Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century

This book integrates themes of gender and sexuality into a broader understanding of the Church of England in the eighteenth century.

Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century

The Long Eighteenth Century was the Age of Revolutions, including the first sexual revolution. In this era, sexual toleration began and there was a marked increase in the discussion of morality, extra-marital sex, pornography and same-sex relationships in both print and visual culture media. William Gibson and Joanne Begiato here consider the ways in which the Church of England dealt with sex and sexuality in this period. Despite the backdrop of an increasingly secularising society, religion continued to play a key role in politics, family life and wider society and the eighteenth-century Church was still therefore a considerable force, especially in questions of morality. This book integrates themes of gender and sexuality into a broader understanding of the Church of England in the eighteenth century. It shows that, rather than distancing itself from sex through diminishing teaching, regulation and punishment, the Church not only paid attention to it, but its attitudes to sex and sexuality were at the core of society's reactions to the first sexual revolution.

Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century

The Long Eighteenth Century was the Age of Revolutions, including the first sexual revolution.

Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century

The Long Eighteenth Century was the Age of Revolutions, including the first sexual revolution. In this era, more tolerant sexual attitudes prevailed and there was a marked increase in the discussion of morality, extra-marital sex, pornography and same-sex relationships in both print and visual culture. William Gibson and Joanne Begiato here consider the ways in which the Church of England dealt with sex and sexuality in this period.

After Marriage in the Long Eighteenth Century

Jennie Batchelor is Professor of Eighteenth-Century Studies at the University of Kent. She has published widely on ... She has just completed a book titled Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century with co-author Prof.

After Marriage in the Long Eighteenth Century

This book examines the intersections between the ways that marriage was represented in eighteenth-century writing and art, experienced in society, and regulated by law. The interdisciplinary and comparative essays explore the marital experience beyond the ‘matrimonial barrier’ to encompass representations of married life including issues of spousal abuse, parenting, incest, infidelity and the period after the end of marriage, to include annulment, widowhood and divorce. The chapters range from these focuses on legal and social histories of marriage to treatments of marriage in eighteenth-century periodicals, to depictions of married couples and families in eighteenth-century art, to parallels in French literature and diaries, to representations of violence and marriage in Gothic novels, and to surveys of same-sex partnerships. The volume is aimed towards students and scholars working in the long eighteenth century, gender studies, women’s writing, publishing history, and art and legal historians.

Anti Methodism and Theological Controversy in Eighteenth Century England

Gibson , William , and Begiato , Joanne , Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century : Religion , Enlightenment and the Sexual Revolution ( London , 2017 ) . Gillespie , Michele , and Beachy , Robert ( eds ) , Pious Pursuits ...

Anti Methodism and Theological Controversy in Eighteenth Century England

Eighteenth-century Methodism was a divisive phenomenon which attracted a torrent of printed opposition, especially from Anglican clergymen. Yet, most of these opponents have been virtually forgotten. Anti-Methodism and Theological Controversy in Eighteenth-Century England is the first large-scale examination of the theological ideas of early anti-Methodist authors.

Sex in an Old Regime City

For an important revisionist correction, see William Gibson and Joanne Begiato, Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century: Religion, Enlightenment and the Sexual Revolution (London: I. B Taurus, 2017). Historians of France have ...

Sex in an Old Regime City

Our ideas about the long histories of young couples' relationships and women's efforts to manage their reproductive health are often premised on the notion of a powerful sexual double standard. In Sex in an Old Regime City, Julie Hardwick offers a major reframing of the history of young people's intimacy. Based on legal records from the city of Lyon, Hardwick uncovers the relationships of young workers before marriage and after pregnancy occurred, even if marriage did not follow, and finds that communities treated these occurrences without stigmatizing or moralizing. She finds a hidden world of strategies young couples enacted when they faced an untimely pregnancy. If they could not or would not marry, they sometimes tried to terminate pregnancies, to make the newborn go away by a variety of measures, or to charge the infant to local welfare institutions. Far from being isolated, couples drew on the resources of local communities and networks. Clerics, midwives, wet nurses, landladies, lawyers, parents, and male partners in and outside the city offered pragmatic, sympathetic ways to help young, unmarried pregnant women deal with their situations and hold young men responsible for the reproductive consequences of their sexual activity. This was not merely emotional work; those involved were financially compensated. These support systems ensured that the women could resume their jobs and usually marry later, without long-term costs. In doing so, communities managed and minimized the disruptions and consequences even of cases of abandonment and unprosecuted infanticide. This richly textured study re-thinks the ways in which fundamental issues of intimacy and gendered power were entwined with families, communities, and religious and secular institutions at all levels from households to neighborhoods to the state.

Law and Government in England during the Long Eighteenth Century

Thereareoccasional signs ofspecial constables inthe early eighteenth century–for examplein 1729 three husbandmenwere ... of personal behaviourtendedto diminish after 1700, especiallyinregard to church attendance andextramarital sex.

Law and Government in England during the Long Eighteenth Century

Over the long eighteenth century English governance was transformed by large adjustments to the legal instruments and processes of power. This book documents and analyzes these shifts and focuses upon the changing relations between legal authority and the English people.

Law Lawyers and Litigants in Early Modern England

In the eighteenth century, disciplinary presentments declined substantially, perhaps because of this success in winning ... Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century: Religion, Enlightenment and the Sexual Revolution (London, ...

Law  Lawyers and Litigants in Early Modern England

Explores the impact of legal ideas and legal consciousness on early modern English society and culture.

Christianity and Sexuality in the Early Modern World

... 1996); Faramerz Dabhoiwala, The Origins of Sex: A History of the First Sexual Revolution (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012); William Gibson and Joanne Begiato, Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century: Religion, ...

Christianity and Sexuality in the Early Modern World

Christianity and Sexuality in the Early Modern World surveys the ways in which people from the time of Luther and Columbus to that of Thomas Jefferson used Christian ideas and institutions to regulate and shape sexual norms and conduct, and examines the impact of their efforts. Global in scope and geographic in organization, the book contains chapters on Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa and Asia, and North America. It explores key topics, including marriage and divorce, fornication and illegitimacy, clerical sexuality, same-sex relations, witchcraft and love magic, moral crimes, and inter-racial relationships. The book sets its findings within the context of many historical fields, including the history of gender and sexuality, and of colonialism and race. Each chapter in this third edition has been updated to reflect new scholarship, particularly on the actual lived experience of people around the world. This has resulted in expanded coverage of nearly every issue, including notions of the body and of honor, gendered religious symbols, religious and racial intermarriage, sexual and gender fluidity, the process of conversion, the interweaving of racial identity and religious ideologies, and the role of Indigenous and enslaved people in shaping Christian traditions and practices. It is ideal for students of the history of sexuality, early modern Christianity, and early modern gender.

Female Husbands

Godbeer, Sexual Revolution, 66–7; William Gibson and Joanne Begiato, Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century (London: I.B. Tauris, 2017), 195–231. 13. Arthur N. Gilbert, “Buggery and the British Navy, 1700–1861,” Journal of ...

Female Husbands

A timely and comprehensive history of female husbands in Anglo-America from the eighteenth through the turn of the twentieth century.

Teleology and Modernity

... 2012 and J. van Eijnatten, Preaching, Sermon and Cultural Change in the Long Eighteenth Century, Leiden: Brill, ... Caritas Anglicana, London: Mowbray, 1912; Gibson and Begiato, Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century.

Teleology and Modernity

The main and original contribution of this volume is to offer a discussion of teleology through the prism of religion, philosophy and history. The goal is to incorporate teleology within discussions across these three disciplines rather than restrict it to one as is customarily the case. The chapters cover a wide range of topics, from individual teleologies to collective ones; ideas put forward by the French aristocrat Arthur de Gobineau and the Scottish philosopher David Hume, by the Anglican theologian and founder of Methodism, John Wesley, and the English naturalist Charles Darwin.

Samuel Wesley and the Crisis of Tory Piety 1685 1720

In the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries , the views that Wesley and other Tory Anglicans adopted were soteriological ... W. Gibson and J. Begiato , Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century , London , IB Tauris ...

Samuel Wesley and the Crisis of Tory Piety  1685 1720

Samuel Wesley and the Crisis of Tory Piety, 1685-1720 uses the experiences of Samuel Wesley (1662-1735) to examine what life was like in the Church of England for Tory High Church clergy. These clergy felt alienated from the religious and political settlement of 1689 and found themselves facing the growth of religious toleration. They often linked this to a rise in immorality and a sense of the decline in religious values. Samuel Wesley's life saw a series of crises including his decision to leave Dissent and conform to the Church of England, his imprisonment for debt in 1705, his shortcomings as a priest, disagreements with his bishop, his marriage breakdown and the haunting of his rectory by a ghost or poltergeist. Wesley was also a leading member of the Convocation of the Church during the crisis years of 1710-14. In each of these episodes, Wesley's Toryism and High Church principles played a key role in his actions. They also show that the years between 1685 and 1720 were part of a 'long Glorious Revolution' which was not confined to 1688-9. This 'long Revolution' was experienced by Tory High Church clergy as a series of turning points in which the Whig forces strengthened their control of politics and the Church. Using newly discovered sources, and providing fresh insights into the life and work of Samuel Wesley, William Gibson explores the world of the Tory High Church clergy in the period 1685-1720.

The Imposteress Rabbit Breeder

Simon Dickie, Cruelty and Laughter: Forgotten Comic Literature and the Unsentimental Eighteenth Century (Chicago: ... 302–25; William Gibson and Joanne Begiato, Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century (London: I. B.Taurus, ...

The Imposteress Rabbit Breeder

In October 1726, newspapers began reporting a remarkable event. In the town of Godalming in Surrey, a woman called Mary Toft had started to give birth to rabbits. Several leading doctors - some sent directly by King George I - travelled to examine the woman and she was moved to London to be closer to them. By December, she had been accused of fraud and taken into custody. Mary Toft's unusual deliveries caused a media sensation. Her rabbit births were a test case for doctors trying to further their knowledge about the processes of reproduction and pregnancy. The rabbit births prompted not just public curiosity and scientific investigation, but also a vicious backlash. Based on extensive new archival research, this book is the first in-depth re-telling of this extraordinary story. Karen Harvey situates the rabbit-births within the troubled community of Godalming and the women who remained close to Mary Toft as the case unfolded, exploring the motivations of the medics who examined her, considering why the case attracted the attention of the King and powerful men in government, and following the case through the criminal justice system. The case of Mary Toft exposes huge social and cultural changes in English history. Against the backdrop of an incendiary political culture, it was a time when traditional social hierarchies were shaken, relationships between men and women were redrawn, print culture acquired a new vibrancy and irreverence, and knowledge of the body was remade. But Mary Toft's story is not just a story about the past. In reconstructing Mary's physical, social and mental world, The Imposteress Rabbit Breeder allows us to reflect critically on our own ideas about pregnancy, reproduction, and the body through the lens of the past.

The Formal and Informal Politics of British Rule In Post Conquest Quebec 1760 1837

Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century: Religion, Enlightenment and the Sexual Revolution (London: I.B. Tauris, 2017). Gilbert, Arthur N. “The Africaine Courts-Martial: A Study of Buggery and the Royal Navy,” Journal of ...

The Formal and Informal Politics of British Rule In Post Conquest Quebec  1760 1837

Nancy Christie innovatively and significantly transforms the writing of Quebec history between 1763 and 1837 by locating Quebec within new British practices of imperial governance asserted in the wake of the Seven Years War. Breaking with the conventional master-narrative of the era as one of gradual integration between French- and English-speaking communities, accompanied by incremental political and social liberalization, Nancy Christie presents the six decades following the Conquest as a period of assertive British strategies for assimilating Quebec's French and Catholic majority, and refurbished authoritarianism deployed to arrest the spread of revolution in the Atlantic world. Brilliantly advanced, this new narrative of post-Conquest Quebec builds upon entirely new research meticulously gleaned from over 20,000 cases from the criminal and civil judicial archives and a sustained examination of both official and unofficial political and social discourses. This study charts both the British practices of colonial rule, which sought the assimilation of non-British 'others' through both formal modes of law and governance, and the consumption of British manufactured goods, and the contestation of these through the daily resistance of ordinary men and women. In so doing, Christie identifies Quebec as a case study with which to open a new trajectory in the wider study of the British Empire. Her striking conclusion urges a shift in historical focus from the interaction between European colonizers and racialized others, to the centrality of practices of rule designed to govern European subaltern peoples.

The Game of Love in Georgian England

Mills, and Randolph Trumbach, eds., A Gay History of Britain: Love and Sex Between Men Since the Middle Ages (Oxford, ... and William Gibson and Joanne Begiato, Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century (London and New York, ...

The Game of Love in Georgian England

Courtship in Georgian England was a decisive moment in the life cycle, imagined as a tactical game, an invigorating sport, and a perilous journey across a turbulent sea. This volume brings to life the emotional experience of courtship using the words and objects selected by men and women to navigate this potentially fraught process. It provides new insights into the making and breaking of relationships, beginning with the formation of courtships using the language of love, the development of intimacy through the exchange of love letters, and sensory engagement with love tokens such as flowers, portrait miniatures, and locks of hair. It also charts the increasing modernization of romantic customs over the Georgian era - most notably with the arrival of the printed valentine's card - revealing how love developed into a commercial industry. The book concludes with the rituals of disintegration when engagements went awry, and pursuit of damages for breach of promise in the civil courts. The Game of Love in Georgian England brings together love letters, diaries, valentines, and proposals of marriage from sixty courtships sourced from thirty archives and museum collections, alongside an extensive range of sources including ballads, conduct literature, court cases, material objects, newspaper reports, novels, periodicals, philosophical discourses, plays, poems, and prints, to create a vivid social and cultural history of romantic emotions. The book demonstrates the importance of courtship to studies of marriage, relationships, and emotions in history, and how we write histories of emotions using objects. Love emerges as something that we do in practice, enacted by couples through particular socially and historically determined rituals.

Law and Society in England 1750 1950

Three Centuries of Maternal Mortality in “the World We Have Lost”' in L Bonfield, R Smith and K Wrightson (eds), The World We Have Gained: ... Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century (IB Tauris, 2017).

Law and Society in England 1750 1950

Law and Society in England 1750–1950 is an indispensable text for those wishing to study English legal history and to understand the foundations of the modern British state. In this new updated edition the authors explore the complex relationship between legal and social change. They consider the ways in which those in power themselves imagined and initiated reform and the ways in which they were obliged to respond to demands for change from outside the legal and political classes. What emerges is a lively and critical account of the evolution of modern rights and expectations, and an engaging study of the formation of contemporary social, administrative and legal institutions and ideas, and the road that was travelled to create them. The book is divided into eight chapters: Institutions and Ideas; Land; Commerce and Industry; Labour Relations; The Family; Poverty and Education; Accidents; and Crime. This extensively referenced analysis of modern social and legal history will be invaluable to students and teachers of English law, political science, and social history.

Thomas Wride and Wesley s Methodist Connexion

Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century: Religion, Enlightenment and the Sexual Revolution. London and New York, NY: I.B. Tauris, 2017. Gibson, William, Peter S. Forsaith, and Martin Wellings, eds.

Thomas Wride and Wesley   s Methodist Connexion

This book highlights the life and writings of an itinerant preacher in John Wesley’s Methodist Connexion, Thomas Wride (1733-1807). Detailed studies of such rank and file preachers are rare, as Methodist history has largely been written by and about its leadership. However, Wride’s ministry shows us that the development of this worldwide movement was more complicated and uncertain than many accounts suggest. Wride’s attitude was distinctive. He was no respecter of persons, freely criticising almost everyone he came across, and in doing so exposing debates and tensions within both Methodism and wider society. However, being so combative also led him into conflict with the very movement he sought to promote. Wride is an authentic, self-educated, and non-élite voice that illuminates important features of Eighteenth-Century life well beyond his religious activities. He sheds light on his contemporaries’ attitudes to issues such as the role of women, attitudes towards and the practice of medicine, and the experience and interpretation of dreams and supernatural occurrences. This is a detailed insight into the everyday reality of being an Eighteenth-Century Methodist minister. As such, this text will be of interest to academics working in Methodist Studies and Religious History, as well as Eighteenth-Century History more generally.

Biblical Sterne

Rhetoric and Religion in the Shandyverse Ryan J. Stark ... Studies in EighteenthCentury Culture 34 (2005): 197–269. Gibson, William and Joanne Begiato. Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century. London: Bloomsbury, 2017.

Biblical Sterne

Is Laurence Sterne one of the great Christian apologists? Ryan Stark recommends him as such, perhaps to the detriment of the parson's roguish reputation. The book's aim, however, is not to dispel roguishness but rather to discern the theological motives behind Sterne's comic rhetoric, from Tristram Shandy and the sermons to A Sentimental Journey. To this end, Stark reveals a veritable avalanche of biblical themes and allusions to be found in Sterne, often and seemingly awkwardly in the middle of sex jokes, and yet the effect is not to produce irreverence. On the contrary, we find an irreverently reverent apologetic, Stark argues, and a priest who knows how to play gracefully with religious ideas. Through Sterne, in fact, we might rethink humour's role in the service of religion.

Early Modern Prophecies in Transnational National and Regional Contexts SET 3 volumes

He specialises in the history of religion and politics in the period 1660–1900. ... of the British Sermon, 1689–1901 (Oxford: 2012) and author, with Joanne Begiato, of Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century (IB Tauris: 2017).

Early Modern Prophecies in Transnational  National and Regional Contexts  SET   3 volumes

Laborie and Hessayon bring rare prophetic and millenarian texts to an international audience by presenting sources from all over Europe (broadly defined), and across the early modern period in English for the first time.

Ecclesiastical Law Clergy and Laity

William Gibson and Joanna Begiato, Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century. Religion, Enlightenment and the Sexual Revolution (I. B. Tauris 2017) 115–18. Banister v Thompson, Arches [1908] P372. Bruce S. Bennett, “Banister v ...

Ecclesiastical Law  Clergy and Laity

Discipline in an ecclesiastical context can be defined as the power of a church to maintain order among its members on issues of morals or doctrine. This book presents a scholarly engagement with the way in which legal discipline has evolved within the Church of England since 1688. It explores how the Church of England, unusually among Christian churches, has come to be without means of effective legal discipline in matters of controversy, whether liturgical, doctrinal, or moral. The author excludes matters of blatant scandal to focus on issues where discipline has been attempted in controversial matters, focussing on particular cases. The book makes connections between law, the state of the Church, and the underlying theology of justice and freedom. At a time when doctrinal controversy is widespread across all Christian traditions, it is argued that the Church of England has an inheritance here in need of cherishing and sharing with the universal Church. The book will be a valuable resource for academics and researchers in the areas of law and religion, and ecclesiastical history. .

Early Modern Emotions

She has previously published on ideas about virtue and courtesy in fifteenth and sixteenthcentury England, ... She is currently working on two book projects: Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century with her coauthor Professor ...

Early Modern Emotions

Early Modern Emotions is a student-friendly introduction to the concepts, approaches and sources used to study emotions in early modern Europe, and to the perspectives that analysis of the history of emotions can offer early modern studies more broadly. The volume is divided into four sections that guide students through the key processes and practices employed in current research on the history of emotions. The first explains how key terms and concepts in the study of emotions relate to early modern Europe, while the second focuses on the unique ways in which emotions were conceptualized at the time. The third section introduces a range of sources and methodologies that are used to analyse early modern emotions. The final section includes a wide-ranging selection of thematic topics covering war, religion, family, politics, art, music, literature and the non-human world to show how analysis of emotions may offer new perspectives on the early modern period more broadly. Each section offers bite-sized, accessible commentaries providing students new to the history of emotions with the tools to begin their own investigations. Each entry is supported by annotated further reading recommendations pointing students to the latest research in that area and at the end of the book is a general bibliography, which provides a comprehensive list of current scholarship. This book is the perfect starting point for any student wishing to study emotions in early modern Europe.