On Sonic Art

On Sonic Art

First Published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

On Sonic Art

On Sonic Art

In this newly revised book On Sonic Art, Trevor Wishart takes a wide-ranging look at the new developments in music-making and musical aesthetics made possible by the advent of the computer and digital information processing. His emphasis is on musical rather than technical matters. Beginning with a critical analysis of the assumptions underlying the Western musical tradition and the traditional acoustic theories of Pythagoras and Helmholtz, he goes on to look in detail at such topics as the musical organization of complex sound-objects, using and manipulating representational sounds and the various dimensions of human and non-human utterance. In so doing, he seeks to learn lessons from areas (poetry and sound-poetry, film, sound effects and animal communication) not traditionally associated with the field of music.

In the Blink of an Ear

Toward a Non-Cochlear Sonic Art

In the Blink of an Ear

This title traces the interactions and mutual influences of art and music over the past 60 years.

Sonic Art

An Introduction to Electroacoustic Music Composition

Sonic Art

Written by an active composer, performer and educator, Sonic Art: An Introduction to Electroacoustic Music Composition provides a clear and informative introduction to the compositional techniques behind electroacoustic music. It brings together theory, aesthetics, context and practical applications to allow students to start thinking about sound creatively, and gives them the tools to compose meaningful sonic art works. In addition to explaining the techniques and philosophies of sonic art, the book examines over forty composers and their works, introducing the history and context of notable pieces, and includes chapters on how to present compositions professionally, in performance and online. The book is supported by an online software toolkit which enables readers to start creating their own compositions. Encouraging a ‘hands on’ approach to working with sound, Sonic Art is the perfect introduction for anyone interested in electroacoustic music and crafting art from sounds.

The Fundamentals of Sonic Art and Sound Design

The Fundamentals of Sonic Art and Sound Design

Sound is all around. In movies. On TV. On the radio. Now the idea that sound can be an artistic medium in its own right is shaking the art world. Written by an authority in the field, The Fundamentals of Sonic Arts and Sound Design describes and begins the process of defining this entirely new subject. Topics covered include new and radical approaches to sound recording, performance, installation works and exhibitions, plus visits with sonic artists and sound designers. Designed for students, yet packed with exciting examples of the principles and practice of this new art form, this book is on the cutting edge where technology and art meet.

Music and Sonic Art

Theories and Practices

Music and Sonic Art

This volume brings together practitioners and theorists of music and sonic art. Contributions explore a wide range of historical, artistic, pedagogical and critical issues from multiple perspectives, emphasizing the continuities and links along a broad spectrum of hearing and listening practices and art-making that use sound.

Understanding the Art of Sound Organization

Understanding the Art of Sound Organization

The art of sound organization, also known as electroacoustic music, uses sounds not available to traditional music making, including prerecorded, synthesized, and processed sounds. The body of work of such sound-based music (which includes electroacoustic art music, turntable composition, computer games, and acoustic and digital sound installations) has developed more rapidly than its musicology. Understanding the Art of Sound Organization proposes the first general foundational framework for the study of the art of sound organization, defining terms, discussing relevant forms of music, categorizing works, and setting sound-based music in interdisciplinary contexts. Leigh Landy's goal in this book is not only to create a theoretical framework but also to make the work more accessible--to suggest a way to understand sound-based music, to give a listener what he terms "something to hold on to," for example, by connecting elements in a work to everyday experience. Landy considers the difficulties of categorizing works and discusses such types of works as sonic art and electroacoustic music, pointing out where they overlap and how they are distinctive. He proposes a "sound-based music paradigm" that transcends such traditional categories as art and pop music. Landy defines patterns that suggest a general framework and places the studies of sound-based music into interdisciplinary contexts, from acoustics to semiotics, proposing a holistic research approach that considers the interconnectedness of a given work's history, theory, technological aspects, and social impact. The author's ElectroAcoustic Resource Site (EARS, www.ears.dmu.ac.uk), the architecture of which parallels this book's structure, offers updated bibliographic resource abstracts and related information. Leigh Landy is a composer and scholar. He is Director of the Music, Technology, and Innovation Research Centre at De Montfort University, U.K.

Sonic Flux

Sound, Art, and Metaphysics

Sonic Flux

From Edison’s invention of the phonograph through contemporary field recording and sound installation, artists have become attracted to those domains against which music has always defined itself: noise, silence, and environmental sound. Christoph Cox argues that these developments in the sonic arts are not only aesthetically but also philosophically significant, revealing sound to be a continuous material flow to which human expressions contribute but which precedes and exceeds those expressions. Cox shows how, over the course of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, philosophers and sonic artists have explored this “sonic flux.” Through the philosophical analysis of works by John Cage, Maryanne Amacher, Max Neuhaus, Christian Marclay, and many others, Sonic Flux contributes to the development of a materialist metaphysics and poses a challenge to the prevailing positions in cultural theory, proposing a realist and materialist aesthetics able to account not only for sonic art but for artistic production in general.

Resonance

Philosophy for Sonic Art

Resonance

The crisis of music and the proliferation of the digital pose unique challenges to thinking about sound. In an attempt to recenter a philosophy of music within - and radiating out from - the figure of resonance, Peter Price formulates a new philosophy of the sonic, offering an incisive reading of Heidegger, Deleuze, Ronell, and Schirmacher, among many others. His approach divests itself of the traditional metaphysics with which music in the West has been so intimately intertwined to become a vibrational ontology and an aesthetics of experimental sonic practice. Reviews: "Resonance in music and in media is both magic and fatal. In his brilliant book Peter Price follows the trace of this ambivalence with philosophical and musical inspiration." Michael Schmidt, Coordinator of Classical Music Online at Bavarian Radio and John Cage Chair at the European Graduate School "This radical contribution to the discipline of sonic theory finds no comfort in the grand narratives of the music establishment. Equally critical of New-Age conceptions and the euphoria of remix culture apologists, Peter Price offers a contemplation in the spirit of a John Cage/Martin Heidegger assemblage that points to openings for a joyful practice of experimental arts." Christian Hanggi, media ecologist About the author: Peter Price is a composer, digital artist, and media theorist. He co-directs thefidget space in Philadelphia, a research laboratory for new forms of art, performance, and media. He holds a PhD from the European Graduate School in Switzerland.

Colloquium

Sound Art and Music

Colloquium

In 2012, Thomas Gardner and Salomé Voegelin hosted a colloquium, entitled "Music - Sound Art: Historical Continuum and Mimetic Fissures", at the London College of Communication, University of the Arts London. This colloquium dealt with the current fervent debate concerning the relationship between sound art and music. This book proposes the opening of the colloquium to a wider readership through the publication of a decisive range of the material that defined the event.