Sevastopol 1942

Von Manstein’s triumph

Sevastopol 1942

In late July 1941, Hitler ordered Army Group South to seize the Crimea as part of its operations to secure the Ukraine and the Donets Basin, in order to protect the vital Romanian oil refineries at Ploesti from Soviet air attack. After weeks of heavy fighting, the Germans breached the Soviet defenses and overran most of the Crimea. By November 1941 the only remaining Soviet foothold in the area was the heavily fortified naval base at Sevastopol. Operation Sturgeon Haul, the final assault on Sevastopol, was one of the very few joint service German operations of World War II, with two German corps and a Romanian corps supported by a huge artillery siege train, the Luftwaffe's crack VIII Flieger Korps and a flotilla of S-Boats provided by the Kriegsmarine. This volume closely examines the impact of logistics, weather and joint operational planning upon the last major German victory in World War II (1939-1945).

The Defence of Sevastopol, 1941–1942

The Soviet Perspective

The Defence of Sevastopol, 1941–1942

In December 1941, while America was reeling from the attack on Pearl Harbor and the offensives of the German Army Groups North and Centre were stalled in the mud and cold of the Russian winter, the German Eleventh Army encircled the vast fortress of Sevastopol in the Crimea, launching massive combined air, artillery and land attacks against the heavily defended positions. One of the most remarkable campaigns in the history of modern warfare had begun, and this is the subject of Clayton Donnells graphic and highly readable new study. Drawing on his expert knowledge of the history of modern fortifications, he describes the design and development of the Red Armys formidable base at Sevastopol. But he concentrates on the sequence of attacks mounted by the Wehrmacht on the strongpoints protecting the city. The forts and bunkers had to be taken one by one after devastating artillery and air attacks, the casualties on both sides were severe, and this brutal struggle went on for over six months. Using documentary records and a range of personal accounts, Clayton Donnell reconstructs the events and experience of the campaign in vivid detail.

Sevastopol’s Wars

Crimea from Potemkin to Putin

Sevastopol’s Wars

Founded by Catherine the Great, the maritime city of Sevastopol has been fought over for centuries. Crucial battles of the Crimean War were fought on the hills surrounding the city, and the memory of this stalwart defence inspired those who fruitlessly battled the Germans during World War II. Twice the city has faced complete obliteration yet twice it has risen, phoenix-like, from the ashes. In this groundbreaking volume, award-winning author Mungo Melvin explores how Sevastopol became the crucible of conflict over three major engagements – the Crimean War, the Russian Civil War and World War II – witnessing the death and destruction of countless armies yet creating the indomitable 'spirit of Sevastopol'. By weaving together first-hand interviews, detailed operational reports and battle analysis, Melvin creates a rich tapestry of history.

World War II Sea War, Vol 5: Air Raid Pearl Harbor. This Is Not a Drill

World War II Sea War, Vol 5: Air Raid Pearl Harbor. This Is Not a Drill

In Volume 5, the United States officially enters the war. Highlights of this action-filled volume include: Minute-by-minute detail of Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor; Japanese attacks on Wake Island, Luzon, Hong Kong, Malaya, Burma, etc., early attacks by US Navy subs in the Pacific; Russian Black Sea Fleet landing troops in the Crimea; continuing naval struggle in the Mediterranean; German U-boat attacks along the US Atlantic coast; Japanese attacks on US Pacific coast; American-British-Dutch-Australian Command battles the superior forces of the Imperial Japanese Navy; and the Battle of the Java Sea and the Battle of Sunda Strait.

6538

Siege of Sevastopol and the Crimea Campaign 1941-1942

6538

This volume by Hans Seidler tells of the ferocious battle between German and Russian forces during World War II. Brimming with photographs this work takes the reader through Erich von Manstein's campaign to capture the naval fortress of Sevastapol.

Sevastopol, November, 1941--July, 1942

Articles, Stories, and Eye-witness Accounts by Soviet War-correspondents

Sevastopol, November, 1941--July, 1942


Lady Death

The Memoirs of Stalin's Sniper

Lady Death

The wartime memoir of Lyudmila Pavlichenko is a remarkable document: the publication of an English language edition is a significant coup. Pavlichenko was World War II's best scoring sniper and had a varied wartime career that included trips to England and America. In June 1941, when Hitler launched Operation Barbarossa, she left her university studies, ignored the offer of a position as a nurse, to become one of Soviet Russia's 2000 female snipers. Less than a year later she had 309 recorded kills, including 29 enemy sniper kills. She was withdrawn from active duty after being injured. She was also regarded as a key heroic figure for the war effort. She spoke at rallies in Canada and the US and the folk singer Woody Guthrie wrote a song, 'Killed By A Gun' about her exploits. Her US trip included a tour of the White House with FDR. In November 1942 she visited Coventry and accepted donations of £4,516 from Coventry workers to pay for three X-ray units for the Red Army. She also visited a Birmingham factory as part of her fundraising tour. She never returned to combat but trained other snipers. After the war, she finished her education at Kiev University and began a career as a historian. She died on October 10, 1974 at age 58, and was buried in Moscow's Novodevichy Cemetery.

Turizm

The Russian and East European Tourist Under Capitalism and Socialism

Turizm

'Turizm' examines the history of tourism in Russia and eastern Europe from the tsarist period to the age of Soviet and east European mass tourism in the 1960s and 1970s.