Shakespeare Religion

Wolfgang Clemen«s The Development of Shakespeare's Imagery (1951)includes a valuable commentary on Shakespeare«s tempest-symbolism; and Kenneth Muir,writingof Pericles in Shakespeare as Collaborator (1960),responds, as didD.

Shakespeare   Religion

First Published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Shakespeare Religion

First Published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Shakespeare   Religion

First Published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Shakespeare and Religion

First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Shakespeare and Religion

First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Shakespeare s Religious Language

Hassel, R. Chris, Jr, 'Hamlet's Puritan style', Religion and the Arts 7–1/2 (2003): 103–28. Hatchett, Marion J., Commentary on the American Prayer Book, New York: Seabury Press, 1980. Hawkes, Terence, Shakespeare and the Reason, ...

Shakespeare s Religious Language

Religious issues and discourse are key to an understanding of Shakespeare's plays and poems. This dictionary discusses over 1000 words and names in Shakespeare's works that have a religious connotation. Its unique word-by-word approach allows equal consideration of the full nuance of each of these words, from 'abbess' to 'zeal'. It also gradually reveals the persistence, the variety, and the sophistication of Shakespeare's religious usage. Frequent attention is given to the prominence of Reformation controversy in these words, and to Shakespeare's often ingenious and playful metaphoric usage of them. Theological commonplaces assume a major place in the dictionary, as do overt references to biblical figures, biblical stories and biblical place-names; biblical allusions; church figures and saints.

Shakespeare s Religious Allusiveness

5 Nevertheless, when Sir Andrew and Sir Toby question Malvolio's status as Puritan, Maria's complete response ... somber, pretentious Latinate diction; self-righteousness; and hostility to bearbaiting (II.v.7–8) quickly matched certain ...

Shakespeare s Religious Allusiveness

Shakespeare's Religious Allusiveness complicates debates about whether Shakespeare's plays are fundamentally Protestant or Catholic in sympathy, challenging analyses that either find Protestant elements consistently undercutting Catholic motifs or, less often, discover evidence of the playwright's endorsement of Catholic doctrine and customs. Rather, Maurice Hunt argues that Shakespeare's syncretistic method of incorporating both Protestant and Catholic elements into his plays was singular among early modern English playwrights at a time when governmental and social tolerance of Protestantism in the theatre was high and criticism of stereotyped Catholicism was correspondingly rampant in drama. In-depth discussions of The Two Gentlemen of Verona, the Second Henriad, All's Well That Ends Well, Twelfth Night, and Othello reveal how Shakespeare allusively integrates Reformation Protestant and Roman Catholic motifs and systems of thought. This book sheds new light on the playwright's knowledge of and interest in Elizabethan and Jacobean religious debates over the nature of spiritual reformation, the efficacy of merit for redemption, and the operation of Providence. It will appeal not only to Shakespeare scholars but to those interested in the cultural history of the Reformation.

Seeming Knowledge

Faith and skepticism in the writings of Shakespeare

Seeming Knowledge

Faith and skepticism in the writings of Shakespeare

Shakespeare s Hybrid Faith

As Arthur Marotti writes, 'Any discussion of religion and Shakespeare is an overdetermined one, related, as it is, ... Writings of the Late Mr. Richard Simpson (London: Burns & Oats, 1899); W. S. Lilly, 'What was Shakespeare's Religion?

Shakespeare s Hybrid Faith

This book throws new light on the issue of the dramatist's religious orientation by dismissing sectarian and one-sided theories, tackling the problem from the angle of the variegated Elizabethan context recently uncovered by modern historians and theatre scholars. It is argued that faith was a quest rather than a quiet certainty for the playwright.

Shakespeare s Twenty First Century Economics

Henry V and, 112–13 The Merchant of Venice and, 59–60, 68, 70–71 A Midsummer Night's Dream and, 95-IO 3, ... 13–14, 73, 75 mercy and justice and, 75–92. nature and, 7–8, 14 religion and, 8, 14 Shakespeare and, Io-14, 204, 209, 2, ...

Shakespeare s Twenty First Century Economics

"I love you according to my bond," says Cordelia to her father in King Lear. As the play turns out, Cordelia proves to be an exemplary and loving daughter. A bond is both a legal or financial obligation, and a connection of mutual love. How are these things connected? In As You Like It, Shakespeare describes marriage as a "blessed bond of board and bed": the emotional, religious, and sexual sides of marriage cannot be detached from its status as a legal and economic contract. These examples are the pith of Frederick Turner's fascinating new book. Based on the proven maxim that "money makes the world go round," this engaging study draws from Shakespeare's texts to present a lexicon of common words, as well as a variety of familiar familial and cultural situations, in an economic context. Making constant recourse to well-known material from Shakespeare's plays, Turner demonstrates that the terms of money and value permeate our minds and lives even in our most mundane moments. His book offers a new, humane, evolutionary economics that fully expresses the moral, spiritual, and aesthetic relationships among persons, and between humans and nature. Playful and incisive, Turner's book offers a way to engage the wisdom of Shakespeare in everyday life in a trenchant prose that is accessible to lovers of Shakespeare at all levels.

Heterodox Shakespeare

Dawson, “Shakespeare and Secular Performance,” 83. 7. Paul Stevens, “Hamlet, Henry VIII, and the Question of Religion: A Post-Secular Perspective,” in Shakespeare and Early Modern Religion, ed. David Loewenstein and Michael Witmore ...

Heterodox Shakespeare

The last quarter century has seen a “turn to religion” in Shakespeare studies as well as competing assertions by secular critics that Shakespeare’s plays reflect profound skepticism and even dismissal of the truth claims of revealed religion. This divide, though real, obscures the fact that Shakespeare often embeds both readings within the same play. This book is the first to propose an accommodation between religious and secular readings of the plays. Benson argues that Shakespeare was neither a mere debunker of religious orthodoxies nor their unquestioning champion. Religious inquiry in his plays is capacious enough to explore religious orthodoxy and unorthodoxy, everything from radical belief and the need to tolerate religious dissent to the possibility of God’s nonexistence. Shakespeare’s willingness to explore all aspects of religious and secular life, often simultaneously, is a mark of his tremendous intellectual range. Taking the heterodox as his focus, Benson examines five figures and ideas on the margins of the post-Reformation English church: nonconforming puritans such as Malvolio as well as physical revenants—the walking dead—whom Shakespeare alludes to and features so tantalizingly in Hamlet. Benson applies what Keats called Shakespeare’s “negative capability”—his ability to treat both sides of an issue equally and without prejudice—to show that Shakespeare considers possible worlds where God is intimately involved in the lives of persons and, in the very same play, a world in which God may not even exist. Benson demonstrates both that the range of Shakespeare’s investigation of religious questions is more daring than has previously been thought, and that the distinction between the sacred and the profane, between the orthodox and the unorthodox, is one that Shakespeare continually engages.

The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare and Religion

James A. Parente, Jr., Religious Drama and the Christian Tradition: Christian Theater in Germany and the Netherlands 1500–1680 (Leiden: Brill, 1987), 26–8 and 77–8. Watt, Cheap Print, I 19 and 12.5–7; Walsham, Providence, 1–6.

The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare and Religion

A wide-ranging yet accessible investigation into the importance of religion in Shakespeare's works, from a team of eminent international scholars.

Mortal Thoughts

Mortal Thoughts is a study of the question of human identity in the early modern period.

Mortal Thoughts

Mortal Thoughts is a study of the question of human identity in the early modern period. It examines literature (Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton) alongside emerging forms of life writing (More, Foxe, and Montaigne) and also life drawing and self-portraits (Dürer, Hans Baldung Grien). It questions the religious and secular divide, and the way that historical narratives are poised around the concept of secularization. It does so by examining mortalityand the moment of death. A series of chapters examine religious, philosophical and literary concepts such as conscience, martyrdom, soliloquy, chance, suicide and embodiment. Mortal Thoughts is a study in literaryand artistic history which also challenges assumptions in the history of philosophy and religion.

Shakespeare and Early Modern Religion

Shakespeare and Early Modern Religion challenges and complicates one-sided attempts to attribute to Shakespeare himself firm or ... 7 On Catholicism as an ongoing topic of intense political discussion and anxiety throughout the span of ...

Shakespeare and Early Modern Religion

This volume freshly illuminates the diversity of early modern religious beliefs, practices and issues, and their representation in Shakespeare's plays.

Shakespeare and the Eighteenth Century

allusion and , 98 self - determination , 143 political rhetoric , 98-100 Selfishness , 18 of variorum annotation ... Romantic critics and Shakespeare , 7 , 92 , plays in his time , 1 , 45 95–8 , 115–16 , 148 religion and , 130 Romeo and ...

Shakespeare and the Eighteenth Century

This fascinating volume brings together Renaissance and eighteenth-century scholars who examine how Shakespeare gradually penetrated, and came to dominate, the culture and intellectual life of people in the English-speaking world. Approaching Shakespeare from a wide range of perspectives, including philosophy, science, textual practice, and theatre studies, the contributors paint a vivid picture of the relationship between eighteenth-century Shakespeare and ideas about shared nationhood, knowledge, morality, history, and the self.

Shakespeare Religion and Beyond

This religious conjunction hardly demotes itself in terms of yet another modern critical vantage point: that both ... in the Stationer's Register on January 7, 1601 (Brooke 140), thus allowing sufficient time for Shakespeare's having ...

Shakespeare  Religion and Beyond

A daring look into the art and technique of one of history’s most celebrated literary scholars, Shakespeare, Religion and Beyond is a detailed documentation on that attempt to shed light on a missing piece in a cryptic puzzle. As described by Robin L. Inboden, Ph.D. (Wittenberg University), “Fleissners’s book summarized, interrogates, and extends both long-held assumptions about Shakespeare’s work and newer claims alike. His speculative web of connections among plays, the life, the religion, and the literary inspirations of Shakespeare links the unexpected and thus suggests potentially fruitful avenues for further study.”

Shakespeare the Earl and the Jesuit

Vocabulary and Chronology : The Case of Shakespeare's Sonnets . " Review of English Studies 52 ( 2001 ) : 59-75 . Janelle , Pierre . Robert Southwell the Writer : A Study in Religious Inspiration . New York : Sheed & Ward , 1935 .

Shakespeare  the Earl  and the Jesuit

The Jesuit's influence is pervasive, but most especially when the poet/playwright takes up in his own work issues of special concern to the earl in a crucial decade (1593-1604), after Southwell's death, through the religious and political crises faced by the young nobleman during that time."--BOOK JACKET.

Religions in Shakespeare s Writings

The interest in Shakespeare and religion peaked in 2013–14 with the publication of no fewer than six books. ... 7), and he describes his procedure in four chapters after the introduction: “one on Shakespeare's own religion, ...

Religions in Shakespeare s Writings

Offering a wide range of scholarly perspectives, Religions in Shakespeare’s Writings explores Shakespeare’s depictions, throughout his canon, of various religions and matters related to them. This collection’s fifteen essays explore matters pertaining to Catholic, Anglican, and Puritan Christianity, the Albigensian heresy of the high middle ages, Islam, Judaism, Roman religion, different manifestations of religious paganism, and even the “religion of Shakespeare” practiced by Shakespeare’s nineteenth-century admirers. These essays analyze how Shakespeare depicts both tensions between religions and the syntheses of different religious expressions on topics as diverse as Shakespeare’s varied portrayals of the afterlife, religious experience in Measure for Measure, and Black natural law and The Tempest. This collection also explores the political ramifications of religion within Shakespeare’s works, as well as Shakespeare’s multifaceted uses of the Bible. Additionally, while this collection does not present a Shakespeare whose particular religious beliefs can definitely be known or are displayed uniformly throughout his canon, various essays consider to what extent Shakespeare’s individual works demonstrate a Christian foundation. Contributors include John D. Cox, Cyndia Susan Clegg, Grace Tiffany, Matthew J. Smith, Bethany C. Besteman, Sarah Skwire, Feisal Mohamed, Benedict J. Whalen, Benjamin Lockerd, Bryan Adams Hampton, Debra Johanyak, John E. Curran, Emily E. Stelzer, David V. Urban, and Julia Reinhard Lupton.

Masculinity and Marian Efficacy in Shakespeare s England

Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 - Criticism and interpretation. 2. Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint - In literature. 3. Masculinity in literature. 4. ... 7. Christianity and literature - England - History - 17th century. I. Title II.

Masculinity and Marian Efficacy in Shakespeare s England

Masculinity and Marian Efficacy in Shakespeare's England offers a new approach to evaluating the psychological 'loss' of the Virgin Mary in post-Reformation England by illustrating how, in the wake of Mary's demotion, re-inscriptions of her roles and meanings only proliferated, seizing hold of national imagination and resulting in new configurations of masculinity. The author surveys the early modern cultural and literary response to Mary's marginalization, and argues that Shakespeare employs both Roman Catholic and post-Reformation views of Marian strength not only to scrutinize cultural perceptions of masculinity, but also to offer his audience new avenues of exploring both religious and gendered subjectivity. By deploying Mary's symbolic valence to infuse certain characters, and dramatic situations with feminine potency, Espinosa analyzes how Shakespeare draws attention to the Virgin Mary as an alternative to an otherwise unilaterally masculine outlook on salvation and gendered identity formation.

Supernatural Environments in Shakespeare s England

religion: and science 184, 193, 220–3 see also belief; sociology of belief, theology religious turn, and spatial turn ... 206–8, 215 and perichoretic semiotics 195 and perspective 61, 163–4, 166–7, 221 Richardson, Brian 157 Richardson, ...

Supernatural Environments in Shakespeare s England

Bringing together recent scholarship on religion and the spatial imagination, Kristen Poole examines how changing religious beliefs and transforming conceptions of space were mutually informative in the decades around 1600. Supernatural Environments in Shakespeare's England explores a series of cultural spaces that focused attention on interactions between the human and the demonic or divine: the deathbed, purgatory, demonic contracts and their spatial surround, Reformation cosmologies and a landscape newly subject to cartographic surveying. It examines the seemingly incongruous coexistence of traditional religious beliefs and new mathematical, geometrical ways of perceiving the environment. Arguing that the late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century stage dramatized the phenomenological tension that resulted from this uneasy confluence, this groundbreaking study considers the complex nature of supernatural environments in Marlowe's Doctor Faustus and Shakespeare's Othello, Hamlet, Macbeth and The Tempest.

Secret Shakespeare

Shuger ( eds ) , Religion and Culture in Renaissance England ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 1997 ) , pp . 234-7 . See also Brian Crockett , The Play of Paradox : Stage and Sermon in Renaissance England ( Philadelphia ...

Secret Shakespeare

Includes essays on Venus and Adonis, A midsummer night's dream, Othello, Macbeth, The tempest, Cardenio, and King Lear.

The Oxford Handbook of Shakespeare and Embodiment

... of 267 and marriage 288–92 objects of critique 318 and Romeo and Juliet 296–7 and Shakespeare studies 15–20 and ... Shakespeare's plays 131–2, 141–2 Reclaim Shakespeare Company 705–7 regulation, of female sexuality 491–8 religion, ...

The Oxford Handbook of Shakespeare and Embodiment

The forty established and emerging scholars whose work is included in this volume bring an expansive understanding of feminism to questions of embodiment in Shakespeare and early modern studies. Using a diverse range of methods--historicism, psychoanalysis, queer theory, critical race studies, postcolonialism, posthumanism, eco-criticism, animal studies, disability studies, textual editing, performance and media studies--they present original readings of Shakespeare's plays and poems while situating his work both in the early modern period and the present day. Paying particular attention to the intersections of gender with race and sexuality, the volume collectively offers an exciting snapshot of the ways that 'feminism' and 'Shakespeare' continue to speak to and challenge each another.