Small Gods

Discworld Novel, A

Small Gods

Lost in the chill deeps of space between the galaxies, it sails on forever, a flat, circular world carried on the back of a giant turtle— Discworld —a land where the unexpected can be expected. Where the strangest things happen to the nicest people. Like Brutha, a simple lad who only wants to tend his melon patch. Until one day he hears the voice of a god calling his name. A small god, to be sure. But bossy as Hell.

Small Gods

(Discworld Novel 13)

Small Gods

'Just because you can't explain it, doesn't mean it's a miracle.' In the beginning was the Word. And the Word was: 'Hey, you!' This is the Discworld, after all, and religion is a controversial business. Everyone has their own opinion, and indeed their own gods, of every shape and size, and all elbowing for space at the top. In such a competitive environment, shape and size can be pretty crucial to make one's presence felt. So it's certainly not helpful to be reduced to appearing in the form of a tortoise, a manifestation far below god-like status in anyone's book. In such instances, you need an acolyte, and fast: for the Great God Om, Brutha the novice is the Chosen One – or at least the only One available. He wants peace and justice and brotherly love. He also wants the Inquisition to stop torturing him now, please...

Terry Pratchett's Narrative Worlds

From Giant Turtles to Small Gods

Terry Pratchett's Narrative Worlds

This book highlights the multi-dimensionality of the work of British fantasy writer and Discworld creator Terry Pratchett. Taking into account content, political commentary, and literary technique, it explores the impact of Pratchett's work on fantasy writing and genre conventions.With chapters on gender, multiculturalism, secularism, education, and relativism, Section One focuses on different characters’ situatedness within Pratchett’s novels and what this may tell us about the direction of his social, religious and political criticism. Section Two discusses the aesthetic form that this criticism takes, and analyses the post- and meta-modern aspects of Pratchett’s writing, his use of humour, and genre adaptations and deconstructions. This is the ideal collection for any literary and cultural studies scholar, researcher or student interested in fantasy and popular culture in general, and in Terry Pratchett in particular.

Introduction to Pagan Studies

Introduction to Pagan Studies

A text on the academic study of contemporary wicca and paganism throughout the world.

The Gods Trilogy

The Gods Trilogy

The Discworld is, as everyone knows, and no one should now need to be told, flat. It rides through space on the back of four elephants* which, in turn, are standing on the shell of an enormous turtle. But just because it is being borne through space on the back of a turtle, doesn't mean it doesn't need gods . . . The Gods Trilogy is a bumper volume containing the complete text of three of Terry Pratchett's celebrated novels: SMALL GODS Brutha is the Chosen One. His god has spoken to him, admittedly while currently in the shape of a tortoise; and Brutha now has a mission.PYRAMIDS It isn't easy, being a teenage pharaoh: you're not allowed to carry money; uninhibited young women peel grapes for you and the Great Pyramid has just exploded because of paracosmic instability . . . HOGFATHER It's the night before Hogswatch . . . and it's too quiet. There's snow, there're robins, there're trees covered with decorations, but there's a notable lack of the big fat man who delivers the toys . . . He's gone. *There used to be five, but that's another story entirely

Discworld - Books

Discworld Mapp Series, Graphic Novels, Novels, a Tourist Guide to Lancre, Death's Domain, Discworld, Discworld Diary,

Discworld - Books

This book consists of articles from Wikia or other free sources online. Commentary (books not included). Pages: 48. Chapters: Discworld Mapp series, Graphic novels, Novels, A Tourist Guide to Lancre, Death's Domain, Discworld, Discworld Diary, List of Discworld Books, Nanny Ogg's Cookbook, Once More* With Footnotes, Rincewind series, The Art of Discworld, The Discworld Almanak, The Discworld Companion, The Pratchett Portfolio, The Science of Discworld, The Streets of Ankh-Morpork, The Unseen University Challenge, The Unseen University Cut Out Book, Death's Domain, A Hat Full of Sky, Carpe Jugulum, Equal Rites, Eric, Feet of Clay, Going Postal, Good Omens, Guards! Guards!, Hogfather, Interesting Times, I Shall Wear Midnight, Jingo, Lords and Ladies, Making Money, Maskerade, Men at Arms, Monstrous Regiment, Mort, Moving Pictures, Nation, Night Watch, Pyramids, Pyramids, Reaper Man, Small Gods, Soul Music, Sourcery, The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents, The Carpet People, The Colour of Magic, The Fifth Elephant, The Last Continent, The Last Hero, The Light Fantastic, The Truth, The Wee Free Men, Thief of Time, Thud!, Wintersmith, Witches Abroad, Wyrd Sisters. Excerpt: A Tourist Guide To Lancre is the third book in the Discworld Mapp series, and the first to be illustrated by Paul Kidby. As with the other maps, the basic design and booklet were compiled by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Briggs. The Mapp shows the mountain country of Lancre, with the Ramtops drawn in a vertigo-inducing perspective shot, rather than as a relief diagram. The accompanying booklet details the history, geography and folklore of the country, with contributions from both Gytha Ogg (anticipating the style of Nanny Ogg's Cookbook) and Eric Wheelbrace, the Discworld's most famous hillwalker (a parody of Alfred Wainwright). The Death series is one of the trilogies which make up the Discworld books. File: TCoM.cover.jpgCover of an early edition of The Colour of Magic; art by...

Pyramids

A Novel of Discworld

Pyramids

Pyramids is the seventh book in the award-winning comic fantasy Discworld series by Terry Pratchett. In Pyramids, you'll discover the tale of Teppic, a student at the Assassin’s Guild of Ankh-Morpok and prince of the tiny kingdom of Djelibeybi, thrust into the role of pharaoh after his father’s sudden death. It's bad enough being new on the job, but Teppic hasn't a clue as to what a pharaoh is supposed to do. First, there's the monumental task of building a suitable resting place for Dad -- a pyramid to end all pyramids. Then there are the myriad administrative duties, such as dealing with mad priests, sacred crocodiles, and marching mummies. And to top it all off, the adolescent pharaoh discovers deceit, betrayal—not to mention a headstrong handmaiden—at the heart of his realm. Sometimes being a god is no fun at all...

The Turtle Moves!

Discworld's Story Unauthorized

The Turtle Moves!

After growing from humble beginnings as a Sword & Sorcery parody to more than 30 volumes of wit, wisdom, and whimsy, the Discworld series has become a phenomenon unlike any other. Now, in The Turtle Moves!, Lawrence Watt-Evans presents a story-by-story history of Discworld’s evolution as well as essays on Pratchett’s place in literary canon, the nature of the Disc itself, and the causes and results of the Discworld phenomenon, all refreshingly free of literary jargon littered with informative footnotes. Part breezy reference guide, part droll commentary, The Turtle Moves! will enlighten and entertain every Pratchett reader, from the casual browser to the most devout of Discworld’s fans.

Feet Of Clay

(Discworld Novel 19)

Feet Of Clay

'The work of a prolific humorist at his best' Observer The Discworld is very much like our own - if our own were to consist of a flat planet balanced on the back of four elephants which stand on the back of a giant turtle, that is . . . ____________________ 'Sorry?' said Carrot. If it's just a thing, how can it commit murder? A sword is a thing' - he drew his own sword; it made an almost silken sound - 'and of course you can't blame a sword if someone thrust it at you, sir.' For Commander Vimes, Head of Ankh-Morpork City Watch, life consists of troubling times, linked together by...well, more troubling times. Right now, it’s the latter. There’s a werewolf with pre-lunar tension in the city, and a dwarf with attitude and a golem who’s begun to think for itself, but that’s just ordinary trouble. The real problem is more puzzling - people are being murdered, but there's no trace of anything alive having been at the crime scene. So Vimes not only has to find out whodunit, but howdunit too. He's not even sure what they dun. But soon as he knows what the questions are, he's going to want some answers. ____________________ The Discworld novels can be read in any order but Feet of Clay is the third book in the City Watch series.