Space and Place in the Mexican Landscape

In this volume, the authors consider the ideas and views that give the constructed spaces and buildings of Mexico—especially, of Querétaro—their particular ambience.

Space and Place in the Mexican Landscape

Metaphysical conceptions have always influenced how human societies create the built environment. Mexico—with its rich culture, full of symbol and myth, its beautiful cities, and its evocative ruins—is an excellent place to study the interplay of influences on space and place. In this volume, the authors consider the ideas and views that give the constructed spaces and buildings of Mexico—especially, of Querétaro—their particular ambience. They explore the ways the built world helps people find meaning and establish order for their earthly existence by mirroring their metaphysical assumptions, and they guide readers through time to see how the transformation of worldviews affects the urban evolution of a Mexican city. The authors, then, construct a “metaphysical archeology” of space and place in the built landscape of Mexico. In the process, they identify the intangible, spiritual aspects of this land. Not only scholars of architecture, but also archeologists and anthropologists—particularly those interested in Mexican backgrounds and culture—will appreciate the authors’ approach and conclusions.

Hispanic Spaces Latino Places

"Mexican American Exterior Murals." Geographical Review 74 (4): 409-424. . 1988. "Mexican American Housescapes." Geographical Review 78 (3): 299-315. . 1995. "Urban Ethnic Landscape Identity." Geographical Review 85 (4): 518- 534- .

Hispanic Spaces  Latino Places

Hispanics/Latinos are the largest ethnic minority in the United States—but they are far from being a homogenous group. Mexican Americans in the Southwest have roots that extend back four centuries, while Dominicans and Salvadorans are very recent immigrants. Cuban Americans in South Florida have very different occupational achievements, employment levels, and income from immigrant Guatemalans who work in the poultry industry in Virginia. In fact, the only characteristic shared by all Hispanics/Latinos in the United States is birth or ancestry in a Spanish-speaking country. In this book, sixteen geographers and two sociologists map the regional and cultural diversity of the Hispanic/Latino population of the United States. They report on Hispanic communities in all sections of the country, showing how factors such as people's country/culture of origin, length of time in the United States, and relations with non-Hispanic society have interacted to create a wide variety of Hispanic communities. Identifying larger trends, they also discuss the common characteristics of three types of Hispanic communities—those that have always been predominantly Hispanic, those that have become Anglo-dominated, and those in which Hispanics are just becoming a significant portion of the population.

Encuentro de espacios

Encuentro de espacios


Mapping Colonial Spanish America

In this way , Cervantes de Salazar aspires to capture the whole economic basis of the colonial system , which is contained in this part of the Mexican landscape . The rural space is placed in contrast to the urban one previously ...

Mapping Colonial Spanish America

The essays inquire into the spatial configurations of colonial Spanish America and its inhabitants as they both relate to isues of alterity, identity, the economy of geographical representation, gender, and the construction of the colonial city. The volume indicated a variety of essays dealing with different geographical regions, including the centers of cultural production (such as Mexico and Peru) as well as marginalized colonial territories.

The Church of the Dead

18 Letter from Moya de Contreras to the King, AGI, México 336A, Cartas y expedientes de los arzobispos de México 1539–1602, 16 de diciembre de 1578. ... 27 Nunez, Arvizu, and Abonce, Space and Place in the Mexican Landscape, 32.

The Church of the Dead

Tells the story of the founding of American Christianity against the backdrop of devastating disease, and of the Indigenous survivors who kept the nascent faith alive Many scholars have come to think of the European Christian mission to the Americas as an inevitable success. But in its early period it was very much on the brink of failure. In 1576, Indigenous Mexican communities suffered a catastrophic epidemic that took almost two million lives and simultaneously left the colonial church in ruins. In the crisis and its immediate aftermath, Spanish missionaries and surviving pueblos de indios held radically different visions for the future of Christianity in the Americas. The Church of the Dead offers a counter-history of American Christian origins. It centers the power of Indigenous Mexicans, showing how their Catholic faith remained intact even in the face of the faltering religious fervor of Spanish missionaries. While the Europeans grappled with their failure to stem the tide of death, succumbing to despair, Indigenous survivors worked to reconstruct the church. They reasserted ancestral territories as sovereign, with Indigenous Catholic states rivaling the jurisdiction of the diocese and the power of friars and bishops. Christianity in the Americas today is thus not the creation of missionaries, but rather of Indigenous Catholic survivors of the colonial mortandad, the founding condition of American Christianity. Weaving together archival study, visual culture, church history, theology, and the history of medicine, Jennifer Scheper Hughes provides us with a fascinating reexamination of North American religious history that is at once groundbreaking and lyrical.

Gender and the Negotiation of Daily Life in Mexico 1750 1856

“The Interaction of Space and Place: The Mexican Mixture.” In Space and Place in the Mexican Landscape. The Evolution of a Colonial City, edited by Malcolm Quantrill, 1–73. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2001.

Gender and the Negotiation of Daily Life in Mexico  1750 1856

History is not just about great personalities, wars, and revolutions; it is also about the subtle aspects of more ordinary matters. On a day-to-day basis the aspects of life that most preoccupied people in late eighteenth- through mid nineteenth-century Mexico were not the political machinations of generals or politicians but whether they themselves could make a living, whether others accorded them the respect they deserved, whether they were safe from an abusive husband, whether their wives and children would obey them?in short, the minutiae of daily life. Sonya Lipsett-Rivera?s Gender and the Negotiation of Daily Life in Mexico, 1750?1856 explores the relationships between Mexicans, their environment, and one another, as well as their negotiation of the cultural values of everyday life. By examining the value systems that governed Mexican thinking of the period, Lipsett-Rivera examines the ephemeral daily experiences and interactions of the people and illuminates how gender and honor systems governed these quotidian negotiations. Bodies and the built environment were inscribed with cultural values, and the relationship of Mexicans to and between space and bodies determined the way ordinary people acted out their culture.

Tourism and Indigenous Heritage in Latin America

As Observed through Mexico's Magical Village Cuetzalan Casper Jacobsen ... Mexico City: El Colegio de México. ... Pp. 1–73 in Space and Place in the Mexican Landscape: The Evolution of a Colonial City, edited by M. Quantrill.

Tourism and Indigenous Heritage in Latin America

Following the surge of regional multiculturalism and indigenous political mobilization, how are indigenous Latin Americans governed today? Addressing the Mexican flagship tourist initiative of ‘Magical Villages,’ this book shows how government tourism programs do more than craft appealing tourist experiences from ideas of indigeneity, tradition, and heritage. Rather, heritage-centered tourism and multiculturalism are fusing into a strategy of government set to tame and steer indigenous spaces of negotiation by offering alternative multicultural national self-images, which trigger new modes of national belonging and participation, without challenging structural political and social asymmetries. By examining contemporary Mexican tourism policies and multiculturalist ideals through policy analysis and ethnographic research in a mestizo municipalcapital in a majority indigenous Nahua municipality, this book shows how mestizo nationalism is regenerated in tourism as part of a neoliberal governmentality framework. The book demonstrates how tourism initiatives that center on indigenous cultural heritage and recognition do not self-evidently empower indigenous citizens, and may pave the way for extracting indigenous heritage as a national resource to the benefit of local elites and tourist visitors. This work is of key interest to researchers, advanced students, and critically engaged practitioners in the fields of Latin American studies, indigenous studies, social anthropology, critical heritage studies, and tourism.

Landscape and Englishness

The real of place is also in the “spirit of place”. Lawrence locates native individuals in their cultural space, which then, like the Mexican landscape, is represented as a psychic condition; or the bush in Australia as biding its time ...

Landscape and Englishness

In the papers collected in this, the first volume of the Spatial Practices series, Englishness is reflected in the spaces it occupies or dwells in. Broadly influenced by a renewed and growing interest in questions of cultural identity, its emergence in Victorian theories and fictions of nationality, and the new cultural geography, the papers cover a rich variety of spaces and places which have been appropriated for cultural meanings: the rural countryside and farmland of the Home Counties in the early nineteenth century as Arcadian idyll in Cobbett, as the land to die for in war propaganda, and as nostalgia for a unified, organic English culture in Lawrence, Morton and Priestley's travel writing, but also in the Shell Tourist Guides to motoring in rural England; English moorland; the sacred geographies of monuments in Hardy and others; the traditional seaside deconstructed in Martin Parr's photography, and the sea as English Victorian imperial territory and its symbolic breezes in Froude's travel writing. The English landscape is also a paradigm for the description of other places in D. H. Lawrence's travel writing or for the colonial territory itself in Rushdie's writing India, a displacement of other landscapes. This collection of papers examines the assumption that constructions of rural England provide the basis for an understanding of Englishness.

Small City on a Big Couch

Mexican Studies/Estudios Mexicanos, 18, 61–100. Nuñez, F., Arvizu, C., & Abonce, R. (2007). Space and Place in the Mexican Landscape: The Evolution of a Colonial City. College Station: Texas A & M University Press. Nuttini, H. (2004).

Small City on a Big Couch

This book psychoanalyzes a small Mexican city to figure out how the city makes sense of both herself and her many Others in the face of constant change. It puts the city on the couch and works through her past and present relationships, analyzing issues surrounding sexuality, the compulsion to repeat, transferences and desires.

In the Shadow of Cort s

Matos Moctezuma and Carrasco, Moctezuma's Mexico. 24. ... Jacobo Romero, cited in Chorba, Mexico, from Mestizo to Multicultural, ... J. Lara, City, Temple, Stage; Núñez, Arvizu, and Abonce, Space and Place in the Mexican Landscape. 41.

In the Shadow of Cort  s

"The book proposes a visual and cultural history of the legacy of the contact between Spaniards and indigenous societies of Mexico by following the route of Hernaan Cortaes and by conducting personal interviews with ordinary Mexican people along these territories once crossed by the army of Spaniards"--Provided by publisher.

From Aztec to High Tech

Architecture and Landscape Across the Mexico-United States Border Lawrence A. Herzog ... The Crisis of Urban Space and Place in North America A compelling feature of Mexican urbanism lies in its deep - rootedness to design traditions ...

From Aztec to High Tech

After reviewing three key period in Mexico's three-thousand-year-old architectural past -indigenous, Spanish colonial, and modern- urban planning scholar Herzog focuses on the border territories of northern Mexico and southwestern United States, particularly in California. He explores the architectural future of interdependent neighbors who share a history, an economy and a landscape.

The Oxford Handbook of Latin American History

Esteban Sánchez de Tagle, Los dueños de la calle: una historia de la vía pública en la época colonial (Mexico City: INAH, ... Fernando Núñez, Carlos Arvizu, and Ramón Abonce, Space and Place in the Mexican Landscape: The Evolution of a ...

The Oxford Handbook of Latin American History

This Oxford Handbook comprehensively examines the field of Latin American history.

Traveling from New Spain to Mexico

general and regional maps with the indigenous spaces and historical chronology. ... The mobile and circulating reproductions of Mexican landscape and archaeological sites coalesce into a panoramic display of Mexico as place and history.

Traveling from New Spain to Mexico

How colonial mapping traditions were combined with practices of nineteenth-century visual culture in the first maps of independent Mexico, particularly in those created by the respected cartographer Antonio Garc&ía Cubas.

Space and Place in Children s Literature 1789 to the Present

These include the history, art, and culture of the place and its peoples, and the structures that humans have built up and torn down as much as the landscapes that they have altered or allowed to run wild. Children's literature set in ...

Space and Place in Children   s Literature  1789 to the Present

Focusing on questions of space and locale in children’s literature, this collection explores how metaphorical and physical space can create landscapes of power, knowledge, and identity in texts from the early nineteenth century to the present. The collection is comprised of four sections that take up the space between children and adults, the representation of 'real world' places, fantasy travel and locales, and the physical space of the children’s book-as-object. In their essays, the contributors analyze works from a range of sources and traditions by authors such as Sylvia Plath, Maria Edgeworth, Gloria Anzaldúa, Jenny Robson, C.S. Lewis, Elizabeth Knox, and Claude Ponti. While maintaining a focus on how location and spatiality aid in defining the child’s relationship to the world, the essays also address themes of borders, displacement, diaspora, exile, fantasy, gender, history, home-leaving and homecoming, hybridity, mapping, and metatextuality. With an epilogue by Philip Pullman in which he discusses his own relationship to image and locale, this collection is also a valuable resource for understanding the work of this celebrated author of children’s literature.

Spanish Spaces

Landscape, Space and Place in Contemporary Spanish Culture Ann Davies. — (2008). 'The Politics of Memory in Contemporary Spain', ... 'A Mexican Nouvelle Vague: The Logic of New Waves Under Globalization', Cinema Journal, 47/1: 70–92.

Spanish Spaces

Contemporary cultural geography and contemporary Spanish culture are married in this pioneering study of space and place. Spain's varied terrain—with complex negotiations between the rural, urban, and coastal—offers an ideal setting in which to explore questions of landscape, space, and place. In Spanish Spaces, Ann Davies draws on contemporary Spanish film and literature to explore Spain's sophisticated sense of its geographical and spatial self.

21st Century Geography

Mapping the invisible landscape: Folklore, writing, and the sense of place. ... Space and place: The perspective of experience. ... Dangerous journeys: Mexico City college students and the Mexican landscape, 1954-1962.

21st Century Geography

This is a theoretical and practical guide on how to undertake and navigate advanced research in the arts, humanities and social sciences.

Contemporary Ethnic Geographies in America

Arthur J. Rubel, Across the Tracks: Mexican-Americans in a Texas City (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1966), 3. ... James R. Curtis, “Barrio Space and Place in Southeast Los Angeles,” in Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: Community and ...

Contemporary Ethnic Geographies in America

Ethnic diversity has marked the United States from its inception, and it is impossible to separate ethnicity from an understanding of the United States as a country and “Americans” as a people. Since the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, the United States has experienced watershed transformations in its social, cultural, and ethnic geographies. Considering the impact of these wide-ranging changes, this unique text examines the experiences of a range of ethnic groups in both historical and contemporary context. It begins by laying out a comprehensive conceptual framework that integrates immigration theory; globalization; transnational community formation; and urban, cultural, and economic geography. The contributors then present a rich set of case studies of the key Latin American, Asian American, and Middle Eastern communities comprising the vast majority of newer immigrants. Each case offers a brief historical overview of the group’s immigration experience and settlement patterns and discusses its contemporary socioeconomic dynamics. All these communities have transformed—and been transformed by—the places in which they have settled. Exploring these changing communities, places, and landscapes, this book offers a nuanced understanding of the evolution of America's contemporary ethnic geographies.

The Mexican Border Cities

The Mexican Border Cities draws on extensive field research to examine eighteen settlements along the 2,000-mile border, ranging from towns of less than 10,000 people to dynamic metropolises of nearly a million.

The Mexican Border Cities

From Matamoros to Tijuana, Mexican border cities have long evoked for their neighbors to the north images of cheap tourist playgrounds and, more recently, industrial satellites of American industry. These sensationalized and simplified perceptions fail to convey the complexity and diversity of urban form and function—and of cultural personality—that characterize these places. The Mexican Border Cities draws on extensive field research to examine eighteen settlements along the 2,000-mile border, ranging from towns of less than 10,000 people to dynamic metropolises of nearly a million. The authors chronicle the cities' growth and compare their urban structure, analyzing them in terms of tourist districts, commercial landscapes, residential areas, and industrial and transportation quarters. Arreola and Curtis contend that, despite their proximity to the United States, the border cities are fundamentally Mexican places, as distinguished by their cultural landscapes, including town plan, land-use pattern, and building fabric. Their study, richly illustrated with over 75 maps and photographs, offers a provocative and insightful interpretation of the geographic anatomy and personality of these fascinating—and rapidly changing—communities.

Minerals Collecting and Value across the US Mexico Border

These two projects—showing a new dimension of U.S.-Mexican space, and showing how in making value people and objects make the ... Lefebvre's insight was that space is not an a priori category or blank stage on which action takes place.

Minerals  Collecting  and Value across the US Mexico Border

Elizabeth Emma Ferry traces the movement of minerals as they circulate from Mexican mines to markets, museums, and private collections on both sides of the US-Mexico border. She describes how and why these byproducts of ore mining come to be valued by people in various walks of life as scientific specimens, religious offerings, works of art, and luxury collectibles. The story of mineral exploration and trade defines a variegated transnational space, shedding new light on the complex relationship between these two countries and on the process of making value itself.