Sexual Life In Ancient Rome

First published in 2001. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Sexual Life In Ancient Rome

First published in 2001. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Sexual Life in Ancient Rome

It is quite mistaken to draw inferences from the constant occurrence of sexual symbolism in ancient art, and from the exaltation of sex in some ancient festivals, to some peculiar 'immortality' or 'depravity' in ancient times.

Sexual Life in Ancient Rome

First published in 2001. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Sexual Life In Ancient Rome

A man could live in concubinage with the woman of his choiceinstead of taking her to wife; but he was compelled to give notice of this to the authorities. This type of cohabitation was externally ... He 50 SEXUAL LIFE IN ANCIENT ROME 3.

Sexual Life In Ancient Rome

First published in 2001. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

History Of Bundling

First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

History Of Bundling

First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Leisure and Ancient Rome

Antiquity, trans. F. Pheasant, Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1988; O. Kiefer, Sexual Life in Ancient Rome, trans. G. and H. Highet, Panther, 1969; F. Dupont, Daily Life in Ancient Rome, trans. C. Woodall, Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1992; ...

Leisure and Ancient Rome

In this book Toner offers a new way of looking at Roman society at all levels, not just among the elite, by examining the imperial games and the baths as well as gambling, the taverns, theatre and carnivals.

The Politics of Immorality in Ancient Rome

This book should appeal to students and scholars of classical literature and ancient history. It will also attract anthropologists and social and cultural historians.

The Politics of Immorality in Ancient Rome

The decadence and depravity of the ancient Romans are a commonplace of serious history, popular novels and spectacular films. This book is concerned not with the question of how immoral the ancient Romans were but why the literature they produced is so preoccupied with immorality. The modern image of immoral Rome derives from ancient accounts which are largely critical rather than celebratory. Upper-class Romans habitually accused one another of the most lurid sexual and sumptuary improprieties. Historians and moralists lamented the vices of their contemporaries and mourned for the virtues of a vanished age. Far from being empty commonplaces these assertions constituted a powerful discourse through which Romans negotiated conflicts and tensions in their social and political order. This study proceeds by a detailed examination of a wide range of ancient texts (all of which are translated) exploring the dynamics of their rhetoric, as well as the ends to which they were deployed. Roman moralising discourse, the author suggests, may be seen as especially concerned with the articulation of anxieties about gender, social status and political power. Individual chapters focus on adultery, effeminacy, the immorality of the Roman theatre, luxurious buildings and the dangers of pleasure. This book should appeal to students and scholars of classical literature and ancient history. It will also attract anthropologists and social and cultural historians.

Roman Homosexuality Ideologies of Masculinity in Classical Antiquity

This book provides a thoroughly documented discussion of ancient Roman ideologies of masculinity and sexuality with a focus on ancient representations of sexual experience between males.

Roman Homosexuality   Ideologies of Masculinity in Classical Antiquity

This book provides a thoroughly documented discussion of ancient Roman ideologies of masculinity and sexuality with a focus on ancient representations of sexual experience between males. It gathers a wide range of evidence from the second century B.C. to the second century A.D.--above all from such literary texts as courtroom speeches, love poetry, philosophy, epigram, and history, but also graffiti and other inscriptions as well as artistic artifacts--and uses that evidence to reconstruct the contexts within which Roman texts were created and had their meaning. The book takes as its starting point the thesis that in order to understand the Roman material, we must make the effort to set aside any preconceptions we might have regarding sexuality, masculinity, and effeminacy. Williams' book argues in detail that for the writers and readers of Roman texts, the important distinctions were drawn not between homosexual and heterosexual, but between free and slave, dominant and subordinate, masculin and effeminate as conceived in specifically Roman terms. Other important questions addressed by this book include the differences between Roman and Greek practices and ideologies; the influence exerted by distinctively Roman ideals of austerity; the ways in which deviations from the norms of masculine sexual practice were negotiated both in the arena of public discourse and in real men's lives; the relationship between the rhetoric of "nature" and representations of sexual practices; and the extent to which same-sex marriages were publicly accepted.

Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome

It is multidimensional, appearing in the Roman sources as deity, as core civic virtue, as psychological state, ... with paternalistic authority over the sex lives of other people, with personal vulnerability, andwithmuchmore.

Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome

Traditionally, scholars have approached Roman sexuality using categories of sexual ethics drawn from contemporary, Western society. In this 2006 book Dr Langlands seeks to move away from these towards a deeper understanding of the issues that mattered to the Romans themselves, and the ways in which they negotiated them, by focusing on the untranslatable concept of pudicitia (broadly meaning 'sexual virtue'). She offers a series of nuanced close readings of texts from a wide spectrum of Latin literature, including history, oratory, love poetry and Valerius Maximus' work Memorable Deeds and Sayings. Pudicitia emerges as a controversial and unsettled topic, at the heart of Roman debates about the difference between men and women, the relation between mind and body, and the ethics of power and status differentiation within Roman culture. The book develops strategies for approaching the study of an ancient culture through sensitive critical readings of its literary productions.

Spectacles of Death in Ancient Rome

Otto Kiefer, Sexual Life in Ancient Rome (London: Abbey Library, 1934) 106. Kiefer's classic study, 99—106, sees the Romans as 'cruel by nature', a 'morbid' and 'sadistic' nation, who expressed their will to power as sadism in sex and ...

Spectacles of Death in Ancient Rome

The elaborate and inventive slaughter of humans and animals in the arena fed an insatiable desire for violent spectacle among the Roman people. Donald G. Kyle combines the words of ancient authors with current scholarly research and cross-cultural perspectives, as he explores * the origins and historical development of the games * who the victims were and why they were chosen * how the Romans disposed of the thousands of resulting corpses * the complex religious and ritual aspects of institutionalised violence * the particularly savage treatment given to defiant Christians. This lively and original work provides compelling, sometimes controversial, perspectives on the bloody entertainments of ancient Rome, which continue to fascinate us to this day.

Just Love

This by no means signals a view that other religious and cultural traditions are not important to the history of the ... Attitudes and Practice23 Ancient Greece and Rome shared a general acceptance of sex as a natural part of life .

Just Love

Examines the sexual beliefs and practices of different religions, cultures, genders, and relationships to propose a modern-day framework on the topic that is more focused on love rather than sex.

Same Sex Desire and Love in Greco Roman Antiquity and in the Classical Tradition of the West

Print in Transition, 1850-1910: Studies in Media and Book History. London: Palgrave. ... Intimate Matters: A History of Sexuality in America. ... The Politics of Latin Literature: Writing, Identity, and Empire in Ancient Rome.

Same Sex Desire and Love in Greco Roman Antiquity and in the Classical Tradition of the West

New and surprising insights into homoeroticism of times past In ancient times, the Greek god Eros personified both heterosexual and homosexual attractions. Same-Sex Desire and Love in Greco-Roman Antiquity and in Classical Tradition of the West explores the homosexual side of the vanished civilizations of Greece and Rome, and the resulting influence on the Classical tradition of the West. Respected scholars clearly present evidence that shows the extensive nature of homoeroticism and homosexuality in the Classical world. Iconography such as vase decoration and carved gemstones is presented in photographs, and the text includes an examination of a wide selection of literature of the times with an eye to opening new vistas for future study. Same-Sex Desire and Love in Greco-Roman Antiquity and in Classical Tradition of the West lays to rest the myths generally accepted as truth about Greco-Roman views on homosexuality and brings fresh insights to philological and historical scholarship. This book provides nuanced, humanistic discussions on the common phenomena of same-sex desire. Topics include Greek pederasty and its origins, the Greek female homoeroticism of Sappho, homosexuality in Greek and Roman art and literature, and the emergence of the gay liberation movement with the influence of discussions of Greek and Roman homosexuality in the twentieth century. The text is extensively referenced and includes helpful notation. Same-Sex Desire and Love in Greco-Roman Antiquity and in Classical Tradition of the West provides a comprehensive table of abbreviations, subject index, and index of names and terms. It discusses in detail: the integral role athletic nudity played in athlete-trainer pederasty the central role of pederasty in Greek history, politics, art, literature, and learning tracing the history of the Ganymede myth how the athletic culture of Sparta contributed to the spread of pederasty in Greece homosexuality in Boeotia in contrast to the rest of Greece the homoeroticism of Sappho dispelling generally accepted myths prevalent about Roman sexuality Roman visual representations of homosexuality as evidence of prevailing attitudes homoerotic connotations in literature and philosophy of the Italian Renaissance the effect of German classical philology on gay scholarship English Romantic poets and the importance of male love in their lives the Uranians’ use of allusions and themes from ancient Greece the building of intellectual community through gay print culture—through the use of Greece and Rome as models and more Same-Sex Desire and Love in Greco-Roman Antiquity and in Classical Tradition of the West is essential reading for Classicists, specialists in gender/sexuality studies, humanists interested in the classical tradition in Western culture, psychologists, and other social scientists in human sexuality.

A Mind of Its Own

24: “'In Greece,' Michel Foucault wrote”: Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality: An Introduction (New York: Vintage ... Roman Sexualities (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1997); Otto Kiefer, Sexual Life in Ancient Rome ...

A Mind of Its Own

Whether enemy or ally, demon or god, the source of satisfaction or the root of all earthly troubles, the penis has forced humanity to wrestle with its enduring mysteries. Here, in an enlightening and entertaining cultural study, is a book that gives context to the central role of the penis in Western civilization. A man can hold his manhood in his hand, but who is really gripping whom? Is the penis the best in man -- or the beast? How is man supposed to use it? And when does that use become abuse? Of all the bodily organs, only the penis forces man to confront such contradictions: something insistent yet reluctant, a tool that creates but also destroys, a part of the body that often seems apart from the body. This is the conundrum that makes the penis both hero and villain in a drama that shapes every man -- and mankind along with it. In A Mind of Its Own, David M. Friedman shows that the penis is more than a body part. It is an idea, a conceptual but flesh-and-blood measuring stick of man's place in the world. That men have a penis is a scientific fact; how they think about it, feel about it, and use it is not. It is possible to identify the key moments in Western history when a new idea of the penis addressed the larger mystery of man's relationship with it and changed forever the way that organ was conceived of and put to use. A Mind of Its Own brilliantly distills this complex and largely unexamined story. Deified by the pagan cultures of the ancient world and demonized by the early Roman church, the organ was later secularized by pioneering anatomists such as Leonardo da Vinci. After being measured "scientifically" in an effort to subjugate some races while elevating others, the organ was psychoanalyzed by Sigmund Freud. As a result, the penis assumed a paradigmatic role in psychology -- whether the patient was equipped with the organ or envied those who were. Now, after being politicized by feminism and exploited in countless ways by pop culture, the penis has been medicalized. As no one has before him, Friedman shows how the arrival of erection industry products such as Viagra is more than a health or business story. It is the latest -- and perhaps final -- chapter in one of the longest sagas in human history: the story of man's relationship with his penis. A Mind of Its Own charts the vicissitudes of that relationship through its often amusing, occasionally alarming, and never boring course. With intellectual rigor and a healthy dose of wry humor, David M. Friedman serves up one of the most thought-provoking, significant, and readable cultural works in years.

Roman Sex

"John R. Clarke, one of the world's foremost authorities on ancient Rome, puts these works of art back into their original context--whether in the home, brothel, or banquet table--and reveals ancient Roman attitudes on sex and sexuality.The ...

Roman Sex

Roman Sex provides a fresh and provocative account of ancient Roman sexual practices. Featuring 114 illustrations, including 95 full-color plates, Roman Sex explains for the first time a wealth of newly discovered sexual art including many paintings, sculptures, and vases hidden away in the world's "secret museums."John R. Clarke, one of the world's foremost authorities on ancient Rome, puts these works of art back into their original context--whether in the home, brothel, or banquet table--and reveals ancient Roman attitudes on sex and sexuality.The first Women's Liberation movement also took place in this period, and Clarke explains how and when it came about. He shows how and why the Roman man was a bisexual creature, alternating his affections between women and men, and how society treated the entrenched homosexual. Lesbian sex, illustrated by startling new discoveries at Pompeii, also gets full treatment.Romans, both rich and poor, proudly displayed images in their homes that today we would hide away. Clarke takes the reader into a society markedly different from ours in its attitudes toward sex. With all its quirks, it was a sexually tolerant society that encouraged the creation and open display of erotic art. Roman Sex will appeal to any reader who wants to understand this culture, which was in many ways the forerunner of our own.

The Sorrows of the Ancient Romans

899 - 905 ; Kiefer , Sexual Life in Ancient Rome , p . 80 . 45 One can compare this to the experience of a modern audience watching a match between two old or debilitated boxers : the members of the audience feel ashamed and embarrassed ...

The Sorrows of the Ancient Romans

This inquiry into the collective psychology of the ancient Romans speaks not about military conquest, sober law, and practical politics, but about extremes of despair, desire, and envy. Carlin Barton makes us uncomfortably familiar with a society struggling at or beyond the limits of human endurance. To probe the tensions of the Roman world in the period from the first century b.c.e. through the first two centuries c.e., Barton picks two images: the gladiator and the "monster."

The Legacy of Ancient Rome in the Russian Silver Age

Sulla's political activity dates to the years 88-79 B.C., that is, some 700 years after the legendary foundation of Rome (754 B.C.), (ab urbe condita). ... Otto Kieffer, Sexual Life in Ancient Rome, trans. Gilbert and Helen Highet ...

The Legacy of Ancient Rome in the Russian Silver Age

For poets throughout the world Rome was the world. This is particularly true for Russian poets, owing to the anagrammatical relation of the words Rome and mir (Rome and world). The legacy of ancient Rome has always constituted an important component of the Russian cultural consciousness. The revitalization of classical scholarship in nineteenth-century Russia and new approaches to antiquity prompted many of the Russian Symbolists to seek their inspiration in ancient Rome. Vladimir Solovyov, Dmitry Merezhkovsky, Valery Bryusov, Vyacheslav Ivanov, Maksimilian Voloshin, Vasily Komarovsky, and Mikhail Kuzmin all made significant contributions to what is often referred to as the “Roman text.” The Legacy of Ancient Rome in the Russian Silver Age analyzes the forms involved in creating the Roman image and explores its functionality within the given poetic system. In addition to the formal analysis, the background and the stimulus leading up to the composition of a particular poem are explored, as well as allusions to legends, myths and Rome’s geography and architecture. Moreover, this study considers the function of the Roman text in Russian Symbolist poetics and the works of the individual poets. Finally, the relation between the Roman and Petersburg texts of Russian literature is explored, since many of the Russian Symbolist poets found in Rome a perfect metaphor for their studies of the city and “urban” poetry.

Sex and Difference in Ancient Greece and Rome

“ The sexual status of Vestal Virgins , ” Journal of Roman Studies , 70 : 12–27 . Beard , M. 1995. ... A preface to the history of declamation . ” In T. Habinek and A. Schiesaro ( eds ) , The Roman Cultural Revolution .

Sex and Difference in Ancient Greece and Rome

This volume collects and introduces some of the best writing on sexual behaviour and gender differences in ancient Greece and Rome including four chapters newly translated from German and French. For centuries discussions of sexuality and gender in the ancient world, if they took place at all, focussed on how the roles and spheres of the sexes were divided. While men occupied the public sphere of the community, ranged through the Greek and Roman worlds and participated in politics, courts, theatre and sport, women kept to the home. Sex occupied a separate sphere, in scholarly terms restricted to specialists in ancient medicine. And then the subjects were transformed, first by Sir Kenneth Dover, then by Michel Foucault.This book charts and illustrates the extraordinary evolution of scholarly investigation of a once hidden aspect of the ancient world. In doing so it sheds light on fascinating and curious aspects of ancient lives and thought.

Roman Women

Keppie, L., Understanding Roman Inscriptions, (London 1991) Kiefer, O., Sexual Life in Ancient Rome, (London 1934) King, H., 'Producing Woman: Hippocratic Gynaecology' in Archer, Women in Ancient Societies pp.

Roman Women


Prostitution Sexuality and the Law in Ancient Rome

and then proceed to the arena of political and civic life , 14 from which women were formally excluded . Cult The participation of Roman women in religion was structured in a manner that reflects deeply embedded notions about the ...

Prostitution  Sexuality  and the Law in Ancient Rome

This is a study of the legal rules affecting the practice of female prostitution at Rome approximately from 200 B.C. to A.D. 250. It examines the formation and precise content of the legal norms developed for prostitution and those engaged in this profession, with close attention to their social context. McGinn's unique study explores the fit between the law-system and the socio-economic reality while shedding light on important questions concerning marginal groups, marriage, sexual behavior, the family, slavery, and citizen status, particularly that of women.