Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome

A 2006 study of Roman sexuality and sexual ethics focusing on the crucial and unsettled concept of pudicitia.

Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome

A 2006 study of Roman sexuality and sexual ethics focusing on the crucial and unsettled concept of pudicitia.

Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome

A 2006 study of Roman sexuality and sexual ethics focusing on the crucial and unsettled concept of pudicitia.

Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome

A 2006 study of Roman sexuality and sexual ethics focusing on the crucial and unsettled concept of pudicitia.

Exemplary Ethics in Ancient Rome

Yet for the ancient Romans too, hearing the blood-soaked stories of their ancestral heroes was an intimate and potent experience, and this 'taste of the hero's blood' had an intoxicating effect similar to the blood of Warner's dragon: ...

Exemplary Ethics in Ancient Rome

This ground-breaking study conveys the thrill and moral power of the ancient Roman story-world and its ancestral tales of bloody heroism. Its account of 'exemplary ethics' explores how and what Romans learnt from these moral exempla, arguing that they disseminated widely not only core values such as courage and loyalty, but also key ethical debates and controversies which are still relevant for us today. Exemplary ethics encouraged controversial thinking, creative imitation, and a critical perspective on moral issues, and it plays an important role in Western philosophical thought. The model of exemplary ethics developed here is based on a comprehensive survey of Latin literature, and its innovative approach also synthesizes methodologies from disciplines such as contemporary philosophy, educational theory, and cultural memory studies. It offers a new and robust framework for the study of Roman exempla that will also be valuable for the study of moral exempla in other settings.

Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome

McGinn, T. A. (1992) 'The senatus consultum from Larinum and the repression of adultery at Rome', ZPE 93: 273–95. (1998) Prostitution, Sexuality and the Law in Ancient Rome.NewYork. McGuire, D. T. (1997) Actsof Silence: CivilWar, ...

Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome

Traditionally, scholars have approached Roman sexuality using categories of sexual ethics drawn from contemporary, Western society. In this 2006 book Dr Langlands seeks to move away from these towards a deeper understanding of the issues that mattered to the Romans themselves, and the ways in which they negotiated them, by focusing on the untranslatable concept of pudicitia (broadly meaning 'sexual virtue'). She offers a series of nuanced close readings of texts from a wide spectrum of Latin literature, including history, oratory, love poetry and Valerius Maximus' work Memorable Deeds and Sayings. Pudicitia emerges as a controversial and unsettled topic, at the heart of Roman debates about the difference between men and women, the relation between mind and body, and the ethics of power and status differentiation within Roman culture. The book develops strategies for approaching the study of an ancient culture through sensitive critical readings of its literary productions.

Sexual Life In Ancient Rome

First published in 2001. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Sexual Life In Ancient Rome

First published in 2001. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Politics of Immorality in Ancient Rome

This book is concerned not with the question of how immoral the ancient Romans were but why the literature they produced is so preoccupied with immorality.

The Politics of Immorality in Ancient Rome

The decadence and depravity of the ancient Romans are a commonplace of serious history, popular novels and spectacular films. This book is concerned not with the question of how immoral the ancient Romans were but why the literature they produced is so preoccupied with immorality. The modern image of immoral Rome derives from ancient accounts which are largely critical rather than celebratory. Upper-class Romans habitually accused one another of the most lurid sexual and sumptuary improprieties. Historians and moralists lamented the vices of their contemporaries and mourned for the virtues of a vanished age. Far from being empty commonplaces these assertions constituted a powerful discourse through which Romans negotiated conflicts and tensions in their social and political order. This study proceeds by a detailed examination of a wide range of ancient texts (all of which are translated) exploring the dynamics of their rhetoric, as well as the ends to which they were deployed. Roman moralising discourse, the author suggests, may be seen as especially concerned with the articulation of anxieties about gender, social status and political power. Individual chapters focus on adultery, effeminacy, the immorality of the Roman theatre, luxurious buildings and the dangers of pleasure. This book should appeal to students and scholars of classical literature and ancient history. It will also attract anthropologists and social and cultural historians.

From Shame to Sin

At the center was sex. Kyle Harper examines how Christianity changed the ethics of sexual behavior from shame to sin, and shows how the roots of modern sexuality are grounded in an ancient religious revolution.

From Shame to Sin

The transformation of the Roman world from polytheistic to Christian is one of the most sweeping ideological changes of premodern history. At the center was sex. Kyle Harper examines how Christianity changed the ethics of sexual behavior from shame to sin, and shows how the roots of modern sexuality are grounded in an ancient religious revolution.

Sexual Life in Ancient Rome

Alongside theater reviews, production photographs, and critical commentary, the volume also includes essays written by practicing theater artists who have worked on the play.

Sexual Life in Ancient Rome

First published in 2001. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Exemplary Ethics in Ancient Rome

This ground-breaking study conveys the thrill and moral power of the ancient Roman story-world and its ancestral ... Her books include Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome (Cambridge, 2006) and Sex, Knowledge, and Receptions of the Past ...

Exemplary Ethics in Ancient Rome

This ground-breaking study conveys the thrill and moral power of the ancient Roman story-world and its ancestral tales of bloody heroism. Its account of 'exemplary ethics' explores how and what Romans learnt from these moral exempla, arguing that they disseminated widely not only core values such as courage and loyalty, but also key ethical debates and controversies which are still relevant for us today. Exemplary ethics encouraged controversial thinking, creative imitation, and a critical perspective on moral issues, and it plays an important role in Western philosophical thought. The model of exemplary ethics developed here is based on a comprehensive survey of Latin literature, and its innovative approach also synthesizes methodologies from disciplines such as contemporary philosophy, educational theory, and cultural memory studies. It offers a new and robust framework for the study of Roman exempla that will also be valuable for the study of moral exempla in other settings.

Prostitution Sexuality and the Law in Ancient Rome

Jusek, “Morality” = S. Jusek, “Sexual Morality and the Meaning of Prostitution in Finde-Siècle Vienna,” in J. Bremmer ed., From Sappho to De Sade: Moments in the History of Sexuality (London 1989) 123–142. Kampen, Image = N. Kampen, ...

Prostitution  Sexuality  and the Law in Ancient Rome

This is a study of the legal rules affecting the practice of female prostitution at Rome approximately from 200 B.C. to A.D. 250. It examines the formation and precise content of the legal norms developed for prostitution and those engaged in this profession, with close attention to their social context. McGinn's unique study explores the "fit" between the law-system and the socio-economic reality while shedding light on important questions concerning marginal groups, marriage, sexual behavior, the family, slavery, and citizen status, particularly that of women.

Literature and Culture in the Roman Empire 96 235

Discovers new connections and cross-fertilisations between different cultural, linguistic and religious communities in the Roman Empire.

Literature and Culture in the Roman Empire  96   235

Discovers new connections and cross-fertilisations between different cultural, linguistic and religious communities in the Roman Empire.

Ancient Rome and the Construction of Modern Homosexual Identities

She has worked on Exeter's acclaimed outreach project 'Sex and History', with which she co-curated an exhibition of Sir ... She is the author of Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome (Cambridge, 2006) and has published widely in the fields of ...

Ancient Rome and the Construction of Modern Homosexual Identities

Ancient Rome and the Construction of Modern Homosexual Identities explores the contested history of responses to Roman antiquity, covering areas such as literature, the visual arts, popular culture, scholarship, and pornography. From learned discussions of lesbian cunnilingus in Renaissance commentaries on Martial and Juvenal, to disgust at the sexual excesses of the emperors, to the use of Rome by the early sexologists, to modern pornographic films thatlinger on the bodies of gladiators and slaves, Rome has been central to homosexual desires and experiences. By interrogating the desires that create engagements with the classical past, the volume illuminatesboth classical reception and the history of sexuality.

Roman Homosexuality

Rebecca Langlands's recent monograph Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome is a detailed study of pudicitia arguing that the concept is flexible and multivalent, capable of being put to various uses in various Latin texts: in a word, ...

Roman Homosexuality

Ten years after its original publication, Roman Homosexuality remains the definitive statement of this interesting but often misunderstood aspect of Roman culture. Learned yet accessible, the book has reached both students and general readers with an interest in ancient sexuality. This second edition features a new foreword by Martha Nussbaum, a completely rewritten introduction that takes account of new developments in the field, a rewritten and expanded appendix on ancient images of sexuality, and an updated bibliography.

Death in Ancient Rome

Pornography and Representation in Ancient Greece and Rome ( Oxford 1992 ) ' Female desire and the discourse of empire ... Rebecca Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome ( Cambridge 2006 ) Lattimore , R. Themes in Greek and Latin Epitaphs ...

Death in Ancient Rome

For the Romans, the manner of a person's death was the most telling indication of their true character. Death revealed the true patriot, the genuine philosopher, even, perhaps, the great artist--and certainly the faithful Christian. Catharine Edwards draws on the many and richly varied accounts of death in the writings of Roman historians, poets, and philosophers, including Cicero, Lucretius, Virgil, Seneca, Petronius, Tacitus, Tertullian, and Augustine, to investigate the complex significance of dying in the Roman world. Death in the Roman world was largely understood and often literally viewed as a spectacle. Those deaths that figured in recorded history were almost invariably violent--murders, executions, suicides--and yet the most admired figures met their ends with exemplary calm, their last words set down for posterity. From noble deaths in civil war, mortal combat between gladiators, political execution and suicide, to the deathly dinner of Domitian, the harrowing deaths of women such as the mythical Lucretia and Nero's mother Agrippina, as well as instances of Christian martyrdom, Edwards engagingly explores the culture of death in Roman literature and history.

Literature and Culture in the Roman Empire 96 235

This book explores new ways of analysing interactions between different linguistic, cultural, and religious communities across the Roman Empire from the reign of Nerva to the Severans (96–235 CE).

Literature and Culture in the Roman Empire  96   235

This book explores new ways of analysing interactions between different linguistic, cultural, and religious communities across the Roman Empire from the reign of Nerva to the Severans (96–235 CE). Bringing together leading scholars in classics with experts in the history of Judaism, Christianity and the Near East, it looks beyond the Greco-Roman binary that has dominated many studies of the period, and moves beyond traditional approaches to intertextuality in its study of the circulation of knowledge across languages and cultures. Its sixteen chapters explore shared ideas about aspects of imperial experience - law, patronage, architecture, the army - as well as the movement of ideas about history, exempla, documents and marvels. As the second volume in the Literary Interactions series, it offers a new and expansive vision of cross-cultural interaction in the Roman world, shedding light on connections that have gone previously unnoticed among the subcultures of a vast and evolving Empire.

Floodgates

7. Rebecca Langlands, Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), 13. 8. Craig Williams, Roman Homosexuality (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999, 2010), passim; and Elizabeth Manwell, ...

Floodgates

Where Are We on the Prophetic Timetable? When Jesus’s disciples asked for His views on the end times, He pointed to the “days of Noah” as the key to unlock the timing of “the coming of the Son of Man.” But what exactly did He mean by that? Floodgates unravels precisely what happened in the Flood of Noah and explains why this important biblical event is so analogous to our day. By tracking humanity’s moral slide during Noah’s generation, we roll back the curtain on our own times in remarkable ways. We also discover a clear biblical paradigm for determining where we are on the prophetic timetable, based on the actual teachings of Jesus and the apostles. After reading Floodgates, you will know if the countdown to final judgment has already begun. Reflecting careful research and keen biblical insights, Floodgates reveals God’s righteous dealings with humanity and the fate that soon awaits those now in open rebellion against Him. Author David Parsons lays the axe to the root of this moral rebellion, found in the collapsing claims of Darwinian evolution. He also identifies God’s “end game”—His specific strategy—for how He wants to bring this present age to a close. As we draw nearer to that day, Jesus calls every believer to be salt and light in the world, warning people of the coming judgment and showing the way to eternal life in Him. This book is a powerful reminder that everyone has a choice to make concerning their ultimate destiny—and time is growing short.

The Sexual Constitution of Political Authority

A Companion to Greek and Roman Political Thought (Chichester: Blackwell) 422–439. Herodian of Antioch (1961) ... Langlands, R (2006) Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press). Lear, A and Cantarella, ...

The Sexual Constitution of Political Authority

While there is no shortage of studies addressing the state’s regulation of the sexual, research into the ways in which the sexual governs the state and its attributes is still in its infancy. The Sexual Constitution of Political Authority argues that there are good reasons to suppose that our understandings of state power quiver with erotic undercurrents. The book maintains, more specifically, that the relationship between ideas of political authority and male same-sex desire is especially fraught. Through a series of case studies where a statesman’s same-sex desire was put on trial (either literally or metaphorically) as a problem for the good exercise of public powers, the book shows the resilience and adaptability of cultural beliefs in the incompatibility between public office and male same-sex desire. Some of the case studies analysed are familiar ground for both political/constitutional history and the history of sexuality. The Sexual Constitution of Political Authority argues, however, that only by systematically reading questions of institutional politics and questions of sexuality through each other will we have access to the most interesting insights that a study of these trials can generate. Whether they involve obscure public officials or iconic rulers such as Hadrian and James I, these compelling fragments of queer history reveal that the disavowal of male same-sex desire has been, and partly remains, central to mainstream understandings of political authority.

The Oxford Handbook of New Testament Gender and Sexuality

Abandoned to Lust: Sexual Slander and Ancient Christianity. New York: Columbia University Press. Langlands, Rebecca. 2006. Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Lundhaug, Hugo. 2010.

The Oxford Handbook of New Testament  Gender  and Sexuality

Over several decades, scholarship in New Testament and early Christianity has drawn attention both to the ways in which ancient Mediterranean conceptions of embodiment, sexual difference, and desire were fundamentally different from modern ones and also to important lines of genealogical connection between the past and the present. The result is that the study of "gender" and "sexuality" in early Christianity has become an increasingly complex undertaking. This is a complexity produced not only by the intricacies of conflicting historical data, but also by historicizing approaches that query the very terms of analysis whereby we inquire into these questions in the first place. Yet at the same time, recent work on these topics has produced a rich and nuanced body of scholarly literature that has contributed substantially to our understanding of early Christian history and also proved relevant to ongoing theological and social debates. The Oxford Handbook of Gender and Sexuality in the New Testament provides a roadmap to this lively scholarly landscape, introducing both students and other scholars to the relevant problems, debates, and issues. Leading scholars in the field offer original contributions by way of synthesis, critical interrogation, and proposals for future questions, hypotheses, and research trajectories.

Popular Morality in the Early Roman Empire

1992) Homer's Ancient Readers. Princeton. Langlands, R. (2000) 'Gender and exemplarity in Valerius Maximus'. D.Phil.diss.: Universityof Cambridge. Langlands, R. (2006) Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome. Cambridge.

Popular Morality in the Early Roman Empire

Morality is one of the fundamental structures of any society, enabling complex groups to form, negotiate their internal differences and persist through time. In the first book-length study of Roman popular morality, Dr Morgan argues that we can recover much of the moral thinking of people across the Empire. Her study draws on proverbs, fables, exemplary stories and gnomic quotations, to explore how morality worked as a system for Roman society as a whole and in individual lives. She examines the range of ideas and practices and their relative importance, as well as questions of authority and the relationship with high philosophy and the ethical vocabulary of documents and inscriptions. The Roman Empire incorporated numerous overlapping groups, whose ideas varied according to social status, geography, gender and many other factors. Nevertheless it could and did hold together as an ethical community, which was a significant factor in its socio-political success.