Seneca s Characters

Unsurprisingly, Seneca's Thyestes also differs from Atreus in displaying two personae rather than a single distinct one over the course of the tragedy. Scholars have often remarked that Thyestes grows steadily to resemble Atreus the ...

Seneca s Characters

The first full-length study of fictional character in Senecan tragedy, focusing on issues of coherence, imitation, appearance and autonomy.

Seeing Seneca Whole

COSMIC DISRUPTION IN SENECA'S THYESTES: TWO WAYS OF LOOKING AT AN ECLIPSE Katharina Volk One of the most striking features of the plot of Seneca's Thyestes is the reversal of the sun: at the sight of the title character's grisly banquet ...

Seeing Seneca Whole

This volume contains ten essays on Seneca the Younger. Approaching the Roman writer from various angles, the authors endeavor both to illuminate individual aspects of Seneca’s enormous output and to discern common themes among the different genres practiced by him.

Seneca s Drama

of Thyestes' insecurity. This is accomplished skillfully in a lyric soliloquy (anapests) in which Thyestes tries to put aside the unhappy memories of his past but is unable to feel secure. The festive garland slips from his head, ...

Seneca s Drama

With insight and clarity, Norman Pratt makes available to the general reader an understanding of the major elements that shaped Seneca's plays. These he defines as Neo-Stoicism, declamatory rhetoric, and the chaotic, violent conditions of Senecan society. Seneca's drama shows the nature of this society and uses freely the declamatory rhetorical techniques familiar to any well-educated Roman. But the most important element, Pratt argues, is Neo-Stoicism, including technical aspects of this philosophy that previously have escaped notice. With these ingredients Seneca transformed the themes and characters inherited from Greek drama, casting them in a form that so radically departs from the earlier drama that Seneca's plays require a different mode of criticism. "The greatest need in the criticism of this drama is to understand its legitimacy as drama of a new kind in the anicent tradition," Pratt writes. "It cannot be explained as an inferior imitation of Greek tragedy because, though inferior, it is not imitative in the strict sense of the word and has its own nature and motivation." Pratt shows the functional interrelationship among philosophy, rhetoric, and "society" in Seneca's nine plays and assesses the plays' dramatic qualities. He finds that however melodramatic the plays may seem to the modern reader, Seneca's own career as Nero's mentor, statesman, and spokesman was scarcely less tumultuous than the lives of his characters. When the Neo-Stoicism and rhetoric of the plays are charged with Seneca's own tortured, passionate life, Pratt concludes, "The result is inevitably melodrama, melodrama of such energy and force that it changed the course of Western drama." Originally published in 1983. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

Seneca

Thyestes, Seneca's only tragedy without a real female character, is not at first glance a very promising place to look for gender conflict. Beyond the opening scene in which Furia drives the ghost of Tantalus to infect the royal palace, ...

Seneca

Seneca was a man of many facets: statesman, dramatist, philosopher, prose stylist. His life was marked by extremes of fortune - extremes that are reflected in much of his writing, and in the vicissitudes of his reputation in later centuries. This volume brings together some outstanding essays written about him over the past four decades, and illustrates the diversity of approaches by which modern critics have attempted to understand this multifaceted figure. Just as Seneca's writings often reflect his times, so current critical approaches often reflect issues in contemporary thought and society. Several of the essays have been revised by their authors for this volume, and two of them are translated for the first time. A new introduction places the articles within the context of recent academic thought and criticism. All Latin has been translated.

John Crowne

229 Seneca, Thyestes, lines 1-121—Crowne, Works, II, 17-19. 230 Seneca, Thyestes, Act II—Crowne, Works, II, 24-26. 231 Seneca, Thyestes, Act II, lines 391-403—Works, II, 26-7. 232 Seneca, Thyestes, lines 225-233—Works, II, 38.

John Crowne

Originally published in 1922, this book gives an account of the life and dramatic works of the now little known and less studied Restoration playwright, John Crowne. The study consists of three parts. In the first, the author has traced the life of Crowne more minutely than has hitherto been attempted. In the second discusses Crowne's plays' the date of production and publication, the circumstances connected with the writing, the sources, and the manner in which they are used. Finally, the third part is a critical summary of Crowne's tragedies and comedies and an estimate of his importance as a playwright.

Early Modern Drama at the Universities

Laying Down the Thyestean Gauntlet : Seneca Sets His Followers a Challenge his own . 236 Why did Marston , and many other early modern English authors find in Seneca's Thyestes such a source of inspiration ? What was it about this play ...

Early Modern Drama at the Universities

This is the first history of Oxford and Cambridge drama in the Tudor and Stuart period. It guides the reader through the theatrical experiences of students at university in early modern England and follows the students on the journey from schoolboys to scholars to graduates in the workplace. Early Modern Drama at the Universities is structured to make the subject as accessible as possible, mitigating the difficulties of this sizeable and complex body of evidence. The hundreds of plays that we have inherited from Oxford and Cambridge are steeped in Classical culture, and the academic establishment's bias against print culture means that most evidence remains in manuscript form. Opening up these plays to a wider readership, this study carves three main roads into the corpus, introducing key institutions, intertexts, and individuals. For the first time, we can see the extent to which institutional culture made the drama what it is: pedagogically-inspired, homosocial, and self-reflexive. Early Modern Drama at the Universities argues that it was primarily on a college level that students lived, worked, and proved themselves to the community, and that if we are to understand university drama as a whole, we must create it from the building blocks of individual college histories.

Brill s Companion to Seneca

D Despite the uncertainty pertaining to the tragedies' chronology, the broadly accepted theory of dating Thyestes to Seneca's last years (about 62 ) is based on stylistic and metrical grounds (Fitch 1981), on features of the Chorus ...

Brill s Companion to Seneca

The volume contains a comprehensive survey of each genuine or attributed work of Seneca in the style of concise handbook articles (“Works”). The cultural background (“Context”) and the most important problem areas within the philosophic and tragic corpus of Seneca are dealt with in fuller presentations (“Topics”).

Ancient Scripts and Modern Experience on the English Stage 1500 1700

Thyestes have summoned Oedipus's self-possessed dignity, or would he have suffered the physical anguish of Philoctetes?), but it was to Seneca's Thyestes that Crowne looked for the general disposition of his plot and for a third of his ...

Ancient Scripts and Modern Experience on the English Stage  1500 1700

Unlike the contrast between the sacred and the taboo, the opposition of "comic" and "tragic" is not a way of categorizing experience that we find in cultures all over the world or even at different periods in Western civilization. Though medieval writers and readers distinguished stories with happy endings from stories with unhappy endings, it was not until the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries--fifteen hundred years after Sophocles, Euripides, Plautus, and Terence had last been performed in the theaters of the Roman Empire--that tragedy and comedy regained their ancient importance as ways of giving dramatic coherence to human events. Ancient Scripts and Modern Experience on the English Stage charts that rediscovery, not in the pages of scholars' books, but on the stages of England's schools, colleges, inns of court, and royal court, and finally in the public theaters of sixteenth-and seventeenth-century London. In bringing to imaginative life the scripts, eyewitness accounts, and financial records of these productions, Bruce Smith turns to the structuralist models that anthropologists have used to explain how human beings as social creatures organize and systematize experience. He sets in place the critical, physical, and social structures in which sixteenth-and seventeenth-century Englishmen watched productions of classical comedy and classical tragedy. Seen in these three contexts, these productions play out a conflict between classical and medieval ways of understanding and experiencing comedy's interplay between satiric and romantic impulses and tragedy's clash between individuals and society. Originally published in 1988. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Roman Theatre

5 What do you think of Seneca's decision to end the play the way he does? What kinds of decisions would you make if you were given the opportunity to direct Seneca's Thyestes? Other plays attributed to Seneca In addition to Thyestes, ...

Roman Theatre

An exciting series that provides students with direct access to the ancient world by offering new translations of extracts from its key texts.

Seneca s Tragedies and the Aesthetics of Pantomime

The first scene of the fifth act of the Thyestes features a monologue by Atreus (885–919) and most probably a monologue (in lyric metre, 920–69) by Thyestes; in fact, the manuscript tradition is not in agreement in the assignment of ...

Seneca s Tragedies and the Aesthetics of Pantomime

Pantomime was arguably the most popular dramatic genre during the Roman Empire, but has been relatively neglected by literary critics. Seneca's Tragedies and the Aesthetics of Pantomime adds to our understanding of Seneca's tragic art by demonstrating that elements which have long puzzled scholars can be attributed to the influence of pantomime. The work argues that certain formal features which depart from the conventions of fifth-century Attic drama can be explained by the influence of, and interaction with, this more popular genre. The work includes a detailed and systematic analysis of the specific pantomime-inspired features of Seneca's tragedies: the loose dramatic structure, the presence of “running commentaries” (minute descriptions of characters undergoing emotional strains or performing specific actions), of monologues of self-analysis, and of narrative set-pieces. Relevant to the culture of Roman imperial culture more generally, Seneca's Tragedies and the Aesthetics of Pantomime includes an outline of the general features of pantomime as a genre. The work shows that the influence of sub-literary-genres such as pantomime and mime, the sister art of pantomime, can be traced in several Roman writers whose literary production was antecedent or contemporary with Seneca's. Furthermore, the work sheds light on the interaction between sub-literary genres of a performative nature such as mime and pantomime and more literary ones, an aspect of Latin culture which previous scholarship has tended to overlook. Seneca's Tragedies and the Aesthetics of Pantomime provides an original contribution to the understanding of the impact of pantomime on Roman literary culture and of controversial and little-understood features of Senecan tragedies.

Renaissance Revivals

Like Seneca's other tragedies , Thyestes shares many characteristics with revenge tragedy — sensational and bloody horrors , noble characters in a court setting , a ghost , a revenge plot involving trickery , a final banquet , sexual ...

Renaissance Revivals

Renaissance Revivals examines patterns in the London revivals of two English Renaissance theatre genres over the past four centuries. Griswold's focus on revenge tragedies and city comedies illuminates the ongoing interaction between society and its cultural products. No cultural object is ever created anew, she argues, but is instead constructed from existing cultural genres and conventions, the visions and professional needs of the artist, and the interests of an audience. Thus, every "new play" is in part a renaissance and every "revival" is in part an entirely new cultural object.

After 69 CE Writing Civil War in Flavian Rome

A Fury setting in motion a cycle of crime within a royal family or igniting strife between brothers inevitably reminds the post-Senecan reader of the Fury from the prologue of Seneca's Thyestes, setting in motion the renewed strife ...

After 69 CE   Writing Civil War in Flavian Rome

The fall of Nero and the civil wars of 69 CE ushered in an era scarred by the recent conflicts; Flavian literature also inherited a rich tradition of narrating nefas from its predecessors who had confronted and commemorated the traumas of Pharsalus and Actium. Despite the present surge of scholarly interest in both Flavian literary studies and Roman civil war literature, however, the Flavian contribution to Rome’s literature of bellum ciuile remains understudied. This volume shines a spotlight on these neglected voices. In the wake of 69 CE, writing civil war became an inescapable project for Flavian Rome: from Statius’s fraternas acies and Silius’s suicidal Saguntines to the internecine narratives detailed in Josephus’s Bellum Iudaicum and woven into Frontinus’s exempla, Flavian authors’ preoccupation with civil war transcends genre and subject matter. This book provides an important new chapter in the study of Roman civil war literature by investigating the multi-faceted Flavian response to this persistent and prominent theme.

Roman Drama and its Contexts

is that Valerius, appreciating perhaps the diachronic value of Seneca's portrait of the ideal king in the Thyestes, used it in a rather discreet and creative way in order to 'update' (with a Stoic flavouring) the character ...

Roman Drama and its Contexts

Roman plays have been well studied individually (even including fragmentary or spurious ones more recently). However, they have not always been placed into their ‘context’, though plays (just like items in other literary genres) benefit from being seen in context. This edited collection aims to address this issue: it includes 33 contributions by an international team of scholars, discussing single plays or Roman dramatic genres (including comedy, tragedy and praetexta, from both the Republican and imperial periods) in contexts such as the literary tradition, the relationship to works in other literary genres, the historical and social situation, the intellectual background or the later reception. Overall, they offer a rich panorama of the role of Roman drama or individual plays in Roman society and literary history. The insights gained thereby will be of relevance to everyone interested in Roman drama or literature more generally, comparative literature or drama and theatre studies. This contextual approach has the potential of changing the way in which Roman drama is viewed.

The Fragility of Power

One is certainly Seneca's Thyestes. Thyestes was one of Nero's favorite tragic roles.11 Whether his interest in this tragic subject implied identification with either of the play's main characters (Atreus or Thyestes) is not clear.

The Fragility of Power

Statius' narrative of the fraternal strife of the Theban brothers Eteocles and Polynices has had a profound influence on Western literature and fascinated generations of scholars and readers. This book studies in detail the poem's view of power and its interaction with historical contexts. Written under Domitian and in the aftermath of the civil war of 69 CE, the Thebaid uses the veil of myth to reflect on the political reality of imperial Rome. The poem offers its contemporary readers, including the emperor, a cautionary tale of kingship and power. Rooted in a pessimistic view of human beings and human relationships, the Thebaid reflects on the harsh necessity of monarchical power as the only antidote to a world always on the verge of returning to chaos. While humans, and especially kings, are fragile and often the prey of irrational passions, the Thebaid expresses the hope that an illuminated sovereign endowed with clementia (mercy) may offer a solution to the political crisis of the Roman empire. Statius' narrative also responds to Domitian's problematic interaction with the emperor Nero, whom Domitian regarded as both a negative model and a secret source of inspiration. With The Fragility of Power, Stefano Rebeggiani offers thoughtful parallels between the actions of the Thebaid and the intellectual activities and political views formulated by the groups of Roman aristocrats who survived Nero's repression. He argues that the poem draws inspiration from an initial phase in Domitian's regime characterized by a positive relationship between the emperor and the Roman elite. Statius creates a number of innovative strategies to negotiate elements of continuity between Domitian and Nero, so as to show that, while Domitian recuperated aspects of Nero's self-presentation, he was no second Nero. Statius' poem interacts with aspects of imperial ideology under Domitian: Statius' allusions to the stories of Phaethon and Hercules engage Domitian's use of solar symbols and his association with Hercules. This book also shows that the Thebaid adapts previous texts (in particular Lucan's Bellum Civile) in order to connect the mythical subject of its narrative with the historical experience of civil war in Rome in 69 CE. By moving past recent solely aesthetic readings of the Thebaid, The Fragility of Power offers a serious and thoughtful addition to the recent scholarship in Statian studies.

The Oxford Handbook of Tudor Literature

When Pelops died, his sons Atreus and Thyestes battled over the kingdom. Atreus gained the crown, but Thyestes seduced Atreus' wife and stole a golden fleece, which would secure the throne for him. Seneca's Thyestes begins at this point ...

The Oxford Handbook of Tudor Literature

This is the first major collection of essays to look at the literature of the entire Tudor period, from the reign of Henry VII to death of Elizabeth I. It pays particularly attention to the years before 1580. Those decades saw, amongst other things, the establishment of print culture and growth of a reading public; the various phases of the English Reformation and process of political centralization that enabled and accompanied them; the increasing emulation of Continental and classical literatures under the influence of humanism; the self-conscious emergence of English as a literary language and determined creation of a native literary canon; the beginnings of English empire and the consolidation of a sense of nationhood. However, study of Tudor literature prior to 1580 is not only of worth as a context, or foundation, for an Elizabethan 'golden age'. As this much-needed volume will show, it is also of artistic, intellectual, and cultural merit in its own right. Written by experts from Europe, North America, and the United Kingdom, the forty-five chapters in The Oxford Handbook to Tudor Literature recover some of the distinctive voices of sixteenth-century writing, its energy, variety, and inventiveness. As well as essays on well-known writers, such as Philip Sidney or Thomas Wyatt, the volume contains the first extensive treatment in print of some of the Tudor era's most original voices.

Senecan Tragedy and the Reception of Augustan Poetry

101 While these recollections to the fourth Eclogue may be more subtle, they may be just as important as a way to understand how a later reader identified a subversive intertext already present in Seneca's Thyestes.

Senecan Tragedy and the Reception of Augustan Poetry

In their practice of aemulatio, the mimicry of older models of writing, the Augustan poets often looked to the Greeks: Horace drew inspiration from the lyric poets, Virgil from Homer, and Ovid from Hesiod, Callimachus, and others. But by the time of the great Roman tragedian Seneca, the Augustan poets had supplanted the Greeks as the "classics" to which Seneca and his contemporaries referred. Indeed, Augustan poetry is a reservoir of language, motif, and thought for Seneca's writing. Strangely, however, there has not yet been a comprehensive study revealing the relationship between Seneca and his Augustan predecessors. Christopher Trinacty's Senecan Tragedy and the Reception of Augustan Poetry is the long-awaited answer to the call for such a study. Senecan Tragedy and the Reception of Augustan Poetry uniquely places Senecan tragedy in its Roman literary context, offering a further dimension to the motivations and meaning behind Seneca's writings. By reading Senecan tragedy through an intertextual lens, Trinacty reveals Seneca's awareness of his historical moment, in which the Augustan period was eroding steadily around him. Seneca, looking back to the poetry of Horace, Virgil, and Ovid, acts as a critical interpreter of both their work and their era. He deconstructs the language of the Augustan poets, refiguring it through the perspective of his tragic protagonists. In doing so, he positions himself as a critic of the Augustan tradition and reveals a poetic voice that often subverts the classical ethos of that tradition. Through this process of reappropriation Seneca reveals much about himself as a playwright and as a man: In the inventive manner in which he re-employs the Augustan poets' language, thought, and poetics within the tragic framework, Seneca gives his model works new--and uniquely Senecan--life. Trinacty's analysis sheds new light both on Seneca and on his Augustan predecessors. As such, Senecan Tragedy and the Reception of Augustan Poetry promises to be a groundbreaking contribution to the study of both Senecan tragedy and Augustan poetry.

Apocalypse and Golden Age

If Seneca and Lucan are “poets of the apocalypse,” this fact is in some ways a response to their “golden age” ... Similarly, the final ode of Seneca's Thyestes repositions Vergil's hopes in Eclogue 4 that “the final age has come” and ...

Apocalypse and Golden Age

How did the ancient Greeks and Romans envision the end of the world? What is the long-term future of the human race? Will the world always remain as it is or will it undergo a catastrophic change? What role do the gods, human morality, and the forces of nature play in bringing about the end of the world? In Apocalypse and Golden Age, Christopher Star reveals the answers that Greek and Roman authors gave to these questions. The first large-scale investigation of the various scenarios for the end of the world in classical texts, this book demonstrates that key thinkers often viewed their world as shaped by catastrophe. Star focuses on how this theme was explored over the centuries in the works of poets, such as Hesiod, Vergil, Ovid, and Lucan, and by philosophers, including the Presocratics, Plato, Epicurus, Lucretius, Cicero, and Seneca. With possibilities ranging from periodic terrestrial catastrophes to the total dissolution of the world, these scenarios address the ultimate limits that define human life and institutions, and place humanity in the long perspective of cosmic and natural history. These texts also explore various options for the rebirth of society after world catastrophe, such as a return of the Golden Age or the redevelopment of culture and political institutions. Greek and Roman visions of the end, Star argues, are not calls to renounce this world and prepare for a future kingdom. Rather, they are set within larger investigations that examine and seek to improve personal and political life in the present. Contextualizing classical thought about the apocalypse with biblical studies, Star shows that the seeds of our contemporary anxieties about globalization, politics, and technology were sown during the Roman period. Even the prevalent link between an earthly leader and the beginning of the end times can be traced back to Greek and Roman rulers, the emperor Nero in particular. Apocalypse and Golden Age enriches our understanding of apocalyptic thought.

Seneca Hercules Furens

Schmidt, P.L. “Rezeption und Überlieferung der Tragödien Senecas bis zum Ausgang des Mittelalters", in: E. Lefèvre (Hrsg.), ... Seidensticker, B. “Maius solitus: Senecas Thyestes und die tragoedia rhetorica", A&A 31 (1985) 116-136.

Seneca   Hercules Furens

The most comprehensive study of Seneca's Hercules Furens; it provides a new text with translation, a detailed commentary on the dramaturgy and language of the play and elucidates the figure of Roman Hercules in relation to its Euripidean model.

Grazer Beitr ge

It is the contention of this paper that Seneca's Stoicism explains as much about his dramatic practice as it does about his dramatic meaning . This thesis will be tested on Seneca's Thyestes . The Thyestes has received a greater variety ...

Grazer Beitr  ge