At Her Majestys Secret Service

Hyde, Harford Montgomery, Secret Intelligence Agent (London: Constable, 1982). ______, George Blake: Superspy (London: Constable, 1987). Jenssen, Baroness Carla, I Spy! (London: Jarrolds, 1930). John, Otto, Twice Through The Lines (New ...

At Her Majestys Secret Service

In August 1909, a kindly, balding, figure named Mansfield Smith-Cumming was summoned to London by Admiral Alexander Bethell, Director of Naval Intelligence. He was to assume the inaugural position of Chief – more famously known as ‘C – of what has become

Twentieth Century Crime Mystery Writers

London, Hodder and Stoughton, and New York, Macaulay, 1924. Fine Feathers. London, Stanley Paul, 1924. A Woman's Debt. London, Ward Lock, 1924. The Valrose Mystery. London, Ward Lock, 1925. The Marked Man. London, Ward Lock, 1925.

Twentieth Century Crime   Mystery Writers


Secret Weapons

Emsley, John, Molecules of Murder, London: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2008 Endicott, Stephen and Hagerman, Edward, The United States and Biological Warfare: Secrets from the Early Cold War and Korea, Indiana: University Press, ...

Secret Weapons

Deep in the bunkers of Nazi Germany, many of the world's top scientists worked to create a new generation of war winning super-weapons. A few of these, such as jet aircraft and the V2 rocket, became realities at the end of the war, others never made it off the drawing-board. Written by noted research scientist, Brian Ford, this exciting book charts the history of secret weapons development by all the major powers during the war, from British radar to Japanese ray-guns, and explains the impact that these developments eventually had on the outcome of World War II. Ford also takes a look at the weapons that never made it to development stage, as well as the more radical plans, such as the idea of turning Hitler into a woman with hormone treatment.

Conrad s Popular Fictions

Secret Histories and Sensational Novels Andrew Glazzard. Investigation Department, London: George Routledge, 1904. Greer, Tom, A Modern Dædalus, London: Griffith, Farran, Okeden & Welsh, 1885. Griffith, George, The Angel of the ...

Conrad   s Popular Fictions

Detectives, police informers, spies and spymasters, anarchists and terrorists, swindlers: these are the character types explored in Conrad's Popular Fictions. This book shows how Joseph Conrad experimented creatively with genres such as crime and espionage fiction, and sheds new light on the sources and contexts of his work.

Ben Macintyre s Espionage Files

Rankin, Nicholas, Churchill's Wizards: The British Genius for Deception 1914–1945 (London, 2008.) Robertson, Terence, The Ship with Two Captains: The Story of the 'Secret Mission Submarine' (London, 1957). Rose, Andrew, Lethal Witness: ...

Ben Macintyre s Espionage Files

Agent Zigzag: One December night in 1942, a Nazi parachutist landed in a Cambridgeshire field. His mission: to sabotage the British war effort. His name was Eddie Chapman, but he would shortly become MI5's Agent Zigzag. Dashing and louche, courageous and unpredictable, inside the traitor was a hero, inside the villain, a man of conscience: the problem for Chapman, his many lovers and his spymasters, was knowing where one ended and the other began. Ben Macintyre weaves together diaries, letters, photographs, memories and top-secret MI5 files to create the exhilarating account of Britain's most sensational double agent. Operation Mincemeat: One overcast April morning in 1943, a fisherman notices a corpse floating in the sea off the coast of Spain. When the body is brought ashore, he is identified as a British soldier, Major William Martin of the Royal Marines. A leather attaché case, secured to his belt, reveals an intelligence goldmine: top-secret documents Allied invasion plans. But Major William Martin never existed. The body is that of a dead Welsh tramp and every single document is fake. Operation Mincemeat is the incredible true story of the most extraordinary deception ever planned by Churchill's spies - an outrageous lie that travelled from a Whitehall basement, all the way to Hitler's desk. Double Cross: D-Day, 6 June 1944, the turning point of the Second World War, was a victory of arms. But it was also a triumph for a different kind of operation: one of deceit... At the heart of the deception was the 'Double Cross System', a team of double agents whose bravery, treachery, greed and inspiration succeeded in convincing the Nazis that Calais and Norway, not Normandy, were the targets of the 150,000-strong Allied invasion force. These were not conventional warriors, but their masterpiece of deceit saved thousands of lives. Their codenames were Bronx, Brutus, Treasure, Tricycle and Garbo. This is their story.

The Hidden History of Bletchley Park

Cannadine, D., Aspects of Aristocracy: Grandeur and Decline in Modern Britain (London, 1994). Clayton, A., The Enemy is Listening: The Story of the Y Service (London, 1988). Collier, B., Hidden Weapons: Allied Secret or Undercover ...

The Hidden History of Bletchley Park

This book is a 'hidden' history of Bletchley Park during the Second World War, which explores the agency from a social and gendered perspective. It examines themes such as: the experience of wartime staff members; the town in which the agency was situated; and the cultural influences on the wartime evolution of the agency.

Conrad s Secrets

Joseph Conrad, The Secret (London: J.M.Dent, 1923), Agent 11. All references are to this edition, which will be cited in thetext as SA. 3. M.M. Bakhtin,The DialogicImagination, ed. MichaelHolquist (Austin, Texas: Universityof Texas ...

Conrad s Secrets

Conrad's Secrets explores a range of knowledges which would have been familiar to Conrad and his original readers. Drawing on research into trade, policing, sexual and financial scandals, changing theories of trauma and contemporary war-crimes, the book provides contexts for Conrad's fictions and produces original readings of his work.

Britain and European Resistance 1940 45

Wheeler-Bennett, J. W. and Nicholls, A. The Semblance of Peace: the Political Settlement after the Second World War (London, 1972). Wilson, Field-Marshall Lord. Eight Years Overseas (London, 1948). Winterbotham, F. W. The Ultra Secret ...

Britain and European Resistance  1940 45


Churchill s Man of Mystery

Salmon, Patrick: 'British plans for Economic Warfare against Germany', Walter Laqueur (ed), The Second World War: Essays in Military and Political History (London: Sage Publications, 1982) Shephard, Ben: A War of Nerves: Soldiers and ...

Churchill s Man of Mystery

The mysterious life and career of Desmond Morton, Intelligence officer and personal adviser to Winston Churchill during the Second World War, is exposed for the first time in this study based on full access to official records. After distinguished service as artillery officer and aide-de-camp to General Haig during the First World War, Morton worked for the Secret Intelligence Service from 1919-1934, and the fortunes of SIS in the interwar years are described here in unprecedented detail. As Director of the Industrial Intelligence Centre in the 1930s, Morton’s warnings of Germany’s military and industrial preparations for war were widely read in Whitehall, though they failed to accelerate British rearmament as much as Morton - and Churchill - considered imperative. Morton had met Churchill on the Western Front in 1916 and supported him throughout the ‘wilderness years’, moving to Downing Street as the Prime Minister’s Intelligence adviser in May 1940. There he remained in a liaison role, with the Intelligence Agencies and with Allied resistance authorities, until the end of the war, when he became a ‘troubleshooter’ for the Treasury in a series of tricky international assignments. Throughout Morton’s career, myth, rumour and deliberate obfuscation have created a misleading picture of his role and influence. This book shines a light into many hitherto shadowy corners of British history in the first half of the twentieth century. This book will be of great interest to scholars and informed lay readers with an interest in the Second World War, intelligence studies and the life of Winston Churchill.

Spy Fiction Spy Films and Real Intelligence

N. Everitt, British Secret Service during the Great War (London, 1920), pp.53, 72. 'F. Douglas' [E de Valda], 'The Greatest Secret Service Story,' Sunday Chronicle, 21 April 1929, p.7 col.1. Mackenzie, Greek Memories, p.308; P. Brown, ...

Spy Fiction  Spy Films and Real Intelligence

This book won the Canadian Crime Writers' Arthur Ellis Award for the Best Genre Criticism/Reference book of 1991. This collection of essays is an attempt to explore the history of spy fiction and spy films and investigate the significance of the ideas they contain. The volume offers new insights into the development and symbolism of British spy fiction.

Codebreaker in the Far East

Allen, Louis, Burma, the longest War (London: Dent, 1984) Andrew, Christopher, Secret Service: the Making of the British Intelligence Community (London: Heinemann, 1985); in US Her Majesty's Secret Service (New York: Viking, ...

Codebreaker in the Far East

This is the first book to describe British wartime success in breaking Japanese codes of dazzling variety and great complexity which contributed to the victory in Burma three months before Hiroshima. Written for the general reader, this first-hand account describes the difficulty of decoding one of the most complex languages in the world in some of the most difficult conditions. The book was published in 1989 to avoid proposed legislation which would prohibit those in the security services from publishing secret information.

Historical Dictionary of British Intelligence

MI6: The History of the Secret Intelligence Service, 1909–1945. London: Bloomsbury, 2010. Jones, R. V. Most Secret War. London: Hamilton, 1978. McKay, C. G. “Our Man in Reval.” INS 9, no. 1 (1994): 88–111. Madeira, Victor.

Historical Dictionary of British Intelligence

British Intelligence is the oldest, most experienced organization of its kind in the world, the unseen hand behind so many world events, and glamorized by James Bond. Despite the change in role, from a global power controlling an Empire that covered much of the world, to a mere partner in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the European Union, the country’s famed security and intelligence apparatus continues largely intact, and recognized as “punching above its weight.” Feared by the Soviets, admired and trusted by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), British Intelligence has provided the hidden dimension to the conduct of domestic and foreign policy, with the added mystique of Whitehall secrecy, a shroud that for years protected the identities of the shadowy figures who recruited the sources, broke the codes, and caught the spies. This second edition of Historical Dictionary of the British Intelligence covers the history through a chronology, an introductory essay, appendixes, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 1,000 cross-referenced entries on specific operations, spies and their handlers, the moles and defectors, top leaders, and main organizations. This book is an excellent access point for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about the British Intelligence.

The Secret Teachers of the Western World

Mary Anne South, A Suggestive Inquiry into the Hermetic Mystery with a Dissertation on the More Celebrated of the Alchemical Philosophers (London: Trelawney Saunders, 1850), p. 135. 53. Ibid., p. 69. 54. Ibid., p. 192. 55. Ibid., p.

The Secret Teachers of the Western World

This epic study unveils the esoteric masters who have covertly impacted the intellectual development of the West, from Pythagoras and Zoroaster to the little-known modern icons Jean Gebser and Schwaller de Lubicz. Running alongside the mainstream of Western intellectual history there is another current which, in a very real sense, should take pride of place, but which for the last few centuries has occupied a shadowy, inferior position, somewhere underground. This "other" stream forms the subject of Gary Lachman’s epic history and analysis, The Secret Teachers of the Western World. In this clarifying, accessible, and fascinating study, the acclaimed historian explores the Western esoteric tradition – a thought movement with ancient roots and modern expressions, which, in a broad sense, regards the cosmos as a living, spiritual, meaningful being and humankind as having a unique obligation and responsibility in it. The historical roots of our “counter tradition,” as Lachman explores, have their beginning in Alexandria around the time of Christ. It was then that we find the first written accounts of the ancient tradition, which had earlier been passed on orally. Here, in this remarkable city, filled with teachers, philosophers, and mystics from Egypt, Greece, Asia, and other parts of the world, in a multi-cultural, multi-faith, and pluralistic society, a synthesis took place, a creative blending of different ideas and visions, which gave the hidden tradition the eclectic character it retains today. The history of our esoteric tradition roughly forms three parts: Part One: After looking back at the earliest roots of the esoteric tradition in ancient Egypt and Greece, the historical narrative opens in Alexandria in the first centuries of the Christian era. Over the following centuries, it traces our “other” tradition through such agents as the Hermeticists; Kabbalists; Gnostics; Neoplatonists; and early Church fathers, among many others. We examine the reemergence of the lost Hermetic books in the Renaissance and their influence on the emerging modern mind. Part Two begins with the fall of Hermeticism in the late Renaissance and the beginning of “the esoteric counterculture.” In 1614, the same year that the Hermetic teachings fell from grace, a strange document appeared in Kassel, Germany announcing the existence of a mysterious fraternity: the Rosicrucians. Part two charts the impact of the Rosicrucians and the esoteric currents that followed, such as the Romance movement and the European occult revival of the late nineteenth century, including Madame Blavatsky and the opening of the western mind to the wisdom of the East, and the fin-de-siècle occultism of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. Part Three chronicles the rise of “modern esotericism,” as seen in the influence of Rudolf Steiner, Gurdjieff, Annie Besant, Krishnamurti, Aleister Crowley, R. A Schwaller de Lubicz, and many others. Central is the life and work of C.G. Jung, perhaps the most important figure in the development of modern spirituality. The book looks at the occult revival of the “mystic sixties” and our own New Age, and how this itself has given birth to a more critical, rigorous investigation of the ancient wisdom. With many detours and dead ends, we now seem to be slowly moving into a watershed. It has become clear that the dominant, left-brain, reductionist view, once so liberating and exciting, has run out of steam, and the promise of that much-sought-after “paradigm change” seems possible. We may be on the brink of a culminating moment of the esoteric intellectual tradition of the West.

Operation Mincemeat

Sebag-Montefiore, Hugh, Enigma: The Battlefor the Code (London, 2000). Smyth, Denis, Diplomacy and Strategy ofSurvival: British Policy and Franco's Spain 1940–41 (Cambridge, 1986). Stafford, David, Churchill and the Secret Service ...

Operation Mincemeat

From the bestselling author of Agent Zigzag. The thrilling true story of the greatest and most successful wartime deception ever attempted A Richard & Judy Book Club selection

Killing the Enemy

Urban, Mark: Task Force Black: The explosive true story of the SAS and the secret war in Iraq (London: Little, Brown, 2010). van Creveld, Martin: The Art of War: War and Military ...

Killing the Enemy

During World War II, the British formed a secret division, the 'SOE' or Special Operations Executive, in order to support resistance organisations in occupied Europe. It also engaged in 'targeted killing' - the assassination of enemy political and military leaders. The unit is famous for equipping its agents with tools for use behind enemy lines, such as folding motorbikes, miniature submarines and suicide pills disguised as coat buttons. But its activities are now also gaining attention as a forerunner to today's 'extra-legal' killings of wartime enemies in foreign territory, for example through the use of unmanned drones. Adam Leong's work evaluates the effectiveness of political assassination in wartime using four examples: Heydrich's assassination in Prague (Operation Anthropoid); the daring kidnap of Major General Kreipe in Crete by Patrick Leigh Fermor; the failed attempt to assassinate Rommel, known as Operation Flipper; and the American assassination of General Yamamoto.

The A to Z of British Intelligence

3. Whitwell, John. British Agent. London: William Kimber, 1966. Winterbotham, F. W. Secret and Personal. London: William Kimber, 1969. . The Ultra Secret. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1974, . The Ultra Spy. London: Macmillan, 1989.

The A to Z of British Intelligence

The A to Z of British Intelligence offers insight into the history and operations of British Intelligence through its more than 1,800 entries, covering a vast and varied cast of characters: the spies and their handlers, the moles and defectors, the political leaders, the top brass, the techniques and jargon, and the many different offices and organizations.

The Mercantile Navy List

12795 Sea Witch , London Sr. Blyth 1856 L.D.H.W 23422 Sea Witch , London Bk . Blackwall 1848 N.R.M.J 31493 * Sea Witch ... Secret , Jersey Cr . Jersey 1850 L.Q.B.K 61067 Secret , Launceston Sr. Launceston 1874 14739 Secret , London Cr ...

The Mercantile Navy List


Animal Alchemy

Wildlife Centre was hidden in the park, although in truth it wasn't that secret and thus, to historians and landscape artists it didn't qualify as a part of Secret London. Secret London was on the map, it was just that nobody appeared ...

Animal Alchemy

Jag, short for Jaguar, was orphaned when her environmentalist parents died in the jungle saving animals’ lives. Although she was put into a care home, she ran away two years to live on the streets where she was adopted into a street gang who have now become her family. Danny, the trickster and street magician and Tiger, whose animal instincts run close to the surface, and a few others are all animal activists at heart. Although they go one night to an animal sanctuary in the country to tag the walls with graffiti, Jag gets caught in an enclosure. However, it ends up for the best as the keeper takes a shine to her and offers a part time job when she hears Jag’s affinity with the Jaguar spirit. With Jag working at the sanctuary, her gang start spending more time there to see the great Cat Man Do perform his animal magic – until one day when a tiger is let out its cage. And that is only the beginning as a villainous Cat Man begins to stalk the streets with two pet panthers out for blood, seemingly appearing and disappearing at will. With newspapers reporting maulings and deaths and Sergeant Dickins not sure what’s going on, the kids are intrigued by the reports. After witnessing an attack, the kids get sucked into this mysterious Cat Man’s idea of a theatrical villain performance – but even if they have animal instincts and spirits with them and even if the big cats are swaying to their side, should they run before they too turn prey?

The Mitrokhin Archive

4 Bamford, James, The Puzzle Palace (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1982) Barker, Elizabeth, Austria 1918–1972 (London: Macmillan, 1973) Barron, John, KGB: The Secret Work of Soviet Secret Agents, paperback edition (New York: Bantam Books, ...

The Mitrokhin Archive

'One of the biggest intelligence coups in recent years' The Times For years KGB operative Vasili Mitrokhin risked his life hiding top-secret material from Russian secret service archives beneath his family dacha. When he was exfiltrated to the West he took with him what the FBI called 'the most complete and extensive intelligence ever received from any source'. This extraordinary bestselling book is the result. 'Co-authored in a brilliant partnership by Christopher Andrew and the renegade Soviet archivist himself ... This is a truly global exposé of major KGB penetrations throughout the Western world' The Times 'This tale of malevolent spymasters, intricate tradecraft and cold-eyed betrayal reads like a cold war novel' Time 'Sensational ... the most informed and detailed study of Soviet subversive intrigues worldwide' Spectator 'The most comprehensive addition to the subject ever published' Sunday Telegraph