Soviet Bus Stops

These books represent the most comprehensive and diverse collection of Soviet bus stop design ever assembled from: Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Ukraine, Moldova, Armenia, Abkhazia, Georgia, Lithuania, Latvia ...

Soviet Bus Stops

Photographer Christopher Herwig has covered more than 30,000 km by car, bike, bus and taxi in 13 former Soviet countries discovering and documenting these unexpected treasures of modern art. From the shores of the Black Sea to the endless Kazakh steppe, these bus stops show the range of public art from the Soviet era and give a rare glimpse into the creative minds of the time. These books represent the most comprehensive and diverse collection of Soviet bus stop design ever assembled from: Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Ukraine, Moldova, Armenia, Abkhazia, Georgia, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia. With a foreword by writer, critic and television presenter Jonathan Meades. --Volume 1.

Soviet Metro Stations

From extreme marble and chandelier opulence to brutal futuristic minimalist glory, Soviet Metro Stations documents this wealth of diverse architecture.

Soviet Metro Stations

From the author of Soviet Bus Stops, an underground trip through the Soviet Metro "For us," said Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev in his memoirs, "there was something supernatural about the Metro." Visiting any of the dozen or so Metro networks built across the Soviet Union between the 1930s and 1980s, it is easy to see why. Rather than the straightforward systems of London, Paris or New York, these networks were used as a propaganda artwork--a fusion of sculpture, architecture and art that combined Byzantine, medieval, baroque and constructivist ideas and infused them with the notion that communism would mean a "communal luxury" for all. Today these astonishing spaces remain the closest realization of a Soviet utopia. Following his bestselling quest for Soviet Bus Stops, Canadian photographer Christopher Herwig has completed a subterranean expedition photographing the stations of each Metro network of the former USSR. From extreme marble and chandelier opulence to brutal futuristic minimalist glory, Soviet Metro Stations documents this wealth of diverse architecture. Along the way Herwig captures the elements that make up this singular Soviet experience: neon, concrete, escalators, signage, mosaics and relief sculptures all combine to build a vivid map of the Soviet Metro. Soviet Metro Stations includes an essay by the leading architectural and political writer Owen Hatherley, author of the acclaimed books Landscapes of Communism (2015), Trans-Europe Express (2018) and The Adventures of Owen Hatherley in the Post-Soviet Space.

Post Soviet Nostalgia

Soviet Ghosts: The Soviet Union Abandoned: A Communist Empire in Decay. Darlington: Carpet Bombing Culture. Herwig, Christopher. 2014. Soviet Bus Stops. Vol. 1. London: Fuel Design & Publishing. Herwig, Christopher. 2017.

Post Soviet Nostalgia

Bringing together scholars from Russia, the United States and Europe, this collection of essays is the first to explore the slippery phenomenon of post-Soviet nostalgia by studying it as a discursive practice serving a wide variety of ideological agendas. The authors demonstrate how feelings of loss and displacement in post-Soviet Russia are turned into effective tools of state building and national mobilization, as well as into weapons for local resistance and the assertion of individual autonomy. Drawing on novels, memoirs, documentaries, photographs and Soviet commodities, Post-Soviet Nostalgia is an invaluable resource for historians, literary scholars and anthropologists interested in how Russia comes to terms with its Soviet past.

The Soviet Biological Weapons Program

[In] disguised US sabotage. . . saboteurs dispersed the bacteria at Soviet bus stops at night” [presumably released as an aerosol].64 Burgasov astonishingly adopted this new explanation, thus replacing his own earlier explanation that ...

The Soviet Biological Weapons Program

This is the first attempt to understand the full scope of the USSR’s offensive biological weapons research, from inception in the 1920s. Gorbachev tried to end the program, but the U.S. and U.K. never obtained clear evidence that he succeeded, raising the question whether the means for waging biological warfare could be present in Russia today.

The Afterlife of Discarded Objects

... your line at a bus stop built in the shape of a giant octopus. Soviet Bus Stops, by Canadian photographer Christopher Herwig, is a collection of photographs of bus stops from across former Soviet territories, including Kazakhstan, ...

The Afterlife of Discarded Objects

The Afterlife of Discarded Objects: Memory and Forgetting in a Culture of Waste As one of its driving principles, The Afterlife of Discarded Objects: Memory and Forgetting in a Culture of Waste analyzes the double reconstitution of discarded items. In this afterlife, discarded objects might transform from a worthless object into a plaything or a work of art, and then to an artifact marking a specific historical time period. This transformation is represented through various forms of recollection—stories, photographs, collectibles, heirlooms, monuments, and more. Shaped by nostalgia and wishful thinking, discarded objects represent what is wasted, desired, and aestheticized, existing at the intersection of individual and collective consciousness. While The Afterlife of Discarded Objects constitutes a version of revisionist historiography through its engagement with alternative anthropological artifacts, its ambition stretches beyond that to consider how seemingly immaterial phenomena such as memory and identity are embedded in and shaped by material networks, including ephemera. Guruianu and Andrievskikh create a written, visual, and virtual playground where transnational narratives fuse into a discourse on the persistent materiality of ephemera, especially when magnified through narrative and digital embodiment. The Afterlife of Discarded Objects is printed in full color and includes references, an index, and over seventy hi-resolution color images. “The Afterlife of Discarded Objects: Memory and Forgetting in a Culture of Waste uses contemporary theory, literature, popular culture, and personal narratives to investigate how we assign political, socio-cultural, and aesthetic meaning to objects. The book is unique in applying personal narratives and testimonies of contributors from around the world to provide insights and critiques of Western attitudes toward these objects. The Afterlife of Discarded Objects provides transformative social commentary through scrutiny and stories of discarded/found objects in Eastern Europe and in the West encouraging us to reflect more critically on our relationships with things. The stories and theories interwoven in Guruianu and Andrievskikh’s book turn memory into matter and aspire to teach through their exploration. It’s a lofty goal, and the book succeeds.” —Sohui Lee

Soviets in Space

The People of the USSR and the Race to the Moon Colin Turbett ... Houghton Mifflin Heppenheimer, T. (2002) The Space Shuttle Decision 1965–72 Washington, Smithsonian Herwig, C. (2015) Soviet Bus Stops London, Fuel Hill, A. (2017) The ...

Soviets in Space

The victory over Nazi Germany in 1945, in which the Soviet Union played both the greatest part and suffered the greatest losses, found the country in a state of devastation. Military strength could not compensate for the damage wreaked by war, especially in the western areas of the USSR. Within just over ten years, not only was Stalin dead and the relative freedoms of the Khrushchev 'Thaw' in progress, but the Soviet Union was ahead in the Space Race – beating the enormous wealth and resources of the USA, launching Soviet citizens from ordinary backgrounds quite literally into worlds beyond our own. The communist dream seemed alive and well. The story of those years has rarely been told from a Soviet perspective: Cold War journalism and historical accounts written in the West tend to portray the space race in terms of ideological competition - with success and failure mirroring power and influence in a world divided between capitalism and communism. Whilst the military on both sides certainly benefited from the cutting edge technological advance of the space programmes, for the people of the USSR the prestige of their successes offered proof that 'real existing socialism' was moving mankind onto new levels of peaceful progress. Agriculture and railway building initiatives tried to involved ordinary people in other pioneering projects to build socialism before the dream shattered in the 1980s. Extensively illustrated with images from the time, this book looks at the years of Soviet space success, their background, the personalities involved, and their impact on the ordinary people of the USSR.

Beyond Market Dystopia New Ways of Living

... bestsellers such as Frederic Chaubin's CCCP: Cosmic Communist Constructions Photographed (2011), Rebecca Litchfield's Soviet Ghosts (2013), and Christopher Herwig's Soviet Bus Stops (two volumes – 2015 and 2018), among others.

Beyond Market Dystopia  New Ways of Living

Essays which aim to create a world of agency and justice. How can we build a future with better health and homes, respecting people and the environment? The 2020 edition of the Socialist Register, Beyond Market Dystopia, contains a wealth of incisive essays that entice readers to do just that: to wake up to the cynical, implicitly market-driven concept of human society we have come to accept as everyday reality. Intellectuals and activists such as Michelle Chin, Nancy Fraser, Arun Gupta, and Jeremy Brecher connect with and go beyond classical socialist themes, to combine an analysis of how we are living now with visions and plans for new strategic, programmatic, manifesto-oriented alternative ways of living.

Rethinking Utopia

stop, Siberia! The Strange and Beautiful world of Soviet bus stops« (8,530 shares, The Guardian, 2015);. aThe. Wild Architecture of Soviet-Era Bus Stops« (1,944 Facebook shares, Wired, 2015); ...

Rethinking Utopia

Over five hundred years since it was named, utopia remains a vital concept for understanding and challenging the world(s) we inhabit, even in – or rather because of – the condition of ‘post-utopianism’ that supposedly permeates them. In Rethinking Utopia David M. Bell offers a diagnosis of the present through the lens of utopia and then, by rethinking the concept through engagement with utopian studies, a variety of ‘radical’ theories and the need for decolonizing praxis, shows how utopianism might work within, against and beyond that which exists in order to provide us with hope for a better future. He proposes paying a ‘subversive fidelity’ to utopia, in which its three constituent terms: ‘good’ (eu), ‘place’ (topos), and ‘no’ (ou) are rethought to assert the importance of immanent, affective relations. The volume engages with a variety of practices and forms to articulate such a utopianism, including popular education/critical pedagogy; musical improvisation; and utopian literature. The problems as well as the possibilities of this utopianism are explored, although the problems are often revealed to be possibilities, provided they are subject to material challenge. Rethinking Utopia offers a way of thinking about (and perhaps realising) utopia that helps overcome some of the binary oppositions structuring much thinking about the topic. It allows utopia to be thought in terms of place and process; affirmation and negation; and the real and the not-yet. It engages with the spatial and affective turns in the social sciences without ever uncritically being subsumed by them; and seeks to make connections to indigenous cosmologies. It is a cautious, careful, critical work punctuated by both pessimism and hope; and a refusal to accept the finality of this or any world.

Soviet Seasons

In 'Soviet Seasons' Kotov's photographs reveal unfamiliar aspects of the post-Soviet terrain.

Soviet Seasons

The post-Soviet republics seen over four different seasons, by acclaimed Russian photographer, Instagram sensation and Soviet Cities author Arseniy Kotov In Soviet Seasons, Arseniy Kotov reveals unfamiliar aspects of the post-Soviet terrain in sublime photographs. From snow-blanketed Siberia in winter to the mountains of the Caucasus in summer, these images show how a once powerful, utopian landscape has been affected by the weight of nature itself. This uniquely broad perspective could only be achieved by a photographer such as Kotov. Singularly dedicated to exploring every corner of his country, Kotov often hitchhikes across vast distances. On these journeys he chronicles not only the architectural achievements of the Soviet empire, but also its overlooked or simply undocumented constructions. He writes: "In this book I want to show how beautiful and diverse the cities and nature of this vast region are at different times of the year. I have traveled widely across Russia and its neighboring countries, where I captured the landscape of post-Soviet cities and witnessed the seasonal changes."

Transport Systems of Russian Cities

Privately owned companies emerged on the Russian bus and minibus markets after the reforms of Russian economy in the early ... A public company usually serves around 30–40 routes while an average private company serves 2 or 3 routes.

Transport Systems of Russian Cities

This volume discusses post-socialist urban transport functioning and development in Russia, within the context of the country’s recent transition towards a market economy. Over the past twenty-five years, urban transport in Russia has undergone serious transformations, prompted by the transitioning economy. Yet, the lack of readily available statistical data has led to a gap in the inclusion of Russia in the body of international transport economics research. By including ten chapters of original, cutting-edge research by Russian transport scholars, this book will close that gap. Discussing topics such as the relationship between urban spatial structure and travel behavior in post-soviet cities, road safety, trends and reforms in urban public transport development, transport planning and modelling, and the role of institutions in post-soviet transportation management, this book provides a comprehensive survey of the current state of transportation in Russia. The book concludes with a forecast for future travel development in Russia and makes recommendations for future policy. This book will be of interest to researchers in transportation economics and policy as well as policy makers and those working in the field of urban and transport planning.

Pedro and Ricky Come Again

Soviet Bus Stops by Christopher Herwig very name If we are to judge by the architectural archaeology of its final years, the Soviet Union seems to have been more an expression of hope than a reflection of the actuality.

Pedro and Ricky Come Again

This landmark publication collects three decades of writing from one of the most original, provocative and consistently entertaining voices of our time. Anyone who cares about language and culture should have this book in their life. Thirty years ago, Jonathan Meades published a volume of reportorial journalism, essays, criticism, squibs and fictions called Peter Knows What Dick Likes. The critic James Wood was moved to write: ‘When journalism is like this, journalism and literature become one.’ Pedro and Ricky Come Again is every bit as rich and catholic as its predecessor. It is bigger, darker, funnier, and just as impervious to taste and manners. It bristles with wit and pin-sharp eloquence, whether Meades is contemplating northernness in a German forest or hymning the virtues of slang. From the indefensibility of nationalism and the ubiquitous abuse of the word ‘iconic’, to John Lennon’s shopping lists and the wine they call Black Tower, the work assembled here demonstrates Meades's unparalleled range and erudition, with pieces on cities, artists, sex, England, concrete, politics and much, much more.

From German K nigsberg to Soviet Kaliningrad

The tour also offered a revised account of the Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic's relationship to the ... The second, 'On the Historical and Memorable Places of Kaliningrad' – split into both walking and bus routes – sought to ...

From German K  nigsberg to Soviet Kaliningrad

This book explores how the Soviet Union, after capturing and annexing the German East Prussian city of Königsberg in 1945 and renaming it Kaliningrad, worked to transform the city into a model of Soviet modernity. It examines how the Soviets expelled all the remaining German people, repopulated the city and region with settlers from elsewhere in the Soviet Union, destroyed the key remaining German buildings and began building a model Soviet city, a physical manifestation of the societal transformation brought about by communism. However, the book goes on to show that over time many of the model Soviet buildings were uncompleted and that the citizens, aware of their Polish and Lithuanian neighbours to both the east and the west and appreciating their place in the wider Baltic region, came to view themselves as something different from other Soviet and Russian citizens. The book concludes by assessing present developments as the people of Kaliningrad are increasingly rediscovering the city’s pre-Soviet past and forging a new identity for themselves on their own terms.

Repair Brokenness Breakthrough

and author of the book Soviet Bus Stops in Georgia, takes the geological fissures of Tbilisi as a link between body and politics: In the dark 1990s, as we call it, we kids literally used to play in street holes and damaged ...

Repair  Brokenness  Breakthrough

Exploring some of the ways in which repair practices and perceptions of brokenness vary culturally, Repair, Brokenness, Breakthrough argues that repair is both a process and also a consequence which is sought out—an attempt to extend the life of things as well as an answer to failures, gaps, wrongdoings, and leftovers. This volume develops an open-ended combination of empirical and theoretical questions including: What does it mean to claim that something is broken? At what point is something broken repairable? What are the social relationships that take place around repair? And how much tolerance for failure do our societies have?

Packing Up

Rovshan took us to tea with some friends of his who served huge platters of baklava, and the good part was that you couldn't refuse or it would have been an insult. On the way home we photographed bus stops. Soviet bus stops tend to be ...

Packing Up

Brigid Keenan was a successful young London fashion journalist when she fell in love with a diplomat and left behind the gilt chairs of the Paris salons for a large chicken shed in Nepal. Her bestselling account of life as a 'trailing spouse', Diplomatic Baggage, won the hearts of thousands in countries all over the world. Now, in her further adventures, we find Brigid in Kazakhstan, where AW, her husband, contracts Lyme disease from a tick, the local delicacy is horse meat sausage and Brigid's visit to a market leads to a full-scale riot from which she requires a police escort. Then, as the prospect retirement looms, Brigid finds herself on the cusp of a whole new world: shuttling between London, Brussels and their last posting in Azerbaijan, navigating her daughters' weddings while coping with a cancer diagnosis, and getting a crash course in grand-motherhood as she helps organise a literature festival in Palestine. Along the way, dauntless and wildly funny as ever, Brigid learns that packing up doesn't mean packing in as she discovers that retiring and moving back home could just be her biggest challenge yet.

Soviet Union

Safety Section Stops Trains Automatically , R - 21 TRANSLATIONS ON SOVIET TRANSPORTATION P. 64 . 23,053 ( card 6 ) JPRS 23,053 ... Airline Bus Terminal Built at Tbilisi , TRANSLATIONS ON SOVIET TRANSPORTATION , No. 59 , d + 125 pp .

Soviet Union


Second World Postmodernisms

... 2011); Christopher Herwig, Soviet Bus Stops (London: Fuel, 2015); Jan Kempenaers, Spomenik (Amsterdam: Roma Publication, 2010); Armin Linke and Srđan Jovanović Weiss, Socialist Architecture: The Vanishing Act (Zurich: JRP-Ringier, ...

Second World Postmodernisms

If postmodernism is indeed 'the cultural logic of late capitalism', why did typical postmodernist themes like ornament, colour, history and identity find their application in the architecture of the socialist Second World? How do we explain the retreat into paper architecture and theoretical discussion in societies still nominally devoted to socialist modernization? Exploring the intersection of two areas of growing scholarly interest - postmodernism and the architecture of the former socialist world - this edited collection stakes out new ground in charting architecture's various transformations in the 1970s and 80s. Fourteen essays together explore the question of whether or not architectural postmodernism had a specific Second World variant. The collection demonstrates both the unique nature of Second World architectural phenomena and also assesses connections with western postmodernism. The case studies cover the vast geographical scope from Eastern Europe to China and Cuba. They address a wealth of aesthetic, discursive and practical phenomena, interpreting them in the broader socio-political context of the last decades of the Cold War. The result provides a greatly expanded map of recent architectural history, which redefines postmodernist architecture in a more theoretically comprehensive and global way.

Soviet American

Next month at my birthday, (as usually) I was gettogether in Russian restaurant, with many of my friends, who came with their girlfriends and wife's. ... She happened to live in my neighborhood, and I saw her on bus stops.

Soviet American

This is a book of the last century of the world. Or a book of life, about us, the people of the world and each individual. Or a book of answers that people do not always obey. From the past to present to the future. Family, parents, children, life, wife. Respect. Our past, our countries, our choices, our freedom. With total connection, with ideology, view, and mentality of our ancestors. Include our American founding fathers, Words, views, and hobbies. This book was born in an old-fashioned barbershop, made by an old-school Soviet barber. It has been offered to read to real-life customers on the spot while they were waiting for the best haircuts. From simple realities of small business owners and realities in old-fashioned barbershops, to simple realities and history of the country to around the world. Included is the Soviet barber's life story and roads to freedom, where American people will see their history, or real history, and reality of their ancestors who made tough decisions and choices and dangerous roads, to freedom and independence. It is based on conversations between the customers and the barber.

Everyday Belonging in the Post Soviet Borderlands

However, exploring further we notice how all advertisements and street names are written in two languages and all bus stops are announced first in Kazakh and then in Russian. At the main pedestrian street, Konstitutsiya, ...

Everyday Belonging in the Post Soviet Borderlands

This book is a comprehensive ethnography of everyday belonging among Russian speakers in Estonia and Kazakhstan.

What is Soviet Now

... also in Perm oblast, describes: The bus from Perm is comfortable with TV and video and costs 150 rubles one way. It takes about three to three and one-quarter hours. The bus stops on the ZD\ DW WKH VHWWOHPHQW RI &KHOYD ZKHUH \RX ...

What is Soviet Now

Economists and political scientists wrestle with the challenges faced by Russian officials and public alike in adapting to a market economy and democracy, including the fragility of property rights and elections still rooted in old institutional structures. This book examines the reforms of health and welfare, and the hierarchy of privilege and access, and consider how Putin's statist approach to mythmaking compares to that of previous Soviet and post-Soviet regimes. Historians and anthropologists explore the issue of nostalgia, gender, punishment, belief, and how history itself is being created and perceived today. The book concludes with a journey through the ruined landscape of real socialism.