Sinography The Borrowing and Adaptation of the Chinese Script

In Sinography, Zev Handel provides a comprehensive comparative analysis of the ways in which the Chinese-character script evolved as it was adapted to write other languages of Asia, including Korean, Vietnamese, Japanese, Zhuang, Khitan, ...

Sinography  The Borrowing and Adaptation of the Chinese Script

In Sinography, Zev Handel provides a comprehensive comparative analysis of the ways in which the Chinese-character script evolved as it was adapted to write other languages of Asia, including Korean, Vietnamese, Japanese, Zhuang, Khitan, and Jurchen.

Geschichte der Germanistik

Ming Dong Gu (Hg.), Routledge Handbook of Modern Chinese Literature, London: Routledge 2018. Zev Handel, Sinography: The Borrowing and Adaptation of the Chinese Script, Leiden: Brill 2019. Alexander Jones, Liba Taub (Hg.), The Cambridge ...

Geschichte der Germanistik

Heinz Schlaffer: Georg Büchmanns "Geflügelte Worte" Konstantin Azadovski und Gabriel Superfin: Die Odyssee des "Professors" Matankin Denis Thouard: Blumenberg et l`hérmé-neutique de la lecture Christoph König: Nietzsches zweite Autorschaft Michel Espagne: Un projet de dictionnaire sino-européen des concepts critiques Na Schädlich: Über das "bildliche Denken" als hermeneutisches Mittel in der Geschichte der chinesischen Philologie Kommentierte Bibliographie 2018/19 und Projektberichte.

Kingdom of Characters

... Victoria: Penguin, 2016); Peter Kornicki, Languages, Texts, and Chinese Scripts in East Asia (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018); Zev Handel, Sinography: The Borrowing and Adaptation of the Chinese Script (Leiden, Boston: Brill, ...

Kingdom of Characters

A riveting, masterfully researched account of the bold innovators who adapted the Chinese language to the modern world, transforming China into a superpower in the process What does it take to reinvent the world's oldest living language? China today is one of the world's most powerful nations, yet just a century ago it was a crumbling empire with literacy reserved for the elite few, left behind in the wake of Western technology. In Kingdom of Characters, Jing Tsu shows that China's most daunting challenge was a linguistic one: to make the formidable Chinese language - a 2,200-year-old writing system that was daunting to natives and foreigners alike - accessible to a globalized, digital world. Kingdom of Characters follows the bold innovators who adapted the Chinese script - and the value-system it represents - to the technological advances that would shape the twentieth century and beyond, from the telegram to the typewriter to the smartphone. From the exiled reformer who risked death to advocate for Mandarin as a national language to the imprisoned computer engineer who devised input codes for Chinese characters on the lid of a teacup, generations of scholars, missionaries, librarians, politicians, inventors, nationalists and revolutionaries alike understood the urgency of their task and its world-shaping consequences. With larger-than-life characters and a thrilling narrative, Kingdom of Characters offers an astonishingly original perspective on one of the twentieth century's most dramatic transformations.

Chinese Linguistics

The Handbook of Chinese Linguistics. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 576–98. Handel, Zev (2019). Sinography: The Borrowing and Adaptation of the Chinese Script. Leiden: Brill. Hannas, William C. (1997). Asia's Orthographic Dilemma.

Chinese Linguistics

This volume provides a broad introduction to Chinese linguistics. It offers an accessible synthesis of the most relevant topics in the field both for researchers and scholars on China studies and for linguists, including those with little or no previous knowledge of Chinese.

Schrift und Schriftlichkeit

The series Handbooks of Linguistics and Communication Science is designed to illuminate a field which not only includes general linguistics and the study of linguistics as applied to specific languages, but also covers those more recent ...

Schrift und Schriftlichkeit


The Cambridge Companion to World Literature

See Z. Handel, Sinography: The borrowing and adaptation of the Chinese script (Leiden: Brill, 2018). J. Derrida, Of Grammatology, G. C. Spivak (trans.), (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1976), p. 303.

The Cambridge Companion to World Literature

This Companion presents lucid and exemplary critical essays, introducing readers to the major ideas and practices of world literary studies.

Discourses Agency and Identity in Malaysia

Sinography: The borrowing and adaptation of the Chinese script. Leiden: Brill. Harlow, Barbara, and Mia Carter, eds. 2003.Archives of empire. Vol. 1:From the East India Company to the Suez Canal. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Discourses  Agency and Identity in Malaysia

This book seeks to break new ground, both empirically and conceptually, in examining discourses of identity formation and the agency of critical social practices in Malaysia. Taking an inclusive cultural studies perspective, it questions the ideological narrative of ‘race’ and ‘ethnicity’ that dominates explanations of conflicts and cleavages in the Malaysian context. The contributions are organised in three broad themes. ‘Identities in Contestation: Borders, Complexities and Hybridities’ takes a range of empirical studies—literary translation, religion, gender, ethnicity, indigeneity and sexual orientation—to break down preconceived notions of fixed identities. This then opens up an examination of ‘Identities and Movements: Agency and Alternative Discourses’, in which contributors deal with counter-hegemonic social movements—of anti-racism, young people, environmentalism and independent publishing—that explicitly seek to open up greater critical, democratic space within the Malaysian polity. The third section, ‘Identities and Narratives: Culture and the Media’, then provides a close textual reading of some exemplars of new cultural and media practices found in oral testimonies, popular music, film, radio programming and storytelling who have consciously created bodies of work that question the dominant national narrative. This book is a valuable interdisciplinary work for advanced students and researchers interested in representations of identity and nationhood in Malaysia, and for those with wider interests in the fields of critical cultural studies and discourse analysis. “Here is a fresh, startling book to aid the task of unbinding the straitjackets of ‘Malay’, ‘Chinese’ and ‘Indian’, with which colonialism bound Malaysia’s plural inheritance, and on which the postcolonial state continues to rely. In it, a panoply of unlikely identities—Bajau liminality, Kelabit philosophy, Islamic feminism, refugee hybridity and more—finds expression and offers hope for liberation”. Rachel Leow, University of Cambridge “This book shakes the foundations of race thinking in Malaysian studies by expanding the range of cases, perspectives and outcomes of identity. It offers students of Malaysia an examination of identity and agency that is expansive, critical and engaging, and its interdisciplinary depth brings Malaysian studies into conversation with scholarship across the world”. Sumit Mandal, University of Nottingham Malaysia “This is a much-needed work that helps us to take apart the colonial inherited categories of race which informed the notion of the plural society, the idea of plurality without multiculturalism. It complicates the picture of identity by bringing in religion, gender, indigeneity and sexual orientation, and helps us to imagine what a truly multiculturalist Malaysia might look like”. Syed Farid Alatas, National University of Singapore

The Grammar of Chinese Characters

Handel, Z., 2019, Sinography: A cross-linguistic study of the borrowing and adaptation of the Chinese script, Brill, Leiden. Handel, Z., Forthcoming, “The cognitive role of semantic classifiers in modern Chinese writing as reflected in ...

The Grammar of Chinese Characters

Anybody who reads or writes Chinese characters knows that they obey a grammar of sorts: though numerous, they are built out of a much smaller set of constituents, often interpretable in meaning or pronunciation, that are themselves built out of an even smaller set of strokes. This book goes far beyond these basic facts to show that Chinese characters truly have a productive and psychologically real lexical grammar of the same sort seen in spoken and signed languages, with non-trivial analogs of morphology (the combination of potentially interpretable constituents), phonology (formal regularities without implications for interpretation), and phonetics (articulatory and perceptual constraints). Evidence comes from a wide variety of sources, from quantitative corpus analyses to experiments on character reading, writing, and learning. The grammatical approach helps capture how character constituents combine as they do, how strokes systematically vary in different environments, how character form evolved from ancient times to the modern simplified system, and how readers and writers are able to process or learn even entirely novel characters. This book not only provides tools for exploring the full richness of Chinese orthography, but also offers new ways of thinking about the most fundamental question in linguistic theory: what is grammar?

Prehistoric Steppe Adaptation and the Horse

The other sinograph often used to describe horseriding is ( kuà , ' sit astride ' ) , but it is to be found neither ... Judging from the evolution of the graphs for horseriding in the Chinese script , there is no solid evidence that the ...

Prehistoric Steppe Adaptation and the Horse

The domestication of the horse was one of the most significant events in the development of many human societies, ushering in new modes of transport and warfare and generating social and political change. This volume examines the origins of horse husbandry and pastoralism - especially nomadic pastoralism - in the Eurasian steppe. It brings together archaeologists and archaeozoologists from Asia, Europe and North America ito provide a wide-ranging overview of issues and evidence for the development of Central European societies from the Neolithic to the Iron Age. Much of the material is here made available in English for the first time. The issues surrounding the domestication of the horse are set firmly within the broader context of steppe ecology and human subsistence, and with the development of pastoral economies across this crucial geographical zone.