Selfless Persons

This book explains anatta through cultural, historical and Theravada Buddhist tradition and context.

Selfless Persons

This book explains anatta through cultural, historical and Theravada Buddhist tradition and context.

Selfless Persons

Selfless Persons


Zen Physics

Selfless Persons: Imagery and Thought in Theravada Buddhism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982. Confer, W. N., and B. S. Abies. Multiple Personality: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment. New York: Human Sciences Press, 1983.

Zen Physics

A scientific approach to the mysteries of human death combines scientific logic and Buddhist principles in order to prove the existence of an afterlife and to explain the Zen view of self, the senses, and reincarnation. National ad/promo.

Science Fiction and Philosophy

Persons and Bodies: A Constitution View. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ... The Conception of a Person as a Series of Mental Events. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73: 339–58. ... Selfless Persons: Imagery ...

Science Fiction and Philosophy

A timely volume that uses science fiction as a springboard to meaningful philosophical discussions, especially at points of contact between science fiction and new scientific developments. Raises questions and examines timely themes concerning the nature of the mind, time travel, artificial intelligence, neural enhancement, free will, the nature of persons, transhumanism, virtual reality, and neuroethics Draws on a broad range of books, films and television series, including The Matrix, Star Trek, Blade Runner, Frankenstein, Brave New World, The Time Machine, and Back to the Future Considers the classic philosophical puzzles that appeal to the general reader, while also exploring new topics of interest to the more seasoned academic

Your Life Isn t for You

This enhanced edition features six unique videos created by Seth Adam Smith, in settings ranging from nineteenth century England to medieval Russia, the Arizona desert, the mountains of Alaska, and more.

Your Life Isn t for You

This enhanced edition features six unique videos created by Seth Adam Smith, in settings ranging from nineteenth century England to medieval Russia, the Arizona desert, the mountains of Alaska, and more. Seth draws on literature, history, and his personal experiences with extraordinary "ordinary" people to tell stories that vividly illustrate the joys and rewards of a life lived for others. He also explains what it's like to live with a giant head and mean brothers and sisters. This book expands on the philosophy behind his extraordinarily popular blog post “Marriage Isn't for You”—which received over 30 million hits and has been translated into over twenty languages—and shares how living for others can enrich every aspect of your life, just as it has his. With a mix of humor, candor, and compassion, Seth Adam Smith reveals how, years before his marriage, his self-obsession led to a downward spiral of addiction and depression, culminating in a suicide attempt at the age of twenty. Reflecting on the love and support he experienced in the aftermath, as well as on the lessons he learned from a difficult missionary stint in Russia, his time as a youth leader in the Arizona desert, his marriage, and even a story his father read to him as a child, he shares his deep conviction that the only way you can find your life is to give it away to others.

The Great Transformation

17; Steven Collins, Selfless Persons: Imagery and Thought in Theravāda Buddhism (Cambridge, U.K., 1982), p. 64; L. Dumont, Homo Hierarchicus:The Caste System and Its Implications (Chicago and London, 1980), p. 46.

The Great Transformation

From Karen Armstrong, the bestselling author of A History of God and The Spiral Staircase, comes this extraordinary investigation of a critical moment in the evolution of religious thought. In the ninth century BCE, events in four regions of the civilized world led to the rise of religious traditions that have endured to the present day—development of Confucianism and Daoism in China, Hinduism and Buddhism in India, monotheism in Israel, and philosophical rationalism in Greece. Armstrong, one of our most prominent religious scholars, examines how these traditions began in response to the violence of their time. Studying figures as diverse as the Buddha and Socrates, Confucius and Jeremiah, Armstrong reveals how these still enduring philosophies can help address our contemporary problems.

Augustine and Time

13. See Collins, Selfless Persons, 234. 14. William James, The Principles of Psychology (New York: Holt, 1890), cited in Collins, Selfless Persons, 255. 15. Augustine, Confessions, 28.38, cited in Ricoeur, Time and Narrative, 20. 16.

Augustine and Time

This collection examines the topic of time in Augustine of Hippo. By placing Augustine into conversation with theologians and philosophers from the Islamic, Christian, and Buddhist traditions, the goal is to demonstrate the ongoing relevance of Augustine’s account of temporality across historical, cultural, and religious boundaries.

Altruism and Reality

Person and Object : A Metaphysical Study , London ( George Allen and Unwin ) . Collins , S. 1982. Selfless Persons , Cambridge ( Cambridge University Press ) . Dalai Lama , First 1987. dBu ma rtsa shes rtsa ' grel , Sarnath ( Central ...

Altruism and Reality

Brings together Paul Williams' previously published papers on the Indian and Tibetan interpretations of selected verses from the eighth and ninth chapters of the Bodhicaryavatara.

Philosophy of Religion

Chisholm, Roderick (1976) Person and Object (LaSalle, IL: Open Court). Defends a substance account of persons. Collins, Steven (1990) Selfless Persons: Imagery and Thought in Theravada Buddhism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).

Philosophy of Religion

Keith Yandell's Philosophy of Religion: A Contemporary Introduction was one of the first textbooks to explore the philosophy of religion with reference to religions other than Christianity. This new, revised edition explores the logical validity and truth claims of several world religions—Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism—with updated, streamlined discussions on important topics in philosophy of religion such as: Religious pluralism Freedom and responsibility Evidentialist Moral Theism Reformed Epistemology Doxastic Practice Epistemology The problem of evil Ontological and cosmological arguments Other new features include updated Questions for Reflection,and new Annotated Bibliographies for each chapter, as well as an updated Glossary. This exciting new edition, much like its classic predecessor, is sure to be a classroom staple for undergraduate students studying philosophy of religion, as well as a comprehensive introductory read for anyone interested in the subject.

Theology of Religions

(London and New York: Routledge, 2002), 17; Steven Collins, Selfless Persons: Imagery and Thought in Theravada Buddhism (Cambridge, London, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1982), 64. 10. Collins, Selfless Persons, 56–60. 11.

Theology of Religions

A comprehensive entry-level study of all the major world religions, from the major monotheistic faiths (Judaism, Christianity, Islam) to the lesser-known polytheistic religions (Zoroastrianism, Buddhism, Jainism).

Cetana and the Dynamics of Volition in Theravada Buddhism

31 S. Collins , Selfless Persons : Imagery and Thought in Theravāda Buddhism , 119 . 32 Ibid . , 202 . 33 E. Frauwallner , History of Indian Philosophy , 1 : 159 . 34 Ibid . , 1 : 159-160 . 35 L. Silburn , Instant et Cause : Le ...

Cetana and the Dynamics of Volition in Theravada Buddhism

What do the scriptures of Theravada Buddhism have to say about the most basic psychological processes through which alternatives are assessed, purposes are developed, and goal-oriented acts are initiated? How can Theravada make volitional endeavour central to Buddhist practice, while denying the existence of a self who wills? How can the text emphasize ethical striving, and yet uphold the principle that all physical and mental acts arise through causes and conditions? This book adds another perspective to Theravada scholarship by exploring various subtle Pali terms that seek to display the nuances of human motivation. Cetana is shown to be the purposive impetus that links ethically good and bad attitudes of mind with corresponding acts of body, speech, and mind. The argument is made that Theravada does not posit a controlling will, but seek to establish the possibility of changing attitudes, purposes, and acts through holistic methods of training. Theravada maintains that changes in attitude are possible because the mind has the capacity to observe its own processes of conditioning, and is able to greatly diversify its responses to its own concepts and to factors in its environment.

Pneumatology and the Christian Buddhist Dialogue

15 Steven Collins, Selfless Persons: Imagery and Thought in Theravada Buddhism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982), 95. 16 Collins, Selfless Persons, 183. 17 The literature on Nagarjuna continues to grow.

Pneumatology and the Christian Buddhist Dialogue

This project at the interface of Buddhist-Christian studies, comparative theology, and Christian systematic theology proceeds by way of exploring questions related to the presence and activity of the Holy Spirit in a 21st century world of many faiths.

The Two Truths Debate

Recognizing all phenomena as essentially empty and selfless, and thus as dependently arisen, necessarily requires ... it is not possible to know the selflessness of persons (gang zag bdag med, pudgalanair›tmya) or the selflessness of ...

The Two Truths Debate

The Middle Way is a central idea for all Buddhists, yet its definition varies across Buddhist cultures. In Tibetan Buddhism, the interpretation of what are called the two truths — the truth of conventional appearances and the ultimate truth of emptiness — is especially contentious. This comparative analysis examines the differing approaches toward the Middle Way taken by the two great Buddhist scholars, Tsongkhapa and Gorampa. It demonstrates how philosophical positions have dramatic implications both for how one approaches Buddhist practice and for how one ultimately understands enlightenment itself.

An Introduction to Indian Philosophy

Steven Collins, Selfless Persons, is indispensable for early Buddhist (Theravādin) representations of persons. Richard Gombrich, How Buddhism Began, puts many things in context. Edward Conze's Buddhist Scriptures is a useful collection ...

An Introduction to Indian Philosophy

Introducing the topics, themes and arguments of the most influential Hindu and Buddhist Indian philosophers, An Introduction to Indian Philosophy leads the reader through the main schools of Indian thought from the origins of Buddhism to the Saiva Philosophies of Kashmir. By covering Buddhist philosophies before the Brahmanical schools, this engaging introduction shows how philosophers from the Brahmanical schools-including Samkhya, Yoga, Nyaya, Vaisheshika, and Mimamsa, as well as Vedanta-were to some extent responding to Buddhist viewpoints. Together with clear translations of primary texts, this fully-updated edition features: • A glossary of Sanskrit terms • A guide to pronunciation • Chronological list of philosophers & works With study tools and constant reference to original texts, An Introduction to Indian Philosophy provides students with deeper understanding of the foundations of Indian philosophy.

Buddhist Philosophy

(1982) Selfless Persons. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Ganeri, Jonardon. (2007) The Concealed Art of the Soul: Theories of Self and Practices of Truth in Indian Ethics and Epistemology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Buddhist Philosophy

The Buddhist philosophical tradition is vast, internally diverse, and comprises texts written in a variety of canonical languages. It is hence often difficult for those with training in Western philosophy who wish to approach this tradition for the first time to know where to start, and difficult for those who wish to introduce and teach courses in Buddhist philosophy to find suitable textbooks that adequately represent the diversity of the tradition, expose students to important primary texts in reliable translations, that contextualize those texts, and that foreground specifically philosophical issues. Buddhist Philosophy fills that lacuna. It collects important philosophical texts from each major Buddhist tradition. Each text is translated and introduced by a recognized authority in Buddhist studies. Each introduction sets the text in context and introduces the philosophical issues it addresses and arguments it presents, providing a useful and authoritative guide to reading and to teaching the text. The volume is organized into topical sections that reflect the way that Western philosophers think about the structure of the discipline, and each section is introduced by an essay explaining Buddhist approaches to that subject matter, and the place of the texts collected in that section in the enterprise. This volume is an ideal single text for an intermediate or advanced course in Buddhist philosophy, and makes this tradition immediately accessible to the philosopher or student versed in Western philosophy coming to Buddhism for the first time. It is also ideal for the scholar or student of Buddhist studies who is interested specifically in the philosophical dimensions of the Buddhist tradition.

Critical Terms for the Study of Buddhism

The Category of the Person: Anthropology, Philosophy, History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Collins, Steven. 1982. Selfless Persons: Imagery and Thought in Therava ̄da Buddhism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Critical Terms for the Study of Buddhism

Over the past century, Buddhism has come to be seen as a world religion, exceeding Christianity in longevity and, according to many, philosophical wisdom. Buddhism has also increasingly been described as strongly ethical, devoted to nonviolence, and dedicated to bringing an end to human suffering. And because it places such a strong emphasis on rational analysis, Buddhism is considered more compatible with science than the other great religions. As such, Buddhism has been embraced in the West, both as an alternative religion and as an alternative to religion. This volume provides a unique introduction to Buddhism by examining categories essential for a nuanced understanding of its traditions. Each of the fifteen essays here shows students how a fundamental term—from art to word—illuminates the practice of Buddhism, both in traditional Buddhist societies and in the realms of modernity. Apart from Buddha, the list of terms in this collection deliberately includes none that are intrinsic to the religion. Instead, the contributors explore terms that are important for many fields and that invite interdisciplinary reflection. Through incisive discussions of topics ranging from practice, power, and pedagogy to ritual, history, sex, and death, the authors offer new directions for the understanding of Buddhism, taking constructive and sometimes polemical positions in an effort both to demonstrate the shortcomings of assumptions about the religion and the potential power of revisionary approaches. Following the tradition of Critical Terms for Religious Studies, this volume is not only an invaluable resource for the classroom but one that belongs on the short list of essential books for anyone seriously interested in Buddhism and Asian religions.

The Journey into Wholeness for Single Mothers

Jesus' example is unconditional: a selfless act is focused on the other person's need. There are only two choices: selflessness or selfishness. If we do not embrace selflessness, we will selfishly focus on how we want to meet a need, ...

The Journey into Wholeness for Single Mothers

You are not alone. If you have taken The Transforming Journey of Truth, Hope, and Love for Single Mothers, those four words you are not alone resonate in your soul. Youre no longer a single mother feeling alone and lost on a dark road with no destination. Your personal journey has transformed you into a single mother in a Half Family who is standing on the borders of Wholeness. Only this transformation prepares you to embark on a new journey: The Journey into Wholeness for Single Mothers. Therefore, if you feel alone, torn apart by the harsh reality of life as a single mother, and long to be whole, choose to take the transforming journey first. Whether you are a single mother by separation, divorce, or an unwed pregnancy, you will discover the light of truth which exposes all the rough spots on your road, the hope to maneuver through these challenges, and the love that leads you to a new path. Standing on the borders of this new path, you discover the three secrets to wholeness, which reveal a narrow road. As we travel together, you will experience the glorious splendor of this journey with each deliberate, selfless, and sacrificial step, receive wonderful blessings, and see a glimpse of heaven.

Realisms Interlinked

8 Colin McGinn, Mental Content (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989). 9 For the most reliable and accessible account of this Buddhist view, see Steven Colins, Selfless Persons (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985).

Realisms Interlinked

This book brings together over 25 years of Arindam Chakrabarti's original research in philosophy on issues of epistemology, metaphysics, and philosophy of mind. Organized under the three basic concepts of a thing out there in the world, the self who perceives it, and other subjects or selves, his work revolves around a set of realism links. Examining connections between metaphysical stances toward the world, selves, and universals, Chakrabarti engages with classical Indian and modern Western philosophical approaches to a number of live topics including the refutation of idealism; the question of the definability of truth, and the possibility of truths existing unknown to anyone; the existence of non-conceptual perception; and our knowledge of other minds. He additionally makes forays into fundamental questions regarding death, darkness, absence, and nothingness. Along with conceptual clarification and progress towards alternative solutions to these substantial philosophical problems, Chakrabarti demonstrates the advantage of doing philosophy in a cosmopolitan fashion. Beginning with an analysis of the concept of a thing, and ending with an analysis of the concept of nothing, Realisms Interlinked offers a preview of a future metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of mind without borders.

Great Success Formula for Life

A successful person is an achiever. A great successful person is an achiever and a selfless giver. If you ask anybody whether they want to be successful or unsuccessful, you will find that nobody wants to be unsuccessful.

Great Success Formula for Life

Do you aspire to become a great successful person and lead a great successful life by balancing both material and spiritual success? If yes, then, Mahan Yash-Sutra is for you. Here are the key points you can get from this book: The difference between success and great success. The formula for great success. The process of checking your progress. Questions you need to ask yourself: What you need to be, have, use, do, and account for and how you need to develop yourself. The seven areas of self-development.

Language Texts and Society

“An Alternative Social History of the Self,” in The Category of the Person, ed. Michael Carrithers, Steven Collins, ... Selfless Persons: Imagery and Thought in Theravåda Buddhism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. _____. 1998.

Language  Texts  and Society