Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora

In this original and interdisciplinary work, Jing Tsu advances the notion of “literary governance” as a way of understanding literary dynamics and production on multiple scales: local, national, global. “Literary governance,” like ...

Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora

In this original and interdisciplinary work, Jing Tsu advances the notion of “literary governance” as a way of understanding literary dynamics and production on multiple scales: local, national, global. “Literary governance,” like political governance, is an exercise of power, but in a “softer” way - it begins with language, rather than governments. In a globalizing world characterized by many diasporas competing for recognition, the global Chinese community has increasingly come to feel the necessity of a “national language,” standardized and privileging its native speakers. As the national language gains power within the diasporic community, members of the diaspora become aware of themselves as a community. Eventually, they move from the internal state of awakened identity to being recognized as a community, and finally exercising power as a community. But this hegemony of the “national language” is constantly being challenged by different, nonstandard language uses, including various Chinese dialects, multiple registers, contested alphabet usage, and Chinese men and women who write in foreign languages. “Literary governance” reflects both the consensus-building power and the inherent divisiveness of these debates about language and is useful as a comparative model for thinking about not only Sinophone, Anglophone, Francophone, Lusophone, and Hispanophone literatures, but also any literary field that is currently expanding beyond the national.

The Chinese Diaspora

In January 1788 , he recruited fifty Chinese sailors , smiths , and carpenters at Macao and Guangzhou ( Canton ) , and shipped them to Nootka Sound on Vancouver Island where they helped him build a small fortress , a dockyard and a ...

The Chinese Diaspora

Leading scholars in the field consider the profound importance of meanings of place and the spatial processes of mobility and settlement for the Chinese overseas. Visit our website for sample chapters!

Chinese Diasporas

Republic of China, after 1927 controlled by the Guomindang, sought to extend its control and supervision over Chinese schools in diaspora. ... 44 Jing Tsu, Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora (Harvard University Press, 2010), 18; Yen, ...

Chinese Diasporas

A concise and compelling survey of Chinese migration in global history centered on Chinese migrants and their families.

Ten Lessons in Modern Chinese History

Making of Southeast Asian Nations: State, Ethnicity, Indigenism and Citizenship (Singapore: World Scientific, 2015); Jing Tsu, Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2010); Andrea Riemenschnitter and ...

Ten Lessons in Modern Chinese History

This book is a timely and solid portrait of modern China from the First Opium War to the Xi Jinping era. Unlike the handful of existing textbooks that only provide narratives, this textbook fashions a new and practical way to study modern China. Written exclusively for university students, A-level or high school teachers and students, it uses primary sources to tell the story of China and introduces them to existing scholarship and academic debate so they can conduct independent research for their essays and dissertations. This book will be required reading for students who embark on the study of Chinese history, politics, economics, diaspora, sociology, literature, cultural, urban and women’s studies. It would be essential reading to journalists, NGO workers, diplomats, government officials, businessmen and travellers.

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Chinese Literatures

(Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2003), 10–12, and Jing Tsu, Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2014), 126–128. 3. See Chen Pingyuan's chapter, “The Story of Literary History,” in this ...

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Chinese Literatures

With over forty original essays, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Chinese Literatures offers an in-depth engagement with the current analytical methodologies and critical practices that are shaping the field in the twenty-first century. Divided into three sections--Structure, Taxonomy, and Methodology--the volume carefully moves across approaches, genres, and forms to address a rich range topics that include popular culture in Late Qing China, Zhang Guangyu's Journey to the West in Cartoons, writings of Southeast Asian migrants in Taiwan, the Chinese Anglophone Novel, and depictions of HIV/AIDS in Chu T'ien-wen's Notes of a Desolate Man.

Global Chinese Literature

The characters that rely on phonetics, in the sense of possessing a sound-bearing component, comprise the greatest ... on the Chinese-language typewriter in the twentieth century, see my Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora (Cambridge, ...

Global Chinese Literature

Presenting an array of cutting edge perspectives on modern Chinese literature in different Sinophone contexts, this volume of essays offers a wide range of critical approaches to the study of an emerging interdisciplinary field.

Signifying the Local

Media Productions Rendered in Local Languages in Mainland China in the New Millennium Jin Liu. and vocabulary, and paid less attention to ... 42 Tsu, Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora, 33. 43 Hu, The Chinese Renaissance, 60.

Signifying the Local

In Signifying the Local, Jin Liu examines contemporary cultural productions rendered in local languages and dialects (fangyan) in the fields of television, cinema, music, and literature in mainland China.

Beyond Sinology

Chinese Writing and the Scripts of Culture Andrea Bachner ... In Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora, Jing Tsu describes the interaction between sinographs and the alphabetic script in the context of Lin Yutang's invention of a Chinese ...

Beyond Sinology

New communication and information technologies remain challenging for the Chinese script, which, unlike alphabetic or other phonetic scripts, relies on multiple signifying principles. In recent decades, this multiplicity has generated a rich corpus of reflection and experimentation in literature, film, visual and performance art, and design and architecture, both within China and different parts of the West. Approaching this history from alternative theoretical perspectives, this volume pinpoints the phenomena binding languages, scripts, and medial expressions to cultural and national identity. Through a complex study of intercultural representations, exchanges, and tensions, the text focuses on the concrete “scripting” of identity and alterity, advancing a new understanding of the links between identity and medium and a new critique of articulations that rely on single, monolithic, and univocal definitions of writing.

Transpacific Community

America, China, and the Rise and Fall of a Cultural Network Richard Jean So. 4. TYPOGRAPHIC ETHNIC MODERNISM 60. ... Jing Tsu, Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2010), 68. 74.

Transpacific Community

In the turbulent years after World War I, a transpacific community of American and Chinese writers and artists emerged to forge new ideas regarding aesthetics, democracy, internationalism, and the political possibilities of art. Breaking with preconceived notions of an "exotic" East, the Americans found in China and in the works of Chinese intellectuals inspiration for leftist and civil rights movements. Chinese writers and intellectuals looked to the American tradition of political democracy to inform an emerging Chinese liberalism. This interaction reflected an unprecedented integration of American and Chinese cultures and a remarkable synthesis of shared ideals and political goals. The transpacific community that came together during this time took advantage of new advances in technology and media, such as the telegraph and radio, to accelerate the exchange of ideas. It created a fast-paced, cross-cultural dialogue that transformed the terms by which the United States and China—or, more broadly, "West" and "East"—knew each other. Transpacific Community follows the left-wing journalist Agnes Smedley's campaign to free the author Ding Ling from prison; Pearl Buck's attempt to fuse Jeffersonian democracy with late Qing visions of equality in The Good Earth; Paul Robeson's collaboration with the musician Liu Liangmo, which drew on Chinese and African American traditions; and the writer Lin Yutang's attempt to create a typewriter for Chinese characters. Together, these individuals produced political projects that synthesized American and Chinese visions of equality and democracy and imagined a new course for East-West relations.

Kingdom of Characters

There has been a resurgence in scholarship on Chinese language history since 2010, extending the field to include questions of language, philology, and regional and global Chinese diaspora. See Jing Tsu, Sound and Script in Chinese ...

Kingdom of Characters

A riveting, masterfully researched account of the bold innovators who adapted the Chinese language to the modern world, transforming China into a superpower in the process What does it take to reinvent the world's oldest living language? China today is one of the world's most powerful nations, yet just a century ago it was a crumbling empire with literacy reserved for the elite few, left behind in the wake of Western technology. In Kingdom of Characters, Jing Tsu shows that China's most daunting challenge was a linguistic one: to make the formidable Chinese language - a 2,200-year-old writing system that was daunting to natives and foreigners alike - accessible to a globalized, digital world. Kingdom of Characters follows the bold innovators who adapted the Chinese script - and the value-system it represents - to the technological advances that would shape the twentieth century and beyond, from the telegram to the typewriter to the smartphone. From the exiled reformer who risked death to advocate for Mandarin as a national language to the imprisoned computer engineer who devised input codes for Chinese characters on the lid of a teacup, generations of scholars, missionaries, librarians, politicians, inventors, nationalists and revolutionaries alike understood the urgency of their task and its world-shaping consequences. With larger-than-life characters and a thrilling narrative, Kingdom of Characters offers an astonishingly original perspective on one of the twentieth century's most dramatic transformations.

Chinese Grammatology

Script Revolution and Literary Modernity, 1916–1958 Yurou Zhong. Shih, Shu-mei, Tsai Chien-hsin, ... China on the Western Front: Britain's Chinese Work Force in the First World War. ... Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora.

Chinese Grammatology

Today, Chinese characters are described as a national treasure, the core of the nation’s civilizational identity. Yet for nearly half of the twentieth century, reformers waged war on the Chinese script. They declared it an archaic hindrance to modernization, portraying the ancient system of writing as a roadblock to literacy and therefore science and democracy. Movements spanning the political spectrum proposed abandonment of characters and alphabetization of Chinese writing, although in the end the Communist Party opted for character simplification. Chinese Grammatology traces the origins, transmutations, and containment of this script revolution to provide a groundbreaking account of its formative effects on Chinese literature and culture, and lasting implications for the encounter between the alphabetic and nonalphabet worlds. Yurou Zhong explores the growth of competing Romanization and Latinization movements aligned with the clashing Nationalists and Communists. She finds surprising affinities between alphabetic reform and modern Chinese literary movements and examines the politics of literacy programs and mass education against the backdrop of war and revolution. Zhong places the Chinese script revolution in the global context of a phonocentric dominance that privileges phonetic writing, contending that the eventual retention of characters constituted an anti-ethnocentric, anti-imperial critique that coincided with postwar decolonization movements and predated the emergence of Deconstructionism. By revealing the consequences of one of the biggest linguistic experiments in history, Chinese Grammatology provides an ambitious rethinking of the origins of Chinese literary modernity and the politics of the science of writing.

Chinese Buddhism in Catholic Philippines

Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Tu, Weiming. 1994. Cultural China: The Periphery as the Center. In The Living Tree: The Changing Meaning of Being Chinese Today, ed.

Chinese Buddhism in Catholic Philippines

Drawing on his personal experience of growing up exposed to the rituals of Chinese Buddhism, and yet embracing Catholicism and being ordained a Jesuit priest, Fr. Ari Dy ventures to examine Chinese Buddhism in the Philippines, analyzing its adaptation to the Philippines and its contribution to conceptions of Chinese identity.

Slow Boat to China and Other Stories

The irony, however, is that he writes this epitaph in an invented script only he can read, meaning that after he dies the ... For useful discussions of Ng Kim Chew's work in English, see Jing Tsu, Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora ...

Slow Boat to China and Other Stories

"Dream and Swine and Aurora," "Deep in the Rubber Forest," "Fish Bones," "Allah's Will," "Monkey Butts, Fire, and Dangerous Things"—Ng Kim Chew's stories are raw, rural, and rich with the traditions of his native Malaysia. They are also full of humor and spirit, demonstrating a deep appreciation for human ingenuity in the face of poverty, oppression, and exile. Ng creatively captures the riot of cultures that roughly coexist on the Malay Peninsula and its surrounding archipelago. Their interplay is heightened by the encroaching forces of globalization, which bring new opportunities for cultural experimentation, but also an added dimension of alienation. In prose that is intimate and atmospheric, these sensitively crafted, resonant stories depict the struggles of individuals torn between their ancestral and adoptive homes, communities pressured by violence, and minority Malaysian Chinese in dynamic tension with the Islamic Malay majority. Told through relatable characters, Ng's tales show why he has become a leading Malaysian writer of Chinese fiction, representing in mood, voice, and rhythm the dislocation of a people and a country in transition.

Reading China Against the Grain

Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora . Cambridge : Harvard University Press , 2010 . Wang , David Der - wei E. Huayifeng : Huayu yuxi wenxue sanlun . # : X w ( When the Wind of the Sinophone Blows : Three Essays on Sinophone Literature ) ...

Reading China Against the Grain

Through an analysis of a wide array of contemporary Chinese literature from inside and outside of China, this volume considers some of the ways in which China and Chineseness are understood and imagined. Using the central theme of the way in which literature has the potential to both reinforce and to undermine a national imaginary, the volume contains chapters offering new perspectives on well-known authors, from Jin Yucheng to Nobel Prize winning Mo Yan, as well as chapters focusing on authors rarely included in discussions of contemporary Chinese literature, such as the expatriate authors Larissa Lai and Xiaolu Guo. The volume is complemented by chapters covering more marginalized literary figures throughout history, such as Macau-born poet Yiling, the Malaysian-born novelist Zhang Guixing, and the ethnically Korean author Kim Hak-ch’ŏl. Invested in issues ranging from identity and representation, to translation and grammar, it is one of the few publications of its kind devoting comparable attention to authors from Mainland China, authors from Manchuria, Macau, and Taiwan, and throughout the global Chinese diaspora. Reading China Against the Grain: Imagining Communities is a rich resource of literary criticism for students and scholars of Chinese studies, sinophone studies, and comparative literature

Science and Technology in Modern China 1880s 1940s

Tsu, Jing 2005. Failure, Nationalism, and Literature: The Making of Modern Chinese Identity 1895–1937. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. ____2010. Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Science and Technology in Modern China  1880s 1940s

Science and Technology in Modern China, 1880s-1940s looks at the transnational routes for the development of science and technology in the first pivotal decades of modern China.

Manchukuo Perspectives

As an ambitious writer, Gu Ding had even more reason to support the Chinese language. ... Jing Tsu, Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2010), 13. 35. Gu, Xin sheng, 73. 36.

Manchukuo Perspectives

This groundbreaking volume critically examines how writers in Japanese-occupied northeast China negotiated political and artistic freedom while engaging their craft amidst an increasing atmosphere of violent conflict and foreign control. The allegedly multiethnic utopian new state of Manchukuo (1932–1945) created by supporters of imperial Japan was intended to corral the creative energies of Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Russians, and Mongols. Yet, the twin poles of utopian promise and resistance to a contested state pulled these intellectuals into competing loyalties, selective engagement, or even exile and death—surpassing neat paradigms of collaboration or resistance. In a semicolony wrapped in the utopian vision of racial inclusion, their literary works articulating national ideals and even the norms of everyday life subtly reflected the complexities and contradictions of the era. Scholars from China, Korea, Japan, and North America investigate cultural production under imperial Japan’s occupation of Manchukuo. They reveal how literature and literary production more generally can serve as a penetrating lens into forgotten histories and the lives of ordinary people confronted with difficult political exigencies. Highlights of the text include transnational perspectives by leading researchers in the field and a memoir by one of Manchukuo’s last living writers. “This first-rate collection offers the most comprehensive overview of Manchukuo literature in any language. Containing an abundance of very original research and analysis, with relevant references to diverse sources in Chinese, English, Japanese, Korean, and Russian, the essays will be welcomed by scholars dealing with literary, historical, political, and colonization issues in Manchukuo and its neighbors.” —Ronald Suleski, Suffolk University, Boston “Manchukuo Perspectives is an excellent contribution to the field. Manchukuo was a fascinating and fraught experiment. Colonialism, imperialism, modernism, and nationalism were just some of the many different forces at play there. With an impressive set of contributors bringing both breadth and depth to the study of these issues, this collection fills a void in our understanding of the cultural and literary production of Manchukuo wonderfully.” —James Carter, Saint Joseph’s University

The Cambridge History of Chinese Literature

... Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora ( Cambridge , MA , forthcoming ) . DAVID DER - WEI WANG is Edward C. Henderson Professor of Chinese Literature at Harvard University . He specializes in modern and contemporary Chinese literature ...

The Cambridge History of Chinese Literature

Stephen Owen is James Bryant Conant Professor of Chinese at Harvard University. --Book Jacket.

The Cambridge History of Chinese Literature From 1375

... Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora ( Cambridge , MA : forthcoming ) . DAVID DER - WEI WANG is Edward C. Henderson Professor of Chinese Literature at Harvard University . He specializes in modern and contemporary Chinese literature ...

The Cambridge History of Chinese Literature  From 1375

Stephen Owen is James Bryant Conant Professor of Chinese at Harvard University. --Book Jacket.

Asia Inside Out

See Qian Quantong, “Tongxin: Zhongguojinhou zhi wenzi wenti” (Correspondence: China's Script Problem in the Present and Future), Xin Qingnian 4 (4) (1918): 70–77. 13. ... See my Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora, ch. 3. 21.

Asia Inside Out

Asia Inside Out reveals the dynamic forces that have linked regions of the world’s largest continent. Connected Places, the second of three volumes, highlights the flows of goods, ideas, and people across natural and political boundaries and illustrates the confluence of factors in the historical construction of place and space.

Archiving Settler Colonialism

It covers Chinese-speaking settlers and immigrant communities as well as borderland cultures that become Sinophone through ... 3 See Jin Tsu's chapter on Chang, titled “Chinese Lessons,” in her Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora.

Archiving Settler Colonialism

Archiving Settler Colonialism: Culture, Race, and Space brings together 15 essays from across the globe, to capture a moment in settler colonial studies that turns increasingly towards new cultural archives for settler colonial research. Essays on hitherto under-examined materials—including postage stamps, musical scores, urban parks, and psychiatric records—reflect on how cultural texts archive moments of settler self-fashioning. Archiving Settler Colonialism also expands settler colonial studies’ reach as an international academic discipline, bringing together scholarly research about the British breakaway settler colonies with underanalyzed non-white, non-Anglophone settler societies. The essays together illustrate settler colonial cultures as—for all their similarities—ultimately divergent constructions, locally situated and produced of specific power relations within the messy operations of imperial domination.