Six Impossible Things

Six Impossible Things

In this charming story of one guy's efforts to get it together when his life is falling apart, award-winning author Fiona Wood introduces an irresistible voice and a delightfully awkward character who is impossible to forget. 1. Kiss Estelle. 2. Get a job. 3. Cheer my mother up. 4. Try not to be a complete nerd/loser. 5. Talk to my father when he calls. 6. Figure out how to be good. Nerd-boy Dan Cereill is not quite coping with a whole heap of problems, including a reversal of family fortune, moving, new-school hell, a mother with a failing wedding cake business, a just-out gay dad, and a massive crush on Estelle, the girl next door. His life is a mess, but for now he's narrowed it down to just six impossible things....

Six Impossible Things

The ‘Quanta of Solace’ and the Mysteries of the Subatomic World

Six Impossible Things

'An accessible primer on all things quantum' - Sunday Times Quantum physics is strange. It tells us that a particle can be in two places at once. Indeed, that particle is also a wave, and everything in the quantum world can be described entirely in terms of waves, or entirely in terms of particles, whichever you prefer. All of this was clear by the end of the 1920s. But to the great distress of many physicists, let alone ordinary mortals, nobody has ever been able to come up with a common sense explanation of what is going on. Physicists have sought ‘quanta of solace’ in a variety of more or less convincing interpretations. Popular science master John Gribbin takes us on a delightfully mind-bending tour through the ‘big six’, from the Copenhagen interpretation via the pilot wave and many worlds approaches. All of them are crazy, and some are more crazy than others, but in this world crazy does not necessarily mean wrong, and being more crazy does not necessarily mean more wrong.

Six Impossible Things Before Breakfast

The Evolutionary Origins of Belief

Six Impossible Things Before Breakfast

Why does every society around the world have a religious tradition of some sort? Professor Lewis Wolpert investigates the nature of belief and its causes. He looks at belief's psychological basis and its possible evolutionary origins in physical cause and effect. Wolpert explores the different types of belief - including that of animals, of children, of the religious, and of those suffering from psychiatric disorders. And he asks whether it is possible to live without belief at all, or whether it is a necessary component of a functioning society.

Six Impossible Things

Six Impossible Things

The Village of Greenhurst, headquarters for the Wayne family, is aflutter with excitement and festivity in anticipation of Miriam Arkwright's coming marriage to Italian count. All the Waynes descend on brother Nicholas, including red-headed Julia who had been sent to Italy to become a concert pianist, and returns home not quite sure what she wants to be. She is no longer the child Nicholas remembers, but is still enough of a scatter-brain to mix up her luggage . . . thereby involving Nicholas in the most wonderful love of his life. The luggage in question ends up in the hands of Elaine Morley, the most beautiful young woman Nicholas has seen in many a year. Elaine, however, to her increasing dismay, is already engaged--to a most determined and quite nasty fellow who refuses to let her go. . . Julia, so intent on solving the romantic problems of others, suddenly realizes she has not one--but two of her own. One is a new arrival in town; the other, Derek Arkwright, who has always seemed just the boy next door . . . And even Nicholas' rather formidable secretary, Miss Stoker, is caught up in the shower of orange blossoms. Although that well-known course is certainly fraught with obstacles for everybody, including Miriam and her Count, Mrs. Cadell can handle it all, and does, in her usual engaging, spontaneous, and eminently sensible way.

Six Impossible Things

Rhymes With Love

Six Impossible Things

In the sixth novel of the enchanting Rhymes With Love series from New York Times bestselling author Elizabeth Boyle, a nobleman falls in love with a beautiful spy he must protect… Lord Rimswell is a man of honor and absolutes. If he says something is impossible, it is. Yet his life of right and wrong is turned upside down when he finds himself in a compromising situation with the most unyielding, yet maddeningly beautiful, woman in London. If only he had not given in to the irresistible temptation to kiss her. Now he must marry her. Miss Roselie Stratton is the very definition of impossible—headstrong, outspoken, and carrying a reticule of secrets that could ruin more than her reputation. Kissing Brody is hardly the most ruinous thing Roselie has ever done as a secret agent for the Home Office…nor will she let a marriage of convenience stop her from continuing her work. Little does Roselie realize that she has underestimated Brody's resolve to keep her safe—for he has hopelessly fallen in love with her and is determined to do the impossible by stealing her heart in return. An Avon Romance

Alice Beyond Wonderland

Essays for the Twenty-first Century

Alice Beyond Wonderland

Alice beyond Wonderland explores the ubiquitous power of Lewis Carroll’s imagined world. Including work by some of the most prominent contemporary scholars in the field of Lewis Carroll studies, all introduced by Karoline Leach’s edgy foreword, Alice beyond Wonderland considers the literary, imaginative, and cultural influences of Carroll’s 19th-century story on the high-tech, postindustrial cultural space of the twenty-first century. The scholars in this volume attempt to move beyond the sexually charged permutations of the "Carroll myth," the image of an introverted man fumbling into literary immortality through his love for a prepubescent Alice. Contributions include an essay comparing Dantean and Carrollian underworlds, one investigating child characters as double agents in untamed lands, one placing Wonderland within the geometrical and algebraic “fourth dimension,” one investigating the visual and verbal interplay of hand imagery, and one exploring the influence of Japanese translations of Alice on the Gothic-Lolita subculture of neo-Victorian enthusiasts. This is a bold, capacious, and challenging work.