Socrates and the Fat Rabbis

To answer this question, Daniel Boyarin looks to an unlikely source: the dialogues of Plato. In these ancient texts he finds similarities, both in their combination of various genres and topics and in their dialogic structure.

Socrates and the Fat Rabbis

What kind of literature is the Talmud? To answer this question, Daniel Boyarin looks to an unlikely source: the dialogues of Plato. In these ancient texts he finds similarities, both in their combination of various genres and topics and in their dialogic structure. But Boyarin goes beyond these structural similarities, arguing also for a cultural relationship. In Socrates and the Fat Rabbis, Boyarin suggests that both the Platonic and the talmudic dialogues are not dialogic at all. Using Michael Bakhtin’s notion of represented dialogue and real dialogism, Boyarin demonstrates, through multiple close readings, that the give-and-take in these texts is actually much closer to a monologue in spirit. At the same time, he shows that there is a dialogism in both texts on a deeper structural level between a voice of philosophical or religious dead seriousness and a voice from within that mocks that very high solemnity at the same time. Boyarin ultimately singles out Menippean satire as the most important genre through which to understand both the Talmud and Plato, emphasizing their seriocomic peculiarity. An innovative advancement in rabbinic studies, as well as a bold and controversial new way of reading Plato, Socrates and the Fat Rabbis makes a major contribution to scholarship on thought and culture of the ancient Mediterranean.

Tradition and the Formation of the Talmud

... single-voiced, rules-oriented discourse that is as coherent as it is flat.48 Daniel
Boyarin's Socrates and the Fat Rabbis generally accepts this contrast, but he
objects to Wimpfheimer's attribution of this reductionism to “the Talmud” as a
whole.

Tradition and the Formation of the Talmud

Tradition and the Formation of the Talmud offers a new perspective on perhaps the most important religious text of the Jewish tradition. It is widely recognized that the creators of the Talmud innovatively interpreted and changed the older traditions on which they drew. Nevertheless, it has been assumed that the ancient rabbis were committed to maintaining continuity with the past. Moulie Vidas argues on the contrary that structural features of the Talmud were designed to produce a discontinuity with tradition, and that this discontinuity was part and parcel of the rabbis' self-conception. Both this self-conception and these structural features were part of a debate within and beyond the Jewish community about the transmission of tradition. Focusing on the Babylonian Talmud, produced in the rabbinic academies of late ancient Mesopotamia, Vidas analyzes key passages to show how the Talmud's creators contrasted their own voice with that of their predecessors. He also examines Zoroastrian, Christian, and mystical Jewish sources to reconstruct the debates and wide-ranging conversations that shaped the Talmud's literary and intellectual character.

Halakhah

Joshua Kulp and Jason Rogoff, Reconstructing the Talmud: An Introduction to the
Academic Study of Rabbinic Literature (New York: Mechon Hadar, ... Daniel
Boyarin, Socrates and the Fat Rabbis (Chicago: University of Chicago Press,
2009).

Halakhah

How the rabbis of the Talmud transformed everything into a legal question—and Jewish law into a way of thinking and talking about everything Though typically translated as “Jewish law,” the term halakhah is not an easy match for what is usually thought of as law. This is because the rabbinic legal system has rarely wielded the political power to enforce its many detailed rules, nor has it ever been the law of any state. Even more idiosyncratically, the talmudic rabbis claim that the study of halakhah is a holy endeavor that brings a person closer to God—a claim no country makes of its law. In this panoramic book, Chaim Saiman traces how generations of rabbis have used concepts forged in talmudic disputation to do the work that other societies assign not only to philosophy, political theory, theology, and ethics but also to art, drama, and literature. In the multifaceted world of halakhah where everything is law, law is also everything, and even laws that serve no practical purpose can, when properly studied, provide surprising insights into timeless questions about the very nature of human existence. What does it mean for legal analysis to connect humans to God? Can spiritual teachings remain meaningful and at the same time rigidly codified? Can a modern state be governed by such law? Guiding readers across two millennia of richly illuminating perspectives, this book shows how halakhah is not just “law” but an entire way of thinking, being, and knowing.

Plato and the Talmud

The Roots of Political Philosophy: Ten Forgotten Socratic Dialogues. Ithaca, NY:
Cornell ... Four Texts on Socrates: Plato's Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito and
Aristophanes' Clouds. Ithaca, NY: ... Socrates and the Fat Rabbis. Chicago and ...

Plato and the Talmud

This innovative study sees the relationship between Athens and Jerusalem through the lens of the Platonic dialogues and the Talmud. Howland argues that these texts are animated by comparable conceptions of the proper roles of inquiry and reasoned debate in religious life, and by a profound awareness of the limits of our understanding of things divine. Insightful readings of Plato's Apology, Euthyphro and chapter three of tractate Ta'anit explore the relationship of prophets and philosophers, fathers and sons, and gods and men (among other themes), bringing to light the tension between rational inquiry and faith that is essential to the speeches and deeds of both Socrates and the Talmudic sages. In reflecting on the pedagogy of these texts, Howland shows in detail how Talmudic aggadah and Platonic drama and narrative speak to different sorts of readers in seeking mimetically to convey the living ethos of rabbinic Judaism and Socratic philosophising.

Socratic Torah

we consider Socratic Torah in its broader rabbinic context, it is striking that
rabbinic authors, rather than portraying merely ... Studies (Evanston, IL:
Northwestern University Press, 1996), 33 and Boyarin, Socrates and the Fat
Rabbis, 146–7. 27.

Socratic Torah

Jenny R. Labendz shows that despite the highly internal and self-referential nature of rabbinic Torah study, some ancient rabbis believed that the involvement of non-Jews in rabbinic intellectual culture was an enriching aspect of rabbinic learning and teaching.

Rabbinic Parodies of Jewish and Christian Literature

The rabbinic parodies share the same “ serious ” goals with the rest of rabbinic
literature , even if they use non - serious means to overcome adversity . The
prevalence 49 Boyarin , Socrates and the Fat Rabbis , 26. For useful definitions
of ...

Rabbinic Parodies of Jewish and Christian Literature

Originally presented as the author's thesis (Ph.D. - Princeton) under the title: Late Antiquity Upside Down: Rabbinic Parodies of Jewish and Christian Literature.

The Jewish Gospels

This provocative book will change the way we think of the Gospels in their Jewish context.” —John J. Collins, Yale Divinity School “It’s certainly noteworthy when one of the world’s leading Jewish scholars publishes a book about ...

The Jewish Gospels

“[A] fascinating recasting of the story of Jesus.” —Elliot Wolfson, New York University In July 2008, a front-page story in the New York Times reported on the discovery of an ancient Hebrew tablet, dating from before the birth of Jesus, which predicted a Messiah who would rise from the dead after three days. Commenting on this startling discovery at the time, noted Talmud scholar Daniel Boyarin argued that “some Christians will find it shocking—a challenge to the uniqueness of their theology.” Guiding us through a rich tapestry of new discoveries and ancient scriptures, The Jewish Gospels makes the powerful case that our conventional understandings of Jesus and of the origins of Christianity are wrong. In Boyarin’s scrupulously illustrated account, the coming of the Messiah was fully imagined in the ancient Jewish texts. Jesus, moreover, was embraced by many Jews as this person, and his core teachings were not at all a break from Jewish beliefs and teachings. Jesus and his followers, Boyarin shows, were simply Jewish. What came to be known as Christianity came much later, as religious and political leaders sought to impose a new religious orthodoxy that was not present at the time of Jesus’s life. In the vein of Elaine Pagels’s The Gnostic Gospels, here is a brilliant new work that will break open some of our culture’s most cherished assumptions. “A brilliant and momentous book.” —Karen L. King, Harvard Divinity School “Raises profound questions . . . This provocative book will change the way we think of the Gospels in their Jewish context.” —John J. Collins, Yale Divinity School “It’s certainly noteworthy when one of the world’s leading Jewish scholars publishes a book about Jesus . . . Extremely stimulating.” —Daniel C. Peterson, The Deseret News

Becoming the People of the Talmud

See Daniel Boyarin, Socrates and the Fat Rabbis (Chicago, 2009). On 24 (and in
one of the opening epigraphs), Boyarin recalls that his teacher, Professor Saul
Lieberman, had claimed that the Greek work of Lucian, a second- century ...

Becoming the People of the Talmud

Talya Fishman explores the impact of the textualization process in medieval Europe on the Babylonian Talmud's roles within Jewish culture.

The End of Dialogue in Antiquity

This article is doomed to form a chapter (or perhaps two, or perhaps parts of two,
or to have its disjecta membra used in several chapters) of my book in progress:
Socrates and the Fat Rabbis. ' This characteristic has been known historically on
 ...

The End of Dialogue in Antiquity

This book is a general and systematic study of the genre of dialogue in antiquity, investigating why dialogue matters.

Year Book of the Central Conference of American Rabbis

... When the Temple shall be rebuilt I will bring a fat burnt - offering as an
expiation ; " *** of R. Gamaliel , who in a similar vein ... 6la . orange meat , the
admirer of Socrates the Ge le 212 CENTRAL CONFERENCE OF AMERICAN
RABBIS .

Year Book of the Central Conference of American Rabbis


Year Book of the Central Conference of American Rabbis

Central Conference of American Rabbis ... When the Temple shall be rebuilt I will
bring a fat burnt - offering as an expiation ; 994 of R . Gamaliel , who in a similar
vein defended his treatment of his slave Tobi , “ because he ( Tobi ) was a great ...

Year Book of the Central Conference of American Rabbis

Containing the proceedings of the convention...

Ihya

Ihya


Baseball and Philosophy

Our Big, Fat, Greek Democracy The truth is, many famous philosophers besides
Smith have argued in favor of personality conflicts. In the time of Pericles, it was
Socrates (470–399 b.c.e.) who staked his life on his freedom to irritate the
majority. ... While in jail, King received a letter from rabbis and priests imploring
him to.

Baseball and Philosophy

Baseball and Philosophy brings together two high-powered pastimes: the sport of baseball and the academic discipline of philosophy. Eric Bronson asked eighteen young professors to provide their profound analysis of some aspect of baseball. The result offers surprisingly deep insights into this most American of games. The contributors include many of the leading voices in the burgeoning new field of philosophy of sport, plus a few other talented philosophers with a personal interest in baseball. A few of the contributors are also drawn from academic areas outside philosophy: statistics, law, and history. This volume gives the thoughtful baseball fan substancial material to think more deeply about. What moral issues are raised by the Intentional Walk? Do teams sometimes benefit from the self-interested behavior of their individual members? How can Zen be applied to hitting? Is it ethical to employ deception in sports? Can a game be defined by its written rules or are there also other constraints? What can the U.S. Supreme Court learn from umpiring? Why should baseball be the only industry exempt from antitrust laws? What part does luck play in any game of skill?

Hope Dies Last

Taken together, this collection of interviews tells an inspiring story of optimism and persistence, told in voices that resonate with the eloquence of conviction. “The value of Hope Dies Last lies not in what it teaches readers about its ...

Hope Dies Last

America’s most inspirational voices, in their own words: “If you’re looking for a reason to act and dream again, you’ll find it in the pages of this book” (Chicago Tribune). Published when Studs Terkel was ninety-one years old, this astonishing oral history tackles one of the famed journalist’s most elusive subjects: Hope. Where does it come from? What are its essential qualities? How do we sustain it in the darkest of times? An alternative, more personal chronicle of the “American century,” Hope Dies Last is a testament to the indefatigable spirit that Studs has always embodied, and an inheritance for those who, by taking a stand, are making concrete the dreams of today. A former death row inmate who served nearly twenty years for a crime he did not commit discusses his never-ending fight for justice. Tom Hayden, author of The Port Huron Statement, contemplates the legacy of 1960s student activism. Liberal economist John Kenneth Galbraith reflects on the enduring problem of corporate malfeasance. From a doctor who teaches his young students compassion to the retired brigadier general who flew the Enola Gay over Hiroshima, these interviews tell us much about the power of the American dream and the force of individuals who advocate for a better world. With grace and warmth, Terkel’s subjects express their secret hopes and dreams. Taken together, this collection of interviews tells an inspiring story of optimism and persistence, told in voices that resonate with the eloquence of conviction. “The value of Hope Dies Last lies not in what it teaches readers about its narrow subject, but in the fascinating stories it reveals, and the insight it allows into the vast range of human experience.” —The A.V. Club “Very Terkelesque—by now the man requires an adjective of his own.” —Margaret Atwood, The New York Times Review of Books “An American treasure.” —Cornel West

Encyclop dia metropolitana or System of universal knowledge

Fat of the snake , 218 . ... 115 ; | Fire , relation of , by Bede , 268 . attached , 47 ;
the Romans in the rabbinical exorcism , Fire the symbol of love , 108 ; swore by
them ... Gimli or heaven , 123 . cussed by Socrates and Plato , France , astrology
in ...

Encyclop  dia metropolitana  or  System of universal knowledge


The Occult Sciences

Fat of the snake , 218 . ... Cuclid the Socratic , 45 . ... 115 ; Fire , relation of , by
Bede , 268 . attached , 47 ; the Romans in the rabbinical exorcism , Fire the
symbol of love , 108 ; swore by them , 47 ; their chief 173 . the fire of purgatory ,
136 ; fire ...

The Occult Sciences


New Outlook

And whoever has a fat legs were in the air while his head was making 80 set
eyes , tongues , and fists at work . ... We remember Socrates's death , and the
with striking emphasis that he was here , not to will make Dash jump through
paper rings ; we fine - spun arguments with which he tried to assure can ... Their
fame is world - wide . winter , big woods in which to hunt for birds ' nests rabbi
Nicodemus .

New Outlook


Ramus Critical Studies in Greek and Roman Literature

... 1992 ) , 93ff . , stress Socratic necessity as a way of resolving the contradiction
in the text ( see my discussion below ) . ... This sounds very much like ' visiting the
iniquity the fat upon the sons down to the third and fourth generation of those that
hate me ' ( Ex . 20 : 5 , 34 : 7 ; Deut . ... Cataloguing the laws and beliefs he does
mention , and comparing them to the rabbinic corpus , have been attempted ...

Ramus  Critical Studies in Greek and Roman Literature


The Encyclop dia Britannica

Up to this point the brotherhood of dervishes , was himself a Khorásání of blanks
are fat ; they are now raised or ... kind , extending to death itself , as in the ship in
the Hebrew polity ; so was it from a very early case of Socrates , are frequent , but
they are not of the period in the Christian church . One marked differnature of
penance , not having the amendment of the ence between the Rabbinical and
the ...

The Encyclop  dia Britannica