides a critical assessment of the state of the art at the time. The second part, 'from the learner's point of view', is devoted to four central problems which anyone learning a second language (either through everyday communication or in the classroom) is faced with, and whose solution constitutes the acquisition process. This accessible introduction provides students of linguistics and applied linguistics and anyone concerned with foreign language teaching with a real understanding of the fundamental issues in the field.

Foreign and Second Language Learning

Language Acquisition Research and Its Implications for the Classroom

Foreign and Second Language Learning

In Foreign and Second Language Learning, William Littlewood surveys recent research into how people acquire languages and considers its relevance for language teaching. He describes the most important studies and ideas about first language acquisition, and how these have influenced and developed into studies of second language acquisition. He considers the background of language theories which were current before the present interest in acquisition research, and looks at factors such as learners' errors, whether learners are predisposed to acquire language in certain sequences, why some people are apparently more successful at learning languages than others, and how learners make use of their new language to communicate. The use of clear examples, the careful explanation and balanced commentary on the research enable the reader to evaluate the evidence and consider the relevance of work in this field to the day to day concerns of teaching and learning languages.