Should We Eat Meat?

Evolution and Consequences of Modern Carnivory

Should We Eat Meat?

Meat eating is often a contentious subject, whether considering the technical, ethical, environmental, political, or health-related aspects of production and consumption. This book is a wide-ranging and interdisciplinary examination and critique of meat consumption by humans, throughout their evolution and around the world. Setting the scene with a chapter on meat’s role in human evolution and its growing influence during the development of agricultural practices, the book goes on to examine modern production systems, their efficiencies, outputs, and impacts. The major global trends of meat consumption are described in order to find out what part its consumption plays in changing modern diets in countries around the world. The heart of the book addresses the consequences of the "massive carnivory" of western diets, looking at the inefficiencies of production and at the huge impacts on land, water, and the atmosphere. Health impacts are also covered, both positive and negative. In conclusion, the author looks forward at his vision of “rational meat eating”, where environmental and health impacts are reduced, animals are treated more humanely, and alternative sources of protein make a higher contribution. Should We Eat Meat? is not an ideological tract for or against carnivorousness but rather a careful evaluation of meat's roles in human diets and the environmental and health consequences of its production and consumption. It will be of interest to a wide readership including professionals and academics in food and agricultural production, human health and nutrition, environmental science, and regulatory and policy making bodies around the world.

Should We Eat Meat?

Evolution and Consequences of Modern Carnivory

Should We Eat Meat?

Meat eating is often a contentious subject, whether considering the technical, ethical, environmental, political, or health-related aspects of production and consumption. This book is a wide-ranging and interdisciplinary examination and critique of meat consumption by humans, throughout their evolution and around the world. Setting the scene with a chapter on meat’s role in human evolution and its growing influence during the development of agricultural practices, the book goes on to examine modern production systems, their efficiencies, outputs, and impacts. The major global trends of meat consumption are described in order to find out what part its consumption plays in changing modern diets in countries around the world. The heart of the book addresses the consequences of the "massive carnivory" of western diets, looking at the inefficiencies of production and at the huge impacts on land, water, and the atmosphere. Health impacts are also covered, both positive and negative. In conclusion, the author looks forward at his vision of “rational meat eating”, where environmental and health impacts are reduced, animals are treated more humanely, and alternative sources of protein make a higher contribution. Should We Eat Meat? is not an ideological tract for or against carnivorousness but rather a careful evaluation of meat's roles in human diets and the environmental and health consequences of its production and consumption. It will be of interest to a wide readership including professionals and academics in food and agricultural production, human health and nutrition, environmental science, and regulatory and policy making bodies around the world.

Duty and the Beast

Should We Eat Meat in the Name of Animal Rights?

Duty and the Beast

Analyzes current philosophical and scientific debates about animal rights and the ethics of eating meat.

What Should We Eat?

What Should We Eat?

Gluten, red meat, fish, insects, all things we do or don't eat, but could. Should we? This book explores how best to sustain ourselves, from organic food to fast food. Readers are treated to both sides of current dietary views on how humans should be eating for health and longevity.

Eating Animals

Eating Animals

Eating Animals is Jonathan Safran Foer's eye-opening account of where meat comes from 'I simply wanted to know - for myself and my family - what meat is. Where does it come from? How is it produced? What are the economic, social and environmental effects? Are there animals that it is straightforwardly right to eat? Are there situations in which not eating animals is wrong? If this began as a personal quest, it didn't stay that way for long . . . ' Jonathan Safran Foer's Eating Animals is the most original book on the subject of food written this century. It will change the way you think, and change the way you eat. For good. 'Moving, disturbing, should be compulsory reading. A genuine masterwork. Read this book. It will change you' Time Out 'Shocking, incandescent, brilliant' The Times 'Everyone who eats flesh should read this book' Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall 'Gripping, horrible, wonderful, breathtaking, original. A brilliant synthesis of argument, science and storytelling. One of the finest books ever written on the subject of eating animals' The Times Literary Supplement 'Horrifying, eloquent, timely' Spectator 'If you eat meat and fish, you should read this book. Even if you don't, you should. It might bring the beginning of a change of heart about all living things' Joanna Lumley Jonathan Safran Foer was born in 1977. He is the author of Everything is Illuminated, which won the National Jewish Book Award and the Guardian First Book award; Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, which is now a major film starring Tom Hanks and Sandra Bullock; and Eating Animals. He is also the editor of A Convergence of Birds and of a new edition of the Haggadah.

Impact of Meat Consumption on Health and Environmental Sustainability

Impact of Meat Consumption on Health and Environmental Sustainability

Meat consumption impacts all aspects of human life and humanity?s long-term survival prospects. Despite this knowledge, society continues to ignore the negative impact of consuming meat, which include excessively high contributions to global greenhouse gas emissions, land and water pollution and depletion, antimicrobial resistance, and negative impacts on human health. Impact of Meat Consumption on Health and Environmental Sustainability addresses the difficulties, challenges, and opportunities in reducing excessive meat consumption in order to mitigate human and environmental damage. Policymakers, academicians, researchers, advanced-level students, technology developers, and government officials will find this text useful in furthering their research exposure to pertinent topics such as dietary recommendations for limiting meat consumption, trade and the meat industry, ethics of meat production and consumption, and the environmental impacts of meat consumption.

Meat Logic

Why Do We Eat Animals?

Meat Logic

Why do we eat animals? Most of us think this question is absurd, but if pressed to answer we tend to provide one of a number of rationalizations. For example: "Humans are omnivores." “Every living thing eats other living things.” "Animals don't possess human cognition." “Humans need to eat animals to live.” We've all heard these arguments before, and many others too. Maybe we've even used these arguments ourselves. But are they logically sound? Or is eating animals in fact a prejudice, involving a thought process similar to the thought process behind racism and sexism? How exactly could the subject of eating animals teach us anything about prejudice and human rights? And supposing humans actually did need to eat animals to stay healthy, what can logic tell us about how we should act in such a situation? In this book we examine 31 categories of rationalizations for eating animals and put them all to the test. Do our thoughts and actions stand up to rational scrutiny or not? And if our thought process is ever failing us, can this be illuminated? Along with presenting a review of some of the important philosophical literature on the subject, Meat Logic examines the logic of eating animals to answer the age-old question once and for all. You may never think of food the same way again.

The Moral Complexities of Eating Meat

The Moral Complexities of Eating Meat

A new collection offering provocative and often counterintuitive conclusions on the ethics of meat eating In a world of industralized farming and feed lots, is eating meat ever a morally responsible choice? Is eating organic or free range sufficient to change the moral equation? Is there a moral cost in not eating meat? As billions of animals continue to be raised and killed by human beings for human consumption, affecting the significance and urgency in answering these questions grow. This volume collects twelve new essays by leading moral philosophers who address the difficult questions surrounding meat eating by examining various implications and consequences of our food choices. Some argue for the moral permissibility of eating meat by suggesting views such as farm animals would not exist and flourish otherwise, and the painless death that awaits is no loss to them. Others consider more specific examples like whether buying french fries at McDonalds is just as problematic as ordering a Big Mac due to the action's indirect support of a major purveyor of meat. The Moral Complexities of Eating Meat is a stimulating contribution to the ongoing debate on meat consumption and actively challenges readers to reevlaute their stand on food and animal ethics.

Three Veg and Meat

More veg, less meat; flip the balance on your plate

Three Veg and Meat

The new flexitarianism - make veg the hero You know you should be eating more healthy vegies - but sometimes you prefer burgers, nachos and chicken schnitzel to salad. So how do you get the dietary balance right without sacrificing flavour? Olivia Andrews has taken all your favourite dishes and magically flipped the balance to more veg and less meat. Try her Butternut chicken, Quick 'roast' pork dinner, Amen for my ramen, New sausage rolls and Better chocolate brownies and you won't ever want to flip back. Your favourite meals, made healthy Includes a 4-week meal plan Feed the fussiest of families Keep your vegetarians and meat-eaters happy