Solving Dynamic General Equilibrium Models Using a Second order Approximation to the Policy Function

This paper derives a second-order approximation to the solution of a general class of discrete- time rational expectations models.

Solving Dynamic General Equilibrium Models Using a Second order Approximation to the Policy Function

This paper derives a second-order approximation to the solution of a general class of discrete- time rational expectations models. The main theoretical contribution of the paper is to show that for any model belonging to the general class considered, the coefficients on the terms linear and quadratic in the state vector in a second-order expansion of the decision rule are independent of the volatility of the exogenous shocks. In other words, these coefficients must be the same in the stochastic and the deterministic versions of the model. Thus, up to second order, the presence of uncertainty affects only the constant term of the decision rules. In addition, the paper presents a set of MATLAB programs designed to compute the coefficients of the second-order approximation. The validity and applicability of the proposed method is illustrated by solving the dynamics of a number of model economies.

Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling

Aggregate disturbances, monetary policy and the macroeconomy: the FRB/US perspective. Fed. Reserv. Bull. 85, 1e19. ... Solving dynamic general equilibrium models using a second-order approximation to the policy function. J. Econ. Dynam.

Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling

Top scholars synthesize and analyze scholarship on this widely used tool of policy analysis in 27 articles, setting forth its accomplishments, difficulties, and means of implementation. Though CGE modeling does not play a prominent role in top U.S. graduate schools, it is employed universally in the development of economic policy. This collection is particularly important because it presents a history of modeling applications and examines competing points of view. Presents coherent summaries of CGE theories that inform major model types Covers the construction of CGE databases, model solving, and computer-assisted interpretation of results Shows how CGE modeling has made a contribution to economic policy

Dynamic General Equilibrium Modeling

Solving Dynamic General Equilibrium Models Using a Second-Order Approximation to the Policy Function. Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control. Vol. 28. pp. 755-775. Shorrocks, Anthony F. 1976. Income Mobility and the Markov Assumption.

Dynamic General Equilibrium Modeling

Modern business cycle theory and growth theory uses stochastic dynamic general equilibrium models. In order to solve these models, economists need to use many mathematical tools. This book presents various methods in order to compute the dynamics of general equilibrium models. In part I, the representative-agent stochastic growth model is solved with the help of value function iteration, linear and linear quadratic approximation methods, parameterised expectations and projection methods. In order to apply these methods, fundamentals from numerical analysis are reviewed in detail. In particular, the book discusses issues that are often neglected in existing work on computational methods, e.g. how to find a good initial value. In part II, the authors discuss methods in order to solve heterogeneous-agent economies. In such economies, the distribution of the individual state variables is endogenous. This part of the book also serves as an introduction to the modern theory of distribution economics. Applications include the dynamics of the income distribution over the business cycle or the overlapping-generations model. In an accompanying home page to this book, computer codes to all applications can be downloaded.

The Oxford Handbook of Computational Economics and Finance

Calculating and using second-order accurate solutions of discrete time dynamic equilibrium models. Journal of Economic Dynamic and ... Solving dynamic general equilibrium models using a second-order approximation to the policy function.

The Oxford Handbook of Computational Economics and Finance

The Oxford Handbook of Computational Economics and Finance provides a survey of both the foundations of and recent advances in the frontiers of analysis and action. It is both historically and interdisciplinarily rich and also tightly connected to the rise of digital society. It begins with the conventional view of computational economics, including recent algorithmic development in computing rational expectations, volatility, and general equilibrium. It then moves from traditional computing in economics and finance to recent developments in natural computing, including applications of nature-inspired intelligence, genetic programming, swarm intelligence, and fuzzy logic. Also examined are recent developments of network and agent-based computing in economics. How these approaches are applied is examined in chapters on such subjects as trading robots and automated markets. The last part deals with the epistemology of simulation in its trinity form with the integration of simulation, computation, and dynamics. Distinctive is the focus on natural computationalism and the examination of the implications of intelligent machines for the future of computational economics and finance. Not merely individual robots, but whole integrated systems are extending their "immigration" to the world of Homo sapiens, or symbiogenesis.

Handbook of Macroeconomics

Solving dynamic general equilibrium models using a second-order approximation to the policy function. J. Econ. Dyn. Control 28, 755–775. Schorfheide, F., 2000. Loss function-based evaluation of DSGE models. J. Appl. Econ. 15, 645–670.

Handbook of Macroeconomics

Handbook of Macroeconomics surveys all major advances in macroeconomic scholarship since the publication of Volume 1 (1999), carefully distinguishing between empirical, theoretical, methodological, and policy issues. It courageously examines why existing models failed during the financial crisis, and also addresses well-deserved criticism head on. With contributions from the world's chief macroeconomists, its reevaluation of macroeconomic scholarship and speculation on its future constitute an investment worth making. Serves a double role as a textbook for macroeconomics courses and as a gateway for students to the latest research Acts as a one-of-a-kind resource as no major collections of macroeconomic essays have been published in the last decade

Methods for Applied Macroeconomic Research

Recursive Macroeconomic Theory, 2nd edn. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Schmitt-Grohe, S., and M. Uribe. 2004. Solving dynamic general equilibrium models using a second order approximation to the policy function. Journal of Economic Dynamics ...

Methods for Applied Macroeconomic Research

The last twenty years have witnessed tremendous advances in the mathematical, statistical, and computational tools available to applied macroeconomists. This rapidly evolving field has redefined how researchers test models and validate theories. Yet until now there has been no textbook that unites the latest methods and bridges the divide between theoretical and applied work. Fabio Canova brings together dynamic equilibrium theory, data analysis, and advanced econometric and computational methods to provide the first comprehensive set of techniques for use by academic economists as well as professional macroeconomists in banking and finance, industry, and government. This graduate-level textbook is for readers knowledgeable in modern macroeconomic theory, econometrics, and computational programming using RATS, MATLAB, or Gauss. Inevitably a modern treatment of such a complex topic requires a quantitative perspective, a solid dynamic theory background, and the development of empirical and numerical methods--which is where Canova's book differs from typical graduate textbooks in macroeconomics and econometrics. Rather than list a series of estimators and their properties, Canova starts from a class of DSGE models, finds an approximate linear representation for the decision rules, and describes methods needed to estimate their parameters, examining their fit to the data. The book is complete with numerous examples and exercises. Today's economic analysts need a strong foundation in both theory and application. Methods for Applied Macroeconomic Research offers the essential tools for the next generation of macroeconomists.

Handbook of Computational Economics

Solving dynamic general equilibrium models using a second-order approximation to the policy function. Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control 28 (4), 755–775. Scott, D., Sain, S., 2005. Multidimensional density estimation.

Handbook of Computational Economics

Handbook of Computational Economics summarizes recent advances in economic thought, revealing some of the potential offered by modern computational methods. With computational power increasing in hardware and algorithms, many economists are closing the gap between economic practice and the frontiers of computational mathematics. In their efforts to accelerate the incorporation of computational power into mainstream research, contributors to this volume update the improvements in algorithms that have sharpened econometric tools, solution methods for dynamic optimization and equilibrium models, and applications to public finance, macroeconomics, and auctions. They also cover the switch to massive parallelism in the creation of more powerful computers, with advances in the development of high-power and high-throughput computing. Much more can be done to expand the value of computational modeling in economics. In conjunction with volume one (1996) and volume two (2006), this volume offers a remarkable picture of the recent development of economics as a science as well as an exciting preview of its future potential. Samples different styles and approaches, reflecting the breadth of computational economics as practiced today Focuses on problems with few well-developed solutions in the literature of other disciplines Emphasizes the potential for increasing the value of computational modeling in economics

Structural Macroeconometrics

Solving Dynamic General Equilibrium Models Using a Second-Order Approximation of the Policy Function,” Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, 28, 755–75. Schorfheide, F., 2000. “Loss Function-Based Evaluation of DSGE Models,” ...

Structural Macroeconometrics

The revised edition of the essential resource on macroeconometrics Structural Macroeconometrics provides a thorough overview and in-depth exploration of methodologies, models, and techniques used to analyze forces shaping national economies. In this thoroughly revised second edition, David DeJong and Chetan Dave emphasize time series econometrics and unite theoretical and empirical research, while taking into account important new advances in the field. The authors detail strategies for solving dynamic structural models and present the full range of methods for characterizing and evaluating empirical implications, including calibration exercises, method-of-moment procedures, and likelihood-based procedures, both classical and Bayesian. The authors look at recent strides that have been made to enhance numerical efficiency, consider the expanded applicability of dynamic factor models, and examine the use of alternative assumptions involving learning and rational inattention on the part of decision makers. The treatment of methodologies for obtaining nonlinear model representations has been expanded, and linear and nonlinear model representations are integrated throughout the text. The book offers a rich array of implementation algorithms, sample empirical applications, and supporting computer code. Structural Macroeconometrics is the ideal textbook for graduate students seeking an introduction to macroeconomics and econometrics, and for advanced students pursuing applied research in macroeconomics. The book's historical perspective, along with its broad presentation of alternative methodologies, makes it an indispensable resource for academics and professionals.

International Dimensions of Monetary Policy

Solving dynamic general equilibrium models using a second-order approximation to the policy function. Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control 28 (4): 645–858. ———. 2007a. Optimal inflation stabilization in a medium-scale macroeconomic ...

International Dimensions of Monetary Policy

United States monetary policy has traditionally been modeled under the assumption that the domestic economy is immune to international factors and exogenous shocks. Such an assumption is increasingly unrealistic in the age of integrated capital markets, tightened links between national economies, and reduced trading costs. International Dimensions of Monetary Policy brings together fresh research to address the repercussions of the continuing evolution toward globalization for the conduct of monetary policy. In this comprehensive book, the authors examine the real and potential effects of increased openness and exposure to international economic dynamics from a variety of perspectives. Their findings reveal that central banks continue to influence decisively domestic economic outcomes—even inflation—suggesting that international factors may have a limited role in national performance. International Dimensions of Monetary Policy will lead the way in analyzing monetary policy measures in complex economies.

Stochastic Dynamic Macroeconomics

American Economic Review 90, no. 5: 1136–1159. Schmidt-Grohe, S., and H. Uribe. (2004). “Solving Dynamic General Equilibrium Models Using a Second-Order Approximation to the Policy Function.” Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control ...

Stochastic Dynamic Macroeconomics

This is a book on stochastic dynamic macroeconomics from a Keynesian perspective. It shows that including Keynesian features in intertemporal models considerably contributes to resolve major puzzles arising in the context of the Dynamic General Equilibrium (DGE) model. It also demonstrates that including microeconomic intertemporal behavior of economic agents in macroeconomics is not inconsistent with Keynesian economics.

Dynamic Macroeconomics

Solving Dynamic General Equilibrium Models Using a Second-Order Approximation to the Policy Function.” Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control 28(4):755–775. Seater, J. J. 1993. “Ricardian Equivalence.” Journal of Economic Literature ...

Dynamic Macroeconomics

An advanced treatment of modern macroeconomics, presented through a sequence of dynamic equilibrium models, with discussion of the implications for monetary and fiscal policy. This textbook offers an advanced treatment of modern macroeconomics, presented through a sequence of dynamic general equilibrium models based on intertemporal optimization on the part of economic agents. The book treats macroeconomics as applied and policy-oriented general equilibrium analysis, examining a number of models, each of which is suitable for investigating specific issues but may be unsuitable for others. After presenting a brief survey of the evolution of macroeconomics and the key facts about long-run economic growth and aggregate fluctuations, the book introduces the main elements of the intertemporal approach through a series of two-period competitive general equilibrium models—the simplest possible intertemporal models. This sets the stage for the remainder of the book, which presents models of economic growth, aggregate fluctuations, and monetary and fiscal policy. The text focuses on a full analysis of a limited number of key intertemporal models, which are stripped down to essentials so that students can focus on the dynamic properties of the models. Exercises encourage students to try their hands at solving versions of the dynamic models that define modern macroeconomics. Appendixes review the main mathematical techniques needed to analyze optimizing dynamic macroeconomic models. The book is suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate students who have some knowledge of economic theory and mathematics for economists.

IMF Staff Papers Volume 57 No 1

Schmitt-Grohe ́, S., and M. Uribe, 2004, ''Solving Dynamic General Equilibrium Models using a Second-order Approximation to the Policy Function,'' Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Vol. 28, No. 4, pp. 755–75.

IMF Staff Papers  Volume 57  No  1

Do highly indebted countries suffer from a debt overhang? Can debt relief foster their growth rates? To answer these important questions, this article looks at how the debt-growth relation varies with indebtedness levels, as well as with the quality of policies and institutions, in a panel of developing countries. The main findings are that, in countries with good policies and institutions, there is evidence of debt overhang when the net present value of debt rises above 20–25 percent of GDP; however, debt becomes irrelevant above 70–80 percent. In countries with bad policies and institutions, thresholds appear to be lower, but the evidence of debt overhang is weaker and we cannot rule out that debt is always irrelevant. Indeed, in such countries, as well as in countries with high indebtedness levels, investment does not depend on debt levels. The analysis suggests that not all countries are likely to profit from debt relief, and thus that a one-size-fits-all debt relief approach might not be the most appropriate one.

Economic Dynamics in Discrete Time second edition

An optimization based econometric framework for the evaluation of monetary policy . In Oliver J. Blanchard and Stanley Fischer ... Solving dynamic general equilibrium models using a second - order approximation to the policy function .

Economic Dynamics in Discrete Time  second edition

A unified and comprehensive introduction to the analytical and numerical tools for solving dynamic economic problems; substantially revised for the second edition. This book offers a unified, comprehensive, and up-to-date treatment of analytical and numerical tools for solving dynamic economic problems. The focus is on introducing recursive methods—an important part of every economist's set of tools—and readers will learn to apply recursive methods to a variety of dynamic economic problems. The book is notable for its combination of theoretical foundations and numerical methods. Each topic is first described in theoretical terms, with explicit definitions and rigorous proofs; numerical methods and computer codes to implement these methods follow. Drawing on the latest research, the book covers such cutting-edge topics as asset price bubbles, recursive utility, robust control, policy analysis in dynamic New Keynesian models with the zero lower bound on interest rates, and Bayesian estimation of dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models. This second edition has been substantially updated. Responding to renewed interest in modeling with multiple equilibria, it incorporates new material on this topic throughout. It offers an entirely new chapter on deterministic nonlinear systems, and provides new material on such topics as linear planar systems, chaos, bifurcations, indeterminacy and sunspot solutions, pruning nonlinear solutions, the bandit problem, rational inattention models, bequests, self-fulfilling prophecies, the cyclical behavior of unemployment and vacancies, and the long-run risk model. The exposition of each chapter has been revised and improved, and many new figures, Matlab codes, and exercises have been added. A student solutions manual can be purchased separately.

Search in the Labor Market under Imperfectly Insurable Income Risk

Kim, H., J. Kim, E. Schaumburg, and C. A. Sims, Calculating and using second order accurate solution of discrete time dynamic equilibrium models. Econometric Society 2004 North American Winter Meetings 411, Econometric Society, Aug.

Search in the Labor Market under Imperfectly Insurable Income Risk

This paper develops a general equilibrium model with unemployment and noncooperative wage determination to analyze the importance of incomplete markets when risk-averse agents are subject to idiosyncratic employment shocks. A version of the model calibrated to the U.S. shows that market incompleteness affects individual behavior and aggregate conditions: it reduces wages and unemployment but increases vacancies. Additionally, the model explains the average level of unemployment insurance observed in the U.S. A key mechanism is the joint influence of imperfect insurance and risk aversion in the wage bargaining. The paper also proposes a novel solution to solve this heterogeneous-agent model.

Interest and Prices

Foundations of a Theory of Monetary Policy Michael Woodford ... Economics 45: 211–246, 2000. , “Solving Dynamic General Equilibrium Models Using a Second-Order Approximation to the Policy Function,” NBER Technical Working Paper No.

Interest and Prices

With the collapse of the Bretton Woods system, any pretense of a connection of the world's currencies to any real commodity has been abandoned. Yet since the 1980s, most central banks have abandoned money-growth targets as practical guidelines for monetary policy as well. How then can pure "fiat" currencies be managed so as to create confidence in the stability of national units of account? Interest and Prices seeks to provide theoretical foundations for a rule-based approach to monetary policy suitable for a world of instant communications and ever more efficient financial markets. In such a world, effective monetary policy requires that central banks construct a conscious and articulate account of what they are doing. Michael Woodford reexamines the foundations of monetary economics, and shows how interest-rate policy can be used to achieve an inflation target in the absence of either commodity backing or control of a monetary aggregate. The book further shows how the tools of modern macroeconomic theory can be used to design an optimal inflation-targeting regime--one that balances stabilization goals with the pursuit of price stability in a way that is grounded in an explicit welfare analysis, and that takes account of the "New Classical" critique of traditional policy evaluation exercises. It thus argues that rule-based policymaking need not mean adherence to a rigid framework unrelated to stabilization objectives for the sake of credibility, while at the same time showing the advantages of rule-based over purely discretionary policymaking.

Introduction to Quantitative Macroeconomics Using Julia

TABLE 5.5 Decision rules θ0 θ2 θ3 θ4 T0 θ1 ) 0.117961 0.361884 0.00831576 3.45746e-5 −4.07343e-6 T1 (at ) 0.493804 ... M. Uribe, Solving dynamic general equilibrium models using a second-order approximation to the policy function, ...

Introduction to Quantitative Macroeconomics Using Julia

Introduction to Quantitative Macroeconomics Using Julia: From Basic to State-of-the-Art Computational Techniques facilitates access to fundamental techniques in computational and quantitative macroeconomics. It focuses on the recent and very promising software, Julia, which offers a MATLAB-like language at speeds comparable to C/Fortran, also discussing modeling challenges that make quantitative macroeconomics dynamic, a key feature that few books on the topic include for macroeconomists who need the basic tools to build, solve and simulate macroeconomic models. This book neatly fills the gap between intermediate macroeconomic books and modern DSGE models used in research. Combines an introduction to Julia, with the specific needs of macroeconomic students who are interested in DSGE models and PhD students and researchers interested in building DSGE models Teaches fundamental techniques in quantitative macroeconomics by introducing theoretical elements of key macroeconomic models and their potential algorithmic implementations Exposes researchers working in macroeconomics to state-of-the-art computational techniques for simulating and solving DSGE models

Fiscal policy under rules and restrictions

Schimitt-Groh ́e, S., Uribe, M., 2004. Solving Dynamic General Equilibrium Models Using a Second-Order Approximation to the Policy Function. Journal of Economics Dynamic and Control, vol. 28, no. 4, (January), pp. 755-775.

Fiscal policy under rules and restrictions


Bayesian Estimation of DSGE Models

Schmitt-Groh ́e, S., and M. Uribe (2004): ''Solving Dynamic General Equilibrium Models Using a Second-Order Approximation to the Policy Function,'' Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, 28, 755–775. (2012): ''What's News in Business ...

Bayesian Estimation of DSGE Models

Dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models have become one of the workhorses of modern macroeconomics and are extensively used for academic research as well as forecasting and policy analysis at central banks. This book introduces readers to state-of-the-art computational techniques used in the Bayesian analysis of DSGE models. The book covers Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques for linearized DSGE models, novel sequential Monte Carlo methods that can be used for parameter inference, and the estimation of nonlinear DSGE models based on particle filter approximations of the likelihood function. The theoretical foundations of the algorithms are discussed in depth, and detailed empirical applications and numerical illustrations are provided. The book also gives invaluable advice on how to tailor these algorithms to specific applications and assess the accuracy and reliability of the computations. Bayesian Estimation of DSGE Models is essential reading for graduate students, academic researchers, and practitioners at policy institutions.