A Secret London

By Kristine Valenzuela and Matthew Green A Secret London Copyright: Kristine Valenzuela and Matthew Green Published: November 2014 ISBN: 978-0-9925553-8-2 Published by DoctorZed Publishing www.doctorzed.com All rights reserved.

A Secret London

From the creators of Monster Circus and A Secret Sydney. Experience London’s famous landmarks and events through the eyes of fairies. Dance with the performers of Covent Garden. Fly around Piccadilly Circus. Join the Changing of the Guard. Walk on the Tower Bridge. Take a ride on the London Underground. Play tennis on Wimbledon’s Centre Court. Every page uncovers a secret as each illustration and poetry beautifully paints the hidden world of fairies that lies within everyday London. See the UK’s largest city in a whole new perspective. Welcome to A Secret London.

Secret London

London still holds hidden treasures for those who know how to wander off the beaten track. An indispensable guide for those who thought they knew London well, or who would like to discover the hidden face of the city.

Secret London

London still holds hidden treasures for those who know how to wander off the beaten track. This book ia a guide for those who thought they knew London well, or who would like to discover the hidden face of the city.

At Her Majestys Secret Service

Hyde, Harford Montgomery, Secret Intelligence Agent (London: Constable, 1982). ______, George Blake: Superspy (London: Constable, 1987). Jenssen, Baroness Carla, I Spy! (London: Jarrolds, 1930). John, Otto, Twice Through The Lines (New ...

At Her Majestys Secret Service

In August 1909, a kindly, balding, figure named Mansfield Smith-Cumming was summoned to London by Admiral Alexander Bethell, Director of Naval Intelligence. He was to assume the inaugural position of Chief – more famously known as ‘C – of what has become

Secret Weapons

Emsley, John, Molecules of Murder, London: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2008 Endicott, Stephen and Hagerman, Edward, The United States and Biological Warfare: Secrets from the Early Cold War and Korea, Indiana: University Press, ...

Secret Weapons

Deep in the bunkers of Nazi Germany, many of the world's top scientists worked to create a new generation of war winning super-weapons. A few of these, such as jet aircraft and the V2 rocket, became realities at the end of the war, others never made it off the drawing-board. Written by noted research scientist, Brian Ford, this exciting book charts the history of secret weapons development by all the major powers during the war, from British radar to Japanese ray-guns, and explains the impact that these developments eventually had on the outcome of World War II. Ford also takes a look at the weapons that never made it to development stage, as well as the more radical plans, such as the idea of turning Hitler into a woman with hormone treatment.

Britain s Secret War against Japan 1937 1945

Winterbotham, F.W., The ULTRA Secret, London: Weidenfeld& Nicolson, 1974. Secondary Sources – books, edited collections, articles, essays andpapers Aldrich, R.J., The Key to the South: Britain, the US and Thailand during the approach of ...

Britain s Secret War against Japan  1937 1945

A new look at how Britain’s defence establishment learned to engage Japan’s armed forces as the Pacific War progressed. Douglas Ford reveals that, prior to Japan’s invasion of Southeast Asia in December 1941, the British held a contemptuous view of Japanese military prowess. He shows that the situation was not helped by the high level of secrecy which surrounded Japan’s war planning, as well as the absence of prior engagements with the Imperial Japanese Navy and Army. The fall of ‘Fortress Singapore’ in February 1942 dispelled the notion that the Japanese were incapable of challenging the West. British military officials acknowledged how their forces in the Far East were inadequate, and made a concerted effort to improve their strength and efficiency. However, because Britain’s forces were tied down in their operations in Europe, North Africa and the Mediterranean, they had to fight the Japanese with limited resources. Drawing upon the lessons obtained through Allied experiences in the Pacific theatres as well as their own encounters in Southeast Asia, the British used the available intelligence on the strategy, tactics and morale of Japan’s armed forces to make the best use of what they had, and by the closing stages of the war in 1944 to 1945, they were able to devise a war plan which paved the way for the successful war effort. This book will be of great interest to all students of the Second World War, intelligence studies, British military history and strategic studies in general.

Conrad s Popular Fictions

Secret Histories and Sensational Novels Andrew Glazzard. Investigation Department, London: George Routledge, 1904. Greer, Tom, A Modern Dædalus, London: Griffith, Farran, Okeden & Welsh, 1885. Griffith, George, The Angel of the ...

Conrad   s Popular Fictions

Detectives, police informers, spies and spymasters, anarchists and terrorists, swindlers: these are the character types explored in Conrad's Popular Fictions. This book shows how Joseph Conrad experimented creatively with genres such as crime and espionage fiction, and sheds new light on the sources and contexts of his work.

The Hidden History of Bletchley Park

Cannadine, D., Aspects of Aristocracy: Grandeur and Decline in Modern Britain (London, 1994). Clayton, A., The Enemy is Listening: The Story of the Y Service (London, 1988). Collier, B., Hidden Weapons: Allied Secret or Undercover ...

The Hidden History of Bletchley Park

This book is a 'hidden' history of Bletchley Park during the Second World War, which explores the agency from a social and gendered perspective. It examines themes such as: the experience of wartime staff members; the town in which the agency was situated; and the cultural influences on the wartime evolution of the agency.

Thailand s Secret War

London: British Broadcasting Corporation, 1984. FRUS, see under US Department of State. Gellman, Irwin F.SecretAffairs. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995. Gilchrist, Andrew. Bangkok Top Secret. London: Hutchinson, 1970.

Thailand s Secret War

This book is an absorbing account of secret operations and political intrigue in wartime Thailand. During World War II Free Thai organisations co-operated with Allied intelligence agencies in an effort to rescue their nation from the consequences of its 1941 alliance with Japan. They largely succeeded despite internal differences and the conflicting interests and policies of their would-be-allies, China, Great Britain and the United States. London's determination to punish Thailand placed the British Special Operations Executive (SOE) at a serious disadvantage in its rivalry with the American Office of Strategic Services (OSS). The US State Department, in contrast, strongly supported OSS operations in Thailand, viewing them as a vehicle for promoting American political and economic influence in mainland Southeast Asia. Declassification of the records of the OSS and the SOE permits full revelation of this complex story of heroic action and political intrigue.

Conrad s Secrets

Joseph Conrad, The Secret (London: J.M.Dent, 1923), Agent 11. All references are to this edition, which will be cited in thetext as SA. 3. M.M. Bakhtin,The DialogicImagination, ed. MichaelHolquist (Austin, Texas: Universityof Texas ...

Conrad s Secrets

Conrad's Secrets explores a range of knowledges which would have been familiar to Conrad and his original readers. Drawing on research into trade, policing, sexual and financial scandals, changing theories of trauma and contemporary war-crimes, the book provides contexts for Conrad's fictions and produces original readings of his work.

Ben Macintyre s Espionage Files

Rankin, Nicholas, Churchill's Wizards: The British Genius for Deception 1914–1945 (London, 2008.) Robertson, Terence, The Ship with Two Captains: The Story of the 'Secret Mission Submarine' (London, 1957). Rose, Andrew, Lethal Witness: ...

Ben Macintyre s Espionage Files

Agent Zigzag: One December night in 1942, a Nazi parachutist landed in a Cambridgeshire field. His mission: to sabotage the British war effort. His name was Eddie Chapman, but he would shortly become MI5's Agent Zigzag. Dashing and louche, courageous and unpredictable, inside the traitor was a hero, inside the villain, a man of conscience: the problem for Chapman, his many lovers and his spymasters, was knowing where one ended and the other began. Ben Macintyre weaves together diaries, letters, photographs, memories and top-secret MI5 files to create the exhilarating account of Britain's most sensational double agent. Operation Mincemeat: One overcast April morning in 1943, a fisherman notices a corpse floating in the sea off the coast of Spain. When the body is brought ashore, he is identified as a British soldier, Major William Martin of the Royal Marines. A leather attaché case, secured to his belt, reveals an intelligence goldmine: top-secret documents Allied invasion plans. But Major William Martin never existed. The body is that of a dead Welsh tramp and every single document is fake. Operation Mincemeat is the incredible true story of the most extraordinary deception ever planned by Churchill's spies - an outrageous lie that travelled from a Whitehall basement, all the way to Hitler's desk. Double Cross: D-Day, 6 June 1944, the turning point of the Second World War, was a victory of arms. But it was also a triumph for a different kind of operation: one of deceit... At the heart of the deception was the 'Double Cross System', a team of double agents whose bravery, treachery, greed and inspiration succeeded in convincing the Nazis that Calais and Norway, not Normandy, were the targets of the 150,000-strong Allied invasion force. These were not conventional warriors, but their masterpiece of deceit saved thousands of lives. Their codenames were Bronx, Brutus, Treasure, Tricycle and Garbo. This is their story.

Britain and European Resistance 1940 45

Wheeler-Bennett, J. W. and Nicholls, A. The Semblance of Peace: the Political Settlement after the Second World War (London, 1972). Wilson, Field-Marshall Lord. Eight Years Overseas (London, 1948). Winterbotham, F. W. The Ultra Secret ...

Britain and European Resistance  1940 45


Codebreaker in the Far East

Allen, Louis, Burma, the longest War (London: Dent, 1984) Andrew, Christopher, Secret Service: the Making of the British Intelligence Community (London: Heinemann, 1985); in US Her Majesty's Secret Service (New York: Viking, ...

Codebreaker in the Far East

This is the first book to describe British wartime success in breaking Japanese codes of dazzling variety and great complexity which contributed to the victory in Burma three months before Hiroshima. Written for the general reader, this first-hand account describes the difficulty of decoding one of the most complex languages in the world in some of the most difficult conditions. The book was published in 1989 to avoid proposed legislation which would prohibit those in the security services from publishing secret information.

Operation Mincemeat

Stafford , David , Churchill and the Secret Service ( London , 1997 ) . Roosevelt and Churchill : Men of Secrets ( London , 1999 ) . Stephens , R. “ Tin Eye ' , Camp 020 : MI5 and the Nazi Spies ; Introduction by Oliver Hoare ( London ...

Operation Mincemeat

**Soon to be a major film, starring Colin Firth, Matthew Macfadyen, Kelly Macdonald, Penelope Wilson, Johnny Flynn and Jason Isaacs** A RICHARD AND JUDY BOOK CLUB SELECTION A SUNDAY TIMES NO. 1 BESTSELLER 'Astonishing ... Sheds riveting new light on this breathtaking plan' Daily Mail 'A rollicking read' Max Hastings, Sunday Times 'Brilliant and almost absurdly entertaining' New Yorker _______________________ April, 1943: a sardine fisherman spots the corpse of a British soldier floating in the sea off the coast of Spain and sets off a train of events that would change the course of the Second World War. Operation Mincemeat was the most successful wartime deception ever attempted, and the strangest. It hoodwinked the Nazi espionage chiefs, sent German troops hurtling in the wrong direction, and saved thousands of lives by deploying a secret agent who was different, in one crucial respect, from any spy before or since: he was dead. His mission: to convince the Germans that instead of attacking Sicily, the Allied armies planned to invade Greece. This is the true story of the most extraordinary deception ever planned by Churchill's spies: an outrageous lie that travelled from a Whitehall basement all the way to Hitler's desk.

Historical Dictionary of British Intelligence

MI6: The History of the Secret Intelligence Service, 1909–1945. London: Bloomsbury, 2010. Jones, R. V. Most Secret War. London: Hamilton, 1978. McKay, C. G. “Our Man in Reval.” INS 9, no. 1 (1994): 88–111. Madeira, Victor.

Historical Dictionary of British Intelligence

British Intelligence is the oldest, most experienced organization of its kind in the world, the unseen hand behind so many world events, and glamorized by James Bond. Despite the change in role, from a global power controlling an Empire that covered much of the world, to a mere partner in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the European Union, the country’s famed security and intelligence apparatus continues largely intact, and recognized as “punching above its weight.” Feared by the Soviets, admired and trusted by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), British Intelligence has provided the hidden dimension to the conduct of domestic and foreign policy, with the added mystique of Whitehall secrecy, a shroud that for years protected the identities of the shadowy figures who recruited the sources, broke the codes, and caught the spies. This second edition of Historical Dictionary of the British Intelligence covers the history through a chronology, an introductory essay, appendixes, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 1,000 cross-referenced entries on specific operations, spies and their handlers, the moles and defectors, top leaders, and main organizations. This book is an excellent access point for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about the British Intelligence.

Killing the Enemy

Urban, Mark: Task Force Black: The explosive true story of the SAS and the secret war in Iraq (London: Little, Brown, 2010). van Creveld, Martin: The Art of War: War and Military ...

Killing the Enemy

During World War II, the British formed a secret division, the 'SOE' or Special Operations Executive, in order to support resistance organisations in occupied Europe. It also engaged in 'targeted killing' - the assassination of enemy political and military leaders. The unit is famous for equipping its agents with tools for use behind enemy lines, such as folding motorbikes, miniature submarines and suicide pills disguised as coat buttons. But its activities are now also gaining attention as a forerunner to today's 'extra-legal' killings of wartime enemies in foreign territory, for example through the use of unmanned drones. Adam Leong's work evaluates the effectiveness of political assassination in wartime using four examples: Heydrich's assassination in Prague (Operation Anthropoid); the daring kidnap of Major General Kreipe in Crete by Patrick Leigh Fermor; the failed attempt to assassinate Rommel, known as Operation Flipper; and the American assassination of General Yamamoto.

Twentieth Century Crime Mystery Writers

London, Ward Lock, 1898; Boston, Little Brown, 1905. The Man and His Kingdom. London, Ward Lock, and Philadelphia, Lippincott, 1899. Mr. Marx's Secret. London, Simpkin Marshall, 1899; New York, Street and Smith, 1899(?).

Twentieth Century Crime   Mystery Writers


Moving to London

... London Travel Clinic http://www.londontravelclinic.co.uk Miscellaneous London things to do Design My Night https://www.designmynight.com/london Londonist http://londonist.com Secret London http://www.secret-london.co.uk/Welcome.html ...

Moving to London

Moving to a new city can be a daunting experience and London is regarded as one of the world's most expensive. If you are moving to London or currently live here, this book could help. Written by a Brit who moved to the city, this is a practical guide, packed with tried and tested advice. It will help you get to know London while keeping your finances under control. It covers finding accommodation, getting a job, transportation, meeting others, arts and culture, managing expenses and much more. The book also contains an exhaustive list of useful resources to help you save more.

The A to Z of British Intelligence

3. Whitwell, John. British Agent. London: William Kimber, 1966. Winterbotham, F. W. Secret and Personal. London: William Kimber, 1969. . The Ultra Secret. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1974, . The Ultra Spy. London: Macmillan, 1989.

The A to Z of British Intelligence

The A to Z of British Intelligence offers insight into the history and operations of British Intelligence through its more than 1,800 entries, covering a vast and varied cast of characters: the spies and their handlers, the moles and defectors, the political leaders, the top brass, the techniques and jargon, and the many different offices and organizations.

The Mitrokhin Archive

4 Bamford, James, The Puzzle Palace (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1982) Barker, Elizabeth, Austria 1918–1972 (London: Macmillan, 1973) Barron, John, KGB: The Secret Work of Soviet Secret Agents, paperback edition (New York: Bantam Books, ...

The Mitrokhin Archive

'One of the biggest intelligence coups in recent years' The Times For years KGB operative Vasili Mitrokhin risked his life hiding top-secret material from Russian secret service archives beneath his family dacha. When he was exfiltrated to the West he took with him what the FBI called 'the most complete and extensive intelligence ever received from any source'. This extraordinary bestselling book is the result. 'Co-authored in a brilliant partnership by Christopher Andrew and the renegade Soviet archivist himself ... This is a truly global exposé of major KGB penetrations throughout the Western world' The Times 'This tale of malevolent spymasters, intricate tradecraft and cold-eyed betrayal reads like a cold war novel' Time 'Sensational ... the most informed and detailed study of Soviet subversive intrigues worldwide' Spectator 'The most comprehensive addition to the subject ever published' Sunday Telegraph