Shorty Gotta Be Grown

Being raised in the game by conniving, money-hungry, married-to-the-streets parents, the only thing seventeen-year-old Porsha Jackson was sheltered from was fairytales.

Shorty Gotta Be Grown

Being raised in the game by conniving, money-hungry, married-to-the-streets parents, the only thing seventeen-year-old Porsha Jackson was sheltered from was fairytales. Calvin, her father, is one of the most feared and respected drug dealers in the city, and Trinity, her mother, has a reputation for a firm hand and on-point aim. From hustling and grinding to balancing a few hours of school a week to keep social services off the family’s back, Porsha has been groomed from an early age to hold her own and help run the family’s business. Now that she’s a few months away from turning eighteen, she’s anxious to be grown and have freedom from Cal and Trin’s control. All she wants is to have a lavish apartment and cuddle up with her secret boo, Elvin “Street” Thomas, who also happens to be one of her father’s most trusted street hustlers. By the time shorty finds out she’s too grown and in way over her head, the snake has already slithered his way into her heart, and the Jackson family will be hit with the worst luck ever.

Growing Up To Cowboy

One morning, around 4:30 A.M., he woke Shorty up, needing to go out side to the bathroom. Shorty got up and let him out and climbed back in his bedroll, not quite ready to get up. In just a few minutes Inky like to tore the door down ...

Growing Up To Cowboy

Bob Knox grew up in the cowboy life style of the 1930s and 40s, spending summers with two old-time cowboy uncles in various locations around Colorado. During this time, in the settings of no vehicles, staying in some pretty crude cow camps, he learned some of life's valuable lessons. His story gives good insights into what it was like being a cowboy before the advent of four-wheel drive pickups and horse trailers and later when it was important to adapt to modern day technology. Bob's book covers a wide spectrum of cowboy life--a span of sixty-four years--and his blend of humorous and historical accounts makes for fast, enjoyable reading. From one hilarious episode to another, the reader gets the feeling of what it was like, Growing up to Cowboy.

A Redneck Kid S Stories of Refusing to Grow Up

I have never seen such a sick dog, and he got no sympathy from anybody since we had to scrounge other bait. But Shorty had talent. Our lady friend suffered with a disabling sickness and, at times, could not go to the gate to collect the ...

A Redneck Kid   S Stories of Refusing to Grow Up

These roughly chronological stories starting with my earliest memories and continuing to the next eighty years are based on actual activities, including some encounters while coping with aggressive roosters and in-laws. My happy life has been enriched with lessons learned by watching birds, animals, and other humans, even snakes. Life in the piney woods of Alabama prepared me for many adventures encountered in New England, Old England, Korea, Upper Peninsula, south Louisiana, and the Midwest. Sadly, many of the people mentioned are now deceased. Some names have been changed to avoid embarrassment. These awesome people have shaped my happy lifestyle, even the policeman that dropped his pad and vamoosed as well as the Tacoma sex-soliciting pervert, not to mention a drafts lady toting a pail of water or the Bentley-craving client. In the book, you will find a list of reasons I refuse to grow up and a list of a several things eighty years of living have taught me. You might even learn about a titty bream.

Growing up Bronson

Everyone treated me like the wonder kid. “Shorty, if you will not tell, I can tell you what happened to Monte.” “I think he is dead, or the white horse would not have been running free. You don't think the wild pigs got him, do you?

Growing up Bronson

Finding himself the sole survivor of the Bronson family after the night of terror on Loco Ridge, Andy Bronson must face the demons that plague his life. Trying to prove his love for Rose Dander, he alienates himself from the very people who would claim him as their son. The modern West, complete with cattle rustlers, heroes, and murderers, fills this fast moving story with suspense, love, intrigue, and humor. A compelling must read sequel to TERROR ON LOCO RIDGE.

Blackeyed

chair under the “no hats” sign not botherin' nobody and Shorty said “Hey Trip, you damn-near-white mothafucka ... (Pause) He asked me to help him, told me he'd turn his life around, would take care of Shorty's son until he got grown.

Blackeyed

Blackeyed is a collection of plays and monologues. The topics covered in the book include housing and foreclosure, suicide, assault, mental health, the Black male experience, and more. The book intersects with critical race theory because the majority of this work positions race at the center of the experiences of the fictional or fictionalized characters. Embedded in these chapters are the interweaving of personal and ancestral stories, news reports, informal conversations, observations, interviews, and online research expressed in language unapologetically Black, critical, reflexive, and proud. Blackeyed can be used as a class text in theatre, education, creative writing, communication, women’s studies, sociology, and African American studies undergraduate and graduate courses. It can also be used by theatre practitioners, including actors and directors, working in community, regional and national theatre settings. Individuals including qualitative researchers interested in exploring more affective possibilities or arts-based researchers can also read this collection as an example of methodological exemplar. Finally, anyone interested in the Black experience as well as the specific topics covered in this book can read this collection of plays as one might read a collection of short stories.

The Riddle Exposed

Shorty queried. “It's the pot you've got growing around the house, along with all those youngies you've got visiting now. I don't mean Jan - she's cool, but all the other schoolgirls that were here yesterday; they were really gawking at ...

The Riddle Exposed

In 1973 the firebombing of the Whiskey Au-Go-Go nightclub grabbed the headlines in Brisbane unlike any other disaster beforehand. 15 people were killed amid the inferno, the worst mass-murder ever in Australia. Rumours were rife. Detectives were forewarned, but was the firebombing part of an implausible notion to embark on an extortion racket? Or was it a scheme for insurance purposes? Perhaps it was the act of a disgruntled customer, a former employee, or someone owed money? Politicians from all sides of Parliament demanded quick answers. Unbeknown to but a few, early in the morning after the fire, Billy McCulkin was the first person interviewed by detectives while his wife and young daughters fled from their Highgate Hill house; and they only returned to their house after the arrests of John Stuart and Jim Finch. Later, Mrs McCulkin confided to her co-worker, as well as a neighbour, and her brother that she feared for her safety because she knew her husband and his associates were involved in both the Torino and Whiskey Au-Go-Go nightclub fires. During the months of anxiety for Mrs McCulkin, the courtroom appearances of Stuart and Finch heard repeated outbursts from them asserting that detectives had concocted a false verbal confession. The subsequent wire-swallowing protests by Stuart and Finch were extraordinary. Finch even whacked off a piece of his finger, but the self-mutilating efforts from both achieved nothing. The trial, being the longest and costliest staged in Queensland, proceeded without Stuart, or any legal representative for him, while he lay handcuffed to a hospital bed - a first for any Australian court when a life imprisonment term is mandatory. Not long after the Whiskey murder trial, and the fifth reported wire-swallowing protest from Stuart, Mrs Barbara McCulkin and her two daughters disappeared, murdered by Vince O’Dempsey and Gary Dubois, though they were not then brought to stand trial because the case was far too riddled with the standard 1970s police corruption. Interwoven around the Waterside Workers Union journal, Port News, as its publisher William Stokes’ account of his acquaintanceship with everyone concerned - including the bizarre Clockwork Orange gang and a nympho wife who believed she was demoniacally possessed - leads to a harrowing tale. Expect the unexpected.

Brick City

This is a skill he would definitely need it he got the chance to work at Shorty's. “When I grow up, I ain't driving nothin' but Cadillacs, just like Shorty,” Loony said. “When you grow up, that's all your lanky ass will.

Brick City

In the late 1960s, the New Jersey projects stood like tattered, tired sentinels across the Newark skyline. Some saw them as eyesores; others called them home. Despite the comfort of familiarity, it certainly wasn’t easy being poor and black in the projects in 1962. It’s a good thing four young boys had each other. Diesel, Bugs, Loony, and Larry are barely teenagers when they meet and become inseparable, bonded by poverty and race. They come of age in an environment they don’t even realize is hostile. Summers are spent on adventures—sometimes legal, sometimes not, and many times not safe. These wild days and nights keep the boys together. But the projects aren’t all friends and fun. The boys deal with abuse, rough cops, and romantic connections that don’t end well. They grow into men in this place affectionately known as “brick city,” yet they don’t leave unscathed. For better or worse, the projects turn these boys into men, but not everyone gets out alive.

Pete

“We got thirty milk cows and a bull,” Shorty answered. “Wow! ... Andrew had instructed the boys to turn the cows out when they got back from church. ... “If you walked down the gutter and got some manure on your feet, they'd grow.

Pete

Pete, Forming the Foundation is a story about a farming family in Central Michigan during the Great Depression. When Marie, young and pregnant, learns she's been betrayed by her husband, she determines to raise the child without help from her estranged husband. The family comes alongside and provides the emotional and physical assistance she needs. Times are difficult for every American. Family, neighbors, and friends work together to get through dark days without government assistance. The family strives to form a foundation to stand Pete in good stead throughout his life. It touches on divorce, prejudice, anti-Semitism, a shell-shocked WWI veteran, and loss of the family homestead.

Growing Up in the Lone Star State

Everybody used to call me Shorty and Jelly, and they teased me all the time. But they didn't tease me about football. When I got to be a sophomore, I played defensive back and a little running back, but the guys ahead of me were bigger ...

Growing Up in the Lone Star State

A fascinating collection of oral history interviews details Texas in the early twentieth century and how life in the Lone Star State helped the interviewees achieve success.

Things I Only Did Once Growing Up Stories

I took the carburetors apart again and again until I finally got them to stop pouring gas out every time I opened the ... I had to get special oil from Shorty's gas station for the engines and that took two weeks because Shorty had to ...

Things I Only Did Once  Growing Up Stories


The Brooklyn Novels

A nice business for a grown - up man . " Shorty had been looking at the clock on the arch over the entrance to the parlor . At five his relief man came in ... Well , hell , look for yourself , you can see how I got her going already !

The Brooklyn Novels

Three classic novels in one volume: Summer in Williamsburg (1934), Homage to Blenholt (1936), and Low Company (1937). Fuchs wrote, "I devoted myself simply to the tenement: the life in the hallways, the commotion at the dumbwaiters, the assortment of characters in the building, their strivings and preoccupations, their troubles." These novels are as alive today as the day they were first printed, as exuberant. There are few novelists in America today who possess Fuchs's talent, his energy, his sense of life.

Shorty s Story

Shorty and Matt got the team harnessed and hitched to the wagon and loaded the tools. Matt had tossed a forkful of hay in the ... Shorty was looking for a thicket of closely growing trees. He wanted them small and straight for fence ...

Shorty s Story

This story takes place in south eastern Alberta about nineteen fifteen (1915), along the western edge of the Cypress hills. Shorty Stout, a drifting cowboy arrives at the A-X ranch, (the AXE), and is given a meal and a bunk. The ranch belongs to Xavier Forrest and his wife Angela, hence the name, A-X. Shorty isnt the kind to lie around so the next morning he is out working and fixing. The first thing he does is to fix the windmill which has been making a racket for weeks. Because he is such a handy person with tools and can do almost any work, he is given a job on the ranch. When spring comes he attends a dance in town with the other hands and on the way back to the ranch he meets up with a widow and her son, Dawn and Matt Ryan. He stops to help them cut some firewood and soon he is working for them every weekend. He fixes fences, builds a log bunkhouse, puts running water in the house and many other jobs that have been neglected because there was no one to do them. When the bunkhouse is completed, a dance is held to show how much everyones help has been appreciated. Meanwhile, out on the range, Shorty and his riding partner Gus, find a hidden valley in the hills, filled with Dawn Ryans cattle. The valley is believed to be the floor of an ancient lake which drained out through the dry gully that is the only entrance. The cattle are separated and some are sold, bringing them some sorely needed cash to help keep the ranch going. Shorty, Dawn and Matt do some exploring and discover a small inner valley that is a small corner of paradise. This small valley is so beautiful that anyone entering it find it hard to even speak until they are back in the main valley. Matt discovers there is fish in the lake in the large valley, and he uses some improvised gear to catch a trout and cook it in the fire after coating it with clay. He and the school teacher, Karen Carter, take a group of students on a survival trip to teach them how to survive if they got lost, and to live off the land. Dawn and Shorty eventually realize they were meant for each other; a fact known to Matt and Angela, Dawns older sister, for some time. Dawn asks Shorty to marry her and he agrees, but before getting married, they ride north to Medicine Hat to file for a homestead, taking in the Lost Valley. The day of the wedding arrives and afterwards, a huge reception and dance is held at the schoolhouse just outside town. About midnight, Matt and the school teacher help the newlyweds escape the party and go off by themselves. The weekend after the wedding, the three homesteaders head for Lost Valley, to get an idea of the land surrounding the valley. This valley has the richest soil and the best grass in Alberta and covers an estimated three hundred acres. Normally, a person is allowed to file on one hundred and sixty acres, but this area , being in the hills is described as waste land and they are allowed to file on a half section , or three hundred and twenty acres each. The government will pay to have the land surveyed, so a surveyor is found to do the job for them. When the land is surveyed and registered in their name, they need to find a way to make a wagon road to the valley, as the only way in is the dry watercourse that had drained the former lake in times long past. Many friends arrive to help with this task, which has to be done before building materials can be hauled into the valley. With much work over a long weekend, a road is made to the valley and the first wagon to ever enter the valley rolls over the newly constructed road. They are now ready to find a site to build a home on the Lost Valley Ranch. Shorty and Dawn spend a night in the Heavenly inner valley and in the morning she tells him he is to be a daddy and that nine months down the road a little girl named Allie will be born, because of one night spent in this enchanted valley.

Growing up Around Tombstone

Dad finally got the rigging off her, and she didn't waste any time leaving there. During the Helldorado Parade, ... A bull went behind the Tombstone Epitaph and Shorty Madrid, and some other people tried to run him out of there.

Growing up Around Tombstone

Growing up Around Tombstone is a family history of the Escapules. They are one of the oldest families still living in Tombstone, having emigrated from France during the early 1870s. The books tells how the Escapules mined and built ranches but mostly it tells of the familys life and struggles as recalled by one of the second generation Escapules born in Tombstone. There is a detailed account of family life, ranch work and horses, working and developing the mines, and making a living. The story takes the reader from the early days in Tombstone, through the war years, and up until the mid-1950s. The Escapules were a close, hard- working, and loving family. There is also a good depiction of life as it was lived by the townspeople. The book is rich in old family photographs and documents that help give a sense of the times and how people lived their day to day lives. There are also stories of many of the people living in Tombstone and the surrounding area. Ernest and Mildred Escapule and their family are the main characters. Tombstone, Arizona, became world famous for the rich silver and gold strike before the turn of the century, its lawless days, and the gun fight at the O K Corral.

Me n Shorty

The beard didn't grow there. He had the look of a picture ofa painting I'd seenin a magazine. 'The Gothic Wild Men'. Ohshoot! I've got to help Shorty. He's all the way in the water now and climbing out. “You ok?

Me  n  Shorty

Me ‘N’ Shorty Leave the present world behind as you step into an extraordinary tale of two seventeen year olds, in this sweeping novel set against a United States that had been plunged into despair by the Great Depression. The year was 1936, young Will Shaine’s world had revolved around his beloved parents and the magnificent thoroughbred horses that they’d raised and trained on the family’s horse farm. But now the death of his parents had left him alone in the world. He sat in the now quiet solitude of his home; the mantel clock seemed to be ticking away the seconds of his life, when he came to a life changing decision. He would sell the family property and go west to California. Out of respect for the hard work his family had invested in their horse farm, Will was determined not to squander, what would be his only inheritance. He placed the money in a money belt and would take it west. James Lotus Duke II, otherwise known as Shorty, left his family’s farm in Tennessee after a final physical confrontation with his alcoholic abusive father. His father told him to get off the property and never come back. Shorty hit the road with 17 years of emotional scars. Would his intelligence and wild sense of humor be enough to overcome his father’s voice that haunts his mind and tells him he’ll never be any good, and the ultimate dream crushing echo, “I wish you were never born.” Timely, as if an unseen force recognizes their needs, Will and Shorty are joined together for their passage across the continent. As they walk, hitch rides and hop trains, reality dictates that they grow up fast. They had no idea of what awaited them on the road. They find themselves exposed to the extremes of enormous wealth and to hobo camps and Hoovervilles, where people are struggling to get enough to eat. They cross paths with many colorful characters; some good, some bad, and some unhinged from reality. The worst of the worst lead them into dark life-threatening suspense, where seventeen year olds should not have to go. As they work their way across America they are also exposed to honest people with dreams of prosperity and goodness. It doesn’t take long before Will and Shorty meet and fall in love with two American girls. Their relationships are so intense that they believe they will last forever. But like so many in times past, they feel a responsibility to establish a secure situation for their loved ones. Soon they find themselves back on the road aching with sweet sorrow from being separated from their girls, but with a renewed sense of purpose. The love of a distressed and troubled racehorse will lead them in a direction they did not expect, as pure adventure and life threatening situations continue to challenge them. Is young love strong enough to pull them through?

Ain t No Makin It

You dug yourself a hole, you got a record, it's all built up. ... JM: But as a project kid, if you can imagine growing up in a completely different environment, even with your propensity for ... Shorty had the same—he was a Flanagan.

Ain t No Makin  It

This classic text addresses one of the most important issues in modern social theory and policy: how social inequality is reproduced from one generation to the next. With the original 1987 publication of Ain't No Makin' It, Jay MacLeod brought us to the Clarendon Heights housing project where we met the 'Brothers' and the 'Hallway Hangers'. Their story of poverty, race, and defeatism moved readers and challenged ethnic stereotypes. MacLeod's return eight years later, and the resulting 1995 revision, revealed little improvement in the lives of these men as they struggled in the labor market and crime-ridden underground economy. The third edition of this classic ethnography of social reproduction brings the story of inequality and social mobility into today's dialogue. Now fully updated with thirteen new interviews from the original Hallway Hangers and Brothers, as well as new theoretical analysis and comparison to the original conclusions, Ain't No Makin' It remains an admired and invaluable text.

Case Studies in Criminal Justice Ethics

Then Shorty got the message—straight from God, some said: Since an armed mugging was an aggravated assault, and a statutory addition to the state's ... With Shorty's anger growing by the hour, his family decided to hire a lawyer.

Case Studies in Criminal Justice Ethics

Building on the success of the popular first edition, the authors provide hypothetical criminal justice scenarios for analysis, having found in their experience as teachers that the process adds depth and dimension to the study of justice and ethics. This expanded second edition offers ten new cases addressing the intricate process of moral and ethical decision making. Focusing on both personal and social context, the authors explore true-to-life situations and encourage readers to think about the possible consequences that could result from the choices they make. The case studies provide realistic portrayals of current dilemmas in policing, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice. Political and noble cause corruption, perjury and judicial/prosecutorial misconduct, ethnic and gender prejudice, and many other social and criminal justice themes are featured. Following each scenario are thought-provoking questions to facilitate personal reflection and class discussion. Each section contains a bibliography of topical books and articles for readers interested in a more in-depth treatment of the issues.

Little Bobby Reese Growing Up in Exton PA

When we got our graduation pictures taken, I have to look back and laugh at myself. ... Ben pitched. Then there was Winnie Trego, Shorty Trego, Eddie Zonette, Carmen Zonette, dick Schwanenberg, Bill GrowinG Up in exTon, pa 25.

Little Bobby Reese Growing Up in Exton  PA

This is the author’s life story of growing up in Exton, Pa., from 1931-2010. He shares his memories of how Exton grew from a tiny village into a thriving town in the middle of Chester Co., Pa. He worked hard and long his whole life, beginning at his parents’ farm and restaurant/gas station. He has worked for Nat Gas delivering propane tanks; Murray’s Appliance in Paoli hauling appliances and installing a.c. units and antennas; Cabrini College as a baker; and at Beloit Eastern and Pepperidge Farm in Downingtown. He has hauled milk; sold ice, real hardwood charcoal, and firewood; set up for dog shows; and peddled produce and flowers for roadside stands and stores, such as Genuardi’s. At one time he owned Twin City Beverage in Spring City and had his own bakery where he sold his famous sticky buns. One of his most important commitments was helping to start the West Whiteland Fire Company and being a volunteer fireman. He includes the stories of many of the fires as well as the times they assisted Downingtown, Lionville, and East Whiteland Fire Companies, among others. (184pp. illus. Masthof Press, 2015.)

If I Grow Up

“That's why he threw that shorty out the window?” “Not just any shorty,” Rance said. “Marcus's nephew. See? He'll do anything I say. And that's all he gotta do. Now that Marcus is gone, there's just gonna be one gang around here. Mine.

If I Grow Up

In a gripping novel with a plot pulled from the headlines, Todd Strasser turns his attention to gang life in the inner-city projects. DeShawn is a teenager growing up in the projects. Most of his friends only see one choice: join up to a gang. DeShawn is smart enough to want to stay in school and make something more of himself, but when his family is starving while his friends have fancy bling and new sneakers, DeShawn is forced to decide--is his integrity more important than feeding his family?

Capitol of Maryland

That mistake that got you sent to boys village was a good mistake because you learned from it. As long as you learn from it, ... Shorty, if you want to grow in this game you got to disassociate yourself with dumb niggas doing dumb shit.

Capitol of Maryland

Millions of poor children are failed by their families, the juvenile justice system, and by child welfare _reversed) farewell child. Prison is the only university guaranteed program for children in America. Our country has 2.3 million prisoners, which is the worlds largest inmate population. We have more prisoners than China, a nation that has four times as many people as the United States. Those who are incarcerated are disproportionately people of color who are products of a society that has neglected and marginalized them. More than 2,300 Maryland inmates were serving a life sentence in 2008. Nearly 77% of those inmates are African Americans, making Maryland the state with the largest share of black prisoners serving life sentences. Among the 269 prisoners in Maryland sentenced to life for crimes committed when they were juveniles, 226 are black. The only thing Mary about this land was bloody Mary, but dont get it confused with the alcoholic beverage, Maryland-Murdaland. This is my story, welcome to THE CAPITAL OF MARYLAND.

A Stone of Hope

Shorty got a fat ass, bro. ... Shorty, can Italk to you for a second? ... When we got bored or restless, we'd drive around the block blasting Nas or Jay-Z, our heroes who grew up poor and troubled a couple of miles away.

A Stone of Hope

In the tradition of The Other Wes Moore and Just Mercy, a searing memoir and clarion call to save our at-risk youth by a young black man who himself was a lost cause—until he landed in a rehabilitation program that saved his life and gave him purpose. Born into abject poverty in Haiti, young Jim St. Germain moved to Brooklyn’s Crown Heights, into an overcrowded apartment with his family. He quickly adapted to street life and began stealing, dealing drugs, and growing increasingly indifferent to despair and violence. By the time he was arrested for dealing crack cocaine, he had been handcuffed more than a dozen times. At the age of fifteen the walls of the system were closing around him. But instead of prison, St. Germain was placed in "Boys Town," a nonsecure detention facility designed for rehabilitation. Surrounded by mentors and positive male authority who enforced a system based on structure and privileges rather than intimidation and punishment, St. Germain slowly found his way, eventually getting his GED and graduating from college. Then he made the bravest decision of his life: to live, as an adult, in the projects where he had lost himself, and to work to reform the way the criminal justice system treats at-risk youth. A Stone of Hope is more than an incredible coming-of-age story; told with a degree of candor that requires the deepest courage, it is also a rallying cry. No one is who they are going to be—or capable of being—at sixteen. St. Germain is living proof of this. He contends that we must work to build a world in which we do not give up on a swath of the next generation. Passionate, eloquent, and timely, illustrated with photographs throughout, A Stone of Hope is an inspiring challenge for every American, and is certain to spark debate nationwide.