African Voices of the Atlantic Slave Trade

Beyond the Silence and the Shame

African Voices of the Atlantic Slave Trade

A different perspective on the slave trade focuses on the few stories that have been remembered in the Anlo Ewe community, residents of an area in southeastern Ghana once called the old Slave Coast.

African Voices in the African American Heritage

African Voices in the African American Heritage

African slaves brought to North America were stripped of their possessions. Slave owners tried to strip them of their culture too. The dominance of European American culture suppressed the traits of African traditions until the majority of scholars thought, even into the 1970s, that virtually all significant traces had been erased. But those scholars were wrong. Although the slaves' hands were empty, their heads and hearts remained full. Africans kept their values in religious and family structures, and kept their ideas about how to organize their communities. Despite the traumas of slavery, Reconstruction, segregation, and continuing racism, these ways of life survived. Drawing on oral history, interviews, folklore, song lyrics, and the works of two major African American folk artists—Sam Doyle and Bill Traylor—as well as printed historical documentation, African Voices in the African American Heritage reveals African influences on African American life and shows how the African impulse fed American culture even into the 20th century.

Piratica III: The Family Sea

Piratica III: The Family Sea

Art Blastside in her third daring adventure upon the high seas. It's been eighteen months since Art's baby was born: a pretty child called Africa, with Felix's dark hair and Art's grey eyes. Now Art, who dreamed of being like her own loving, wonderful Ma, must face up to the fact that she has absolutely no warm feeling for her child. In fact - Art can't stand her! What's wrong with her? Beyond the family lies an unsettled world too. The French are still waging war, and England has fallen out of love with pirates. Piratomania has been suppressed by the government and Art and Felix are evicted from their cliff-top mansion. The return of Ebad and the new and improved Unwelcome Stranger prompts Art to regroup her ragtag crew and sail once again across the oceans, through wild weather, bizarre places and riotous sea battles, to return to the Treasured Isle and learn the ultimate true secret behind the treasure and the mystery of why Art can't love her child.

The Waterman's Song

Slavery and Freedom in Maritime North Carolina

The Waterman's Song

The first major study of slavery in the maritime South, The Waterman's Song chronicles the world of slave and free black fishermen, pilots, rivermen, sailors, ferrymen, and other laborers who, from the colonial era through Reconstruction, plied the vast inland waters of North Carolina from the Outer Banks to the upper reaches of tidewater rivers. Demonstrating the vitality and significance of this local African American maritime culture, David Cecelski also reveals its connections to the Afro-Caribbean, the relatively egalitarian work culture of seafaring men who visited nearby ports, and the revolutionary political tides that coursed throughout the black Atlantic. Black maritime laborers played an essential role in local abolitionist activity, slave insurrections, and other antislavery activism. They also boatlifted thousands of slaves to freedom during the Civil War. But most important, Cecelski says, they carried an insurgent, democratic vision born in the maritime districts of the slave South into the political maelstrom of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

The Anti-slavery Reporter and Aborigines' Friend

The Anti-slavery Reporter and Aborigines' Friend

Vols. 3-8, 3d ser., include the 16th-21st annual reports of the British and foreign anti-slavery society. The 22d-24th annual reports are appended to v. 9-11, 3d ser. Series 4 contains annual reports of the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society. Series 5 contains annual reports of the Anti-Slavery and Aborigines Protection Society.

The Works of John Greenleaf Whittier: Narrative and legendary poems.- v.2. Poems of nature, religious poems, etc.- v.3. Anti-slavery poems; Songs of labor and reform.- v.4. Personal poems; The tent on the beach, etc; Poems by Elizabeth H. Whittier.- v.5. Margaret Smith's journal; tales and sketches.- v.6. Old portraits and modern sketches; Historical papers, etc.- v.7. The conflict with slavery; reform and politics; the inner life, etc

The Works of John Greenleaf Whittier: Narrative and legendary poems.- v.2. Poems of nature, religious poems, etc.- v.3. Anti-slavery poems; Songs of labor and reform.- v.4. Personal poems; The tent on the beach, etc; Poems by Elizabeth H. Whittier.- v.5. Margaret Smith's journal; tales and sketches.- v.6. Old portraits and modern sketches; Historical papers, etc.- v.7. The conflict with slavery; reform and politics; the inner life, etc