Spaces of Interaction Places for Experience

Places for Experience David Benyon. 101 10.3 CHANGING PLACES 10.4 CONCLUSION In the new hybrid, blended spaces and environments where digital images commingle with real objects the sense of presence will become increasingly ...

Spaces of Interaction  Places for Experience

Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience is a book about Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), interaction design (ID) and user experience (UX) in the age of ubiquitous computing. The book explores interaction and experience through the different spaces that contribute to interaction until it arrives at an understanding of the rich and complex places for experience that will be the focus of the next period for interaction design. The book begins by looking at the multilayered nature of interaction and UX—not just with new technologies, but with technologies that are embedded in the world. People inhabit a medium, or rather many media, which allow them to extend themselves, physically, mentally, and emotionally in many directions. The medium that people inhabit includes physical and semiotic material that combine to create user experiences. People feel more or less present in these media and more or less engaged with the content of the media. From this understanding of people in media, the book explores some philosophical and practical issues about designing interactions. The book journeys through the design of physical space, digital space, information space, conceptual space and social space. It explores concepts of space and place, digital ecologies, information architecture, conceptual blending and technology spaces at work and in the home. It discusses navigation of spaces and how people explore and find their way through environments. Finally the book arrives at the concept of a blended space where the physical and digital are tightly interwoven and people experience the blended space as a whole. The design of blended spaces needs to be driven by an understanding of the correspondences between the physical and the digital, by an understanding of conceptual blending and by the desire to design at a human scale. There is no doubt that HCI and ID are changing. The design of “microinteractions” remains important, but there is a bigger picture to consider. UX is spread across devices, over time and across physical spaces. The commingling of the physical and the digital in blended spaces leads to new social spaces and new conceptual spaces. UX concerns the navigation of these spaces as much as it concerns the design of buttons and screens for apps. By taking a spatial perspective on interaction, the book provides new insights into the evolving nature of interaction design.

Cooperative Design Visualization and Engineering

5 Conclusion This study proposed a composition logic of blended space in which the evolution of experience is possible constantly in terms of the augmented space experience ... Benyon, D.: Spaces of interaction, places for experience.

Cooperative Design  Visualization  and Engineering

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 13th InternationalConference on Cooperative Design, Visualization, and Engineering, CDVE2016, held in Sydney, NSW, Australia, in October 2016. The 42 full papers and 9 short papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 89 submissions. The papers cover a broad range of topics in the field of cooperative visualization, visual analytics, cooperative engineering, and cooperative design and applications.

Third Space Information Sharing and Participatory Design

Spaces of interaction, places for experience. In J.M. Carroll (Ed.) Synthesis Lectures on Human-Centered Information. Morgan & Claypool Publishers. DOI: 10.2200/ S00595ED1V01Y201409HCI022. 49 Bergold, J. and Thomas, S. (2012).

Third Space  Information Sharing  and Participatory Design

Society faces many challenges in workplaces, everyday life situations, and education contexts. Within information behavior research, there are often calls to bridge inclusiveness and for greater collaboration, with user-centered design approaches and, more specifically, participatory design practices. Collaboration and participation are essential in addressing contemporary societal challenges, designing creative information objects and processes, as well as developing spaces for learning, and information and research interventions. The intention is to improve access to information and the benefits to be gained from that. This also applies to bridging the digital divide and for embracing artificial intelligence. With regard to research and practices within information behavior, it is crucial to consider that all users should be involved. Many information activities (i.e., activities falling under the umbrella terms of information behavior and information practices) manifest through participation, and thus, methods such as participatory design may help unfold both information behavior and practices as well as the creation of information objects, new models, and theories. Information sharing is one of its core activities. For participatory design with its value set of democratic, inclusive, and open participation towards innovative practices in a diversity of contexts, it is essential to understand how information activities such as sharing manifest itself. For information behavior studies it is essential to deepen understanding of how information sharing manifests in order to improve access to information and the use of information. Third Space is a physical, virtual, cognitive, and conceptual space where participants may negotiate, reflect, and form new knowledge and worldviews working toward creative, practical and applicable solutions, finding innovative, appropriate research methods, interpreting findings, proposing new theories, recommending next steps, and even designing solutions such as new information objects or services. Information sharing in participatory design manifests in tandem with many other information interaction activities and especially information and cognitive processing. Although there are practices of individual information sharing and information encountering, information sharing mostly relates to collaborative information behavior practices, creativity, and collective decision-making. Our purpose with this book is to enable students, researchers, and practitioners within a multi-disciplinary research field, including information studies and Human–Computer Interaction approaches, to gain a deeper understanding of how the core activity of information sharing in participatory design, in which Third Space may be a platform for information interaction, is taking place when using methods utilized in participatory design to address contemporary societal challenges. This could also apply for information behavior studies using participatory design as methodology. We elaborate interpretations of core concepts such as participatory design, Third Space, information sharing, and collaborative information behavior, before discussing participatory design methods and processes in more depth. We also touch on information behavior, information practice, and other important concepts. Third Space, information sharing, and information interaction are discussed in some detail. A framework, with Third Space as a core intersecting zone, platform, and adaptive and creative space to study information sharing and other information behavior and interactions are suggested. As a tool to envision information behavior and suggest future practices, participatory design serves as a set of methods and tools in which new interpretations of the design of information behavior studies and eventually new information objects are being initiated involving multiple stakeholders in future information landscapes. For this purpose, we argue that Third Space can be used as an intersection zone to study information sharing and other information activities, but more importantly it can serve as a Third Space Information Behavior (TSIB) study framework where participatory design methodology and processes are applied to information behavior research studies and applications such as information objects, systems, and services with recognition of the importance of situated awareness.

Human Computer Interaction Design Practice in Contemporary Societies

12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 1. Benyon, D.R.: Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience. Morgan and Claypool Publishers, San Rafael (2014) 2. UrbanIxD: From urban space to future place. Book Sprints for ICT Research (2013) 3.

Human Computer Interaction  Design Practice in Contemporary Societies

The 3 volume-set LNCS 11566, 11567 + 11568 constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Human Computer Interaction thematic area of the 21st International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCII 2019, which took place in Orlando, Florida, USA, in July 2019. A total of 1274 papers and 209 posters have been accepted for publication in the HCII 2019 proceedings from a total of 5029 submissions. The 125 papers included in this HCI 2019 proceedings were organized in topical sections as follows: Part I: design and evaluation methods and tools; redefining the human in HCI; emotional design, Kansei and aesthetics in HCI; and narrative, storytelling, discourse and dialogue. Part II: mobile interaction; facial expressions and emotions recognition; eye-gaze, gesture and motion-based interaction; and interaction in virtual and augmented reality. Part III: design for social challenges; design for culture and entertainment; design for intelligent urban environments; and design and evaluation case studies.

Proxemic Interactions

It encompasses a huge range of issues, theories, technologies, designs, tools, environments and human experiences in ... Shum October 2014 Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience David Benyon September 2014 Mobile Interactions in ...

Proxemic Interactions

In the everyday world, much of what we do as social beings is dictated by how we perceive and manage our interpersonal space. This is called proxemics. At its simplest, people naturally correlate physical distance to social distance. We believe that people’s expectations of proxemics can be exploited in interaction design to mediate their interactions with devices (phones, tablets, computers, appliances, large displays) contained within a small ubiquitous computing ecology. Just as people expect increasing engagement and intimacy as they approach others, so should they naturally expect increasing connectivity and interaction possibilities as they bring themselves and their devices in close proximity to one another. This is called Proxemic Interactions. This book concerns the design of proxemic interactions within such future proxemic-aware ecologies. It imagines a world of devices that have fine-grained knowledge of nearby people and other devices—how they move into range, their precise distance, their identity, and even their orientation—and how such knowledge can be exploited to design interaction techniques. The first part of this book concerns theory. After introducing proxemics, we operationalize proxemics for ubicomp interaction via the Proxemic Interactions framework that designers can use to mediate people’s interactions with digital devices. The framework, in part, identifies five key dimensions of proxemic measures (distance, orientation, movement, identity, and location) to consider when designing proxemic-aware ubicomp systems. The second part of this book applies this theory to practice via three case studies of proxemic-aware systems that react continuously to people’s and devices’ proxemic relationships. The case studies explore the application of proxemics in small-space ubicomp ecologies by considering first person-to-device, then device-to-device, and finally person-to-person and device-to-device proxemic relationships. We also offer a critical perspective on proxemic interactions in the form of “dark patterns,” where knowledge of proxemics may (and likely will) be easily exploited to the detriment of the user.

The Design of Implicit Interactions

... October 2014 Constructing Knowledge Art: An Experiential Perspective on Crafting Participatory Representations Al Selvin and Simon Buckingham Shum October 2014 Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience David Benyon September 2014.

The Design of Implicit Interactions

People rely on implicit interaction in their everyday interactions with one another to exchange queries, offers, responses, and feedback without explicit communication. A look with the eyes, a wave of the hand, the lift of the door handle—small moves can do a lot to enable joint action with elegance and economy. This work puts forward a theory that these implicit patterns of interaction with one another drive our expectations of how we should interact with devices. I introduce the Implicit Interaction Framework as a tool to map out interaction trajectories, and we use these trajectories to better understand the interactions transpiring around us. By analyzing everyday implicit interactions for patterns and tactics, designers of interactive devices can better understand how to design interactions that work or to remedy interactions that fail. This book looks at the “smart,” “automatic,” and “interactive” devices that increasingly permeate our everyday lives—doors, switches, whiteboards—and provides a close reading of how we interact with them. These vignettes add to the growing body of research targeted at teasing out the factors at play in our interactions. I take a look at current research, which indicates that our reactions to interactions are social, even if the entities we are interacting with are not human. These research insights are applied to allow us to refine and improve interactive devices so that they work better in the context of our day-to-day lives. Finally this book looks to the future, and outlines considerations that need to be taken into account in prototyping and validating devices that employ implicit interaction.

Designing for Gesture and Tangible Interaction

Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience David Benyon September 2014 Mobile Interactions in Context: A Designerly Way Toward Digital Ecology Jesper Kjeldskov July 2014 Working Together Apart: Collaboration over the Internet Judith ...

Designing for Gesture and Tangible Interaction

Interactive technology is increasingly integrated with physical objects that do not have a traditional keyboard and mouse style of interaction, and many do not even have a display. These objects require new approaches to interaction design, referred to as post-WIMP (Windows, Icons, Menus, and Pointer) or as embodied interaction design. This book provides an overview of the design opportunities and issues associated with two embodied interaction modalities that allow us to leave the traditional keyboard behind: tangible and gesture interaction. We explore the issues in designing for this new age of interaction by highlighting the significance and contexts for these modalities. We explore the design of tangible interaction with a reconceptualization of the traditional keyboard as a Tangible Keyboard, and the design of interactive three-dimensional (3D) models as Tangible Models. We explore the design of gesture interaction through the design of gesture-base commands for a walk-up-and-use information display, and through the design of a gesture-based dialogue for the willful marionette. We conclude with design principles for tangible and gesture interaction and a call for research on the cognitive effects of these modalities.

Human Computer Interactions in Museums

... Experiential Perspective on Crafting Participatory Representations Al Selvin and Simon Buckingham Shum Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience David Benyon Mobile Interactions in Context: A Designerly Way Toward Digital Ecology ...

Human Computer Interactions in Museums

Museums have been a domain of study and design intervention for Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) for several decades. However, while resources providing overviews on the key issues in the scholarship have been produced in the fields of museum and visitor studies, no such resource as yet existed within HCI. This book fills this gap and covers key issues regarding the study and design of HCIs in museums. Through an on-site focus, the book examines how digital interactive technologies impact and shape galleries, exhibitions, and their visitors. It consolidates the body of work in HCI conducted in the heritage field and integrates it with insights from related fields and from digital heritage practice. Processes of HCI design and evaluation approaches for museums are also discussed. This book draws from the authors' extensive knowledge of case studies as well as from their own work to provide examples, reflections, and illustrations of relevant concepts and problems. This book is designed for students and early career researchers in HCI or Interaction Design, for more seasoned investigators who might approach the museum domain for the first time, and for researchers and practitioners in related fields such as heritage and museum studies or visitor studies. Designers who might wish to understand the HCI perspective on visitor-facing interactive technologies may also find this book useful.

Worth Focused Design Book 2

Constructing Knowledge Art: An Experiential Perspective on Crafting Participatory Representations Al Selvin and Simon Buckingham Shum Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience David Benyon Mobile Interactions in Context: A Designerly ...

Worth Focused Design  Book 2

This book introduces the concept of worth for design teams, relates it to experiences and outcomes, and describes how to focus on worth when researching and expressing design opportunities for generous worth. Truly interdisciplinary teams also need an appropriate common language, which was developed in the companion book Worth-Focused Design, Book 1: Balance, Integration, and Generosity. Its new lexicon for design progressions enables a framework for design and evaluation that works well with a worth focus. Design now has different meanings based upon the approach of different disciplinary practices. For some, it is the creation of value. For others, it is the conception and creation of artefacts. For still others, it is fitting things to people. While each of these design foci has merits, there are risks in not having an appropriate balance across professions that claim the centre of design for their discipline and marginalise others. Generosity is key to the best creative design—delivering unexpected worth beyond documented needs, wants, or pain points. Truly interdisciplinary design must also balance and integrate approaches across several communities of practice, which is made easier by common ground. Worth provides a productive focus for this common ground and is symbiotic with balanced, integrated, and generous (BIG) practices. Practices associated with balance and integration for worth-focused generosity are illustrated in several case studies that have used approaches in this book, complemented them with additional practices.

Data Driven Personas

... Experiential Perspective on Crafting Participatory Representations Al Selvin and Simon Buckingham Shum Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience David Benyon Mobile Interactions in Context: A Designerly Way Toward Digital Ecology ...

Data Driven Personas

Data-driven personas are a significant advancement in the fields of human-centered informatics and human-computer interaction. Data-driven personas enhance user understanding by combining the empathy inherent with personas with the rationality inherent in analytics using computational methods. Via the employment of these computational methods, the data-driven persona method permits the use of large-scale user data, which is a novel advancement in persona creation. A common approach for increasing stakeholder engagement about audiences, customers, or users, persona creation remained relatively unchanged for several decades. However, the availability of digital user data, data science algorithms, and easy access to analytics platforms provide avenues and opportunities to enhance personas from often sketchy representations of user segments to precise, actionable, interactive decision-making tools—data-driven personas! Using the data-driven approach, the persona profile can serve as an interface to a fully functional analytics system that can present user representation at various levels of information granularity for more task-aligned user insights. We trace the techniques that have enabled the development of data-driven personas and then conceptually frame how one can leverage data-driven personas as tools for both empathizing with and understanding of users. Presenting a conceptual framework consisting of (a) persona benefits, (b) analytics benefits, and (c) decision-making outcomes, we illustrate applying this framework via practical use cases in areas of system design, digital marketing, and content creation to demonstrate the application of data-driven personas in practical applied situations. We then present an overview of a fully functional data-driven persona system as an example of multi-level information aggregation needed for decision making about users. We demonstrate that data-driven personas systems can provide critical, empathetic, and user understanding functionalities for anyone needing such insights.

Social Media and Civic Engagement

... Experiential Perspective on Crafting Participatory Representations Al Selvin and Simon Buckingham Shum Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience David Benyon Mobile Interactions in Context: A Designerly Way Toward Digital Ecology ...

Social Media and Civic Engagement

Social media platforms are the latest manifestation in a series of sociotechnical innovations designed to enhance civic engagement, political participation, and global activism. While many researchers started out as optimists about the promise of social media for broadening participation and enhancing civic engagement, recent events have tempered that optimism. As this book goes to press, Facebook is fighting a battle over the massive disclosure of user information during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, social analytics company Cambridge Analytica is being revealed as a major player in micro profiling voters in that same election, bots and fake news factories are undermining democratic discourse via social media worldwide, and the president of the United States is unnerving the world as a stream-of-consciousness Twitter user. This book is a foundational review of current research on social media and civic engagement organized in terms of history, theory, practice, and challenges. History reviews how researchers and developers have continuously pushed the envelope to explore technology enhancements for political and social discourse. Theory reveals that the use of globally-networked social technologies touches many fields including political science, sociology, psychology, media studies, network science, and more. Practice is examined through studies of political engagement both in democratic situations and in confrontational situations. Challenges are identified in order to find ways forward. For better or worse, social media for civic engagement has come of age. Citizens, politicians, and activists are utilizing social media in innovative ways, while bad actors are discovering possibilities for spreading dissension and undermining trust. We are at a sobering inflection point, and this book is your foundation for understanding how we got here and where we are going.

The Trouble With Sharing

... Experiential Perspective on Crafting Participatory Representations Al Selvin and Simon Buckingham Shum Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience David Benyon Mobile Interactions in Context: A Designerly Way Toward Digital Ecology ...

The Trouble With Sharing

Peer-to-peer exchange is a type of sharing that involves the transfer of valued resources, such as goods and services, among members of a local community and/or between parties who have not met before the exchange encounter. It involves online systems that allow strangers to exchange in ways that were previously confined to the realm of kinship and friendship. Through the examples in this book, we encounter attempts to foster the sharing of goods and services in local communities and consider the intricacies of sharing homes temporarily with strangers (also referred to as hospitality exchange or network hospitality). Some of the exchange arrangements discussed involve money while others explicitly ban participants from using it. All rely on digital technologies, but the trickiest challenges have more to do with social interaction than technical features. This book explores what makes peer-to-peer exchange challenging, with an emphasis on reciprocity, closeness, and participation: How should we reciprocate? How might we manage interactions with those we encounter to attain some closeness but not too much? What keeps people from getting involved or draws them into exchange activities that they would rather avoid? This book adds to the growing body of research on exchange platforms and the sharing economy. It provides empirical examples and conceptual grounding for thinking about interpersonal challenges in peer-to-peer exchange and the efforts that are required for exchange arrangements to flourish. It offers inspiration for how we might think and design differently to better understand and support the efforts of those involved in peer-to-peer exchange. While the issues cannot be simply “solved” by technology, it matters which digital tools an exchange arrangement relies on, and even seemingly small design decisions can have a significant impact on what it is like to participate in exchange processes. The technologies that support exchange arrangements—often platforms of some sort—can be driven by differing sets of values and commitments. This book invites students and scholars in the Human–Computer Interaction community, and beyond, to envision and design alternative exchange arrangements and future economies.

An Anthropology of Services

... environments, and human experiences in knowledge work, recreation and leisure activity, teaching and learning, ... Shum October 2014 Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience David Benyon September 2014 Mobile Interactions in ...

An Anthropology of Services

This book explores the possibility for an anthropology of services and outlines a practice approach to designing services. The reader is taken on a journey that Blomberg and Darrah have been on for the better part of a decade from their respective positions helping to establish a services research group within a large global enterprise and an applied anthropology master's program at a Silicon Valley university. They delve into the world of services to understand both how services are being conceptualized today and the possible benefits that might result from taking an anthropological view on services and their design. The authors argue that the anthropological gaze can be useful precisely because it combines attention to details of everyday life with consideration of the larger milieu in which those details make sense. Furthermore, it asks us to reflect upon and assess our own perspectives on that which we hope to understand and change. Central to their exploration is the question of how to conceptualize and engage with the world of services given their heterogeneity, the increasing global importance of the service economy, and the possibilities introduced for an engaged scholarship on service design. While discourse on services and service design can imply something distinctively new, the authors point to parallels with what is known about how humans have engaged with each other and the material world over millennia. Establishing the ubiquity of services as a starting point, the authors go on to consider the limits of design when the boundaries and connections between what can be designed and what can only be performed are complex and deeply mediated. In this regard the authors outline a practice approach to designing that acknowledges that designing involves participating in a social context, that design and use occur in concert, that people populate a world that has been largely built by and with others, and that formal models of services are impoverished representations of human performance. An Anthropology of Services draws attention to the conceptual and methodological messiness of service worlds while providing the reader with strategies for intervening in these worlds for human betterment as complex and challenging as that may be.

Interface for an App

... Experiential Perspective on Crafting Participatory Representations Al Selvin and Simon Buckingham Shum Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience David Benyon Mobile Interactions in Context: A Designerly Way Toward Digital Ecology ...

Interface for an App

This book is an account of how I addressed the need for a smartphone app that would allow someone with Type 1 diabetes to self-manage their condition. Its presentation highlights the major features of the app’s interface design. They include the selection of metaphors appropriate to a user’s need to form a mental model of the app; the importance of visible context; the benefits of consistency; and considerations of a user’s cognitive and perceptual abilities. The latter is a key feature of the book. But the book is also about the design process, and especially about the valuable contributions made by the many focus group meetings in which design ideas were first presented to people with Type 1 diabetes. Their critique, and sometimes their rejection, of interface ideas were crucial to the development of the app. I hope this book will prove useful for teaching and design guidance.

Organizational Implementation

... Experiential Perspective on Crafting Participatory Representations Al Selvin and Simon Buckingham Shum Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience David Benyon Mobile Interactions in Context: A Designerly Way Toward Digital Ecology ...

Organizational Implementation

Information systems are part and parcel of organizations. Yet, organizations often struggle to realize the benefits that motivate their introduction of these systems. To derive benefit from a new information system, it must be integrated into the structures and processes of the organization. That is, the system must be organizationally implemented. This book is about organizational implementation, which requires thorough preparations but also continues long after the system has gone live: (1) During the preparations, the implementation is planned. This phase includes specifying the effects pursued with the system, adapting the system and organization to each other, and obtaining buy-in for the planned change. (2) At go-live, the system is put to operational use and the associated organizational changes take effect. This phase is about insisting on the planned change even though go-live is normally hectic and accompanied by a productivity dip. (3) During continued use after go-live, implementation continues as design in use. This phase is long and improvisational. It includes following up on effects realization, but it is just as much about embracing the opportunities that emerge from using the system. Apart from covering the three phases of organizational implementation, the book inserts implementation in an organizational-change context and discusses barriers to implementation as well as boosters of implementation. The book concludes with an outlook to larger-scale issues beyond the implementation of one system in one organization and with an overview of the competences needed in the implementation team, which runs the organizational implementation.

From Tool to Partner

... Crafting Participatory Representations Al Selvin and Simon Buckingham Shum October 2014 Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience David Benyon September 2014 Mobile Interactions in Context: A Designerly Way Toward Digital Ecology ...

From Tool to Partner

This is the first comprehensive history of human-computer interaction (HCI). Whether you are a user experience professional or an academic researcher, whether you identify with computer science, human factors, information systems, information science, design, or communication, you can discover how your experiences fit into the expanding field of HCI. You can determine where to look for relevant information in other fields—and where you won’t find it. This book describes the different fields that have participated in improving our digital tools. It is organized chronologically, describing major developments across fields in each period. Computer use has changed radically, but many underlying forces are constant. Technology has changed rapidly, human nature very little. An irresistible force meets an immovable object. The exponential rate of technological change gives us little time to react before technology moves on. Patterns and trajectories described in this book provide your best chance to anticipate what could come next. We have reached a turning point. Tools that we built for ourselves to use are increasingly influencing how we use them, in ways that are planned and sometimes unplanned. The book ends with issues worthy of consideration as we explore the new world that we and our digital partners are shaping.

The Paradigm Shift to Multimodality in Contemporary Computer Interfaces

... Crafting Participatory Representations Al Selvin and Simon Buckingham Shum October 2014 Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience David Benyon September 2014 Mobile Interactions in Context: A Designerly Way Toward Digital Ecology ...

The Paradigm Shift to Multimodality in Contemporary Computer Interfaces

During the last decade, cell phones with multimodal interfaces based on combined new media have become the dominant computer interface worldwide. Multimodal interfaces support mobility and expand the expressive power of human input to computers. They have shifted the fulcrum of human-computer interaction much closer to the human. This book explains the foundation of human-centered multimodal interaction and interface design, based on the cognitive and neurosciences, as well as the major benefits of multimodal interfaces for human cognition and performance. It describes the data-intensive methodologies used to envision, prototype, and evaluate new multimodal interfaces. From a system development viewpoint, this book outlines major approaches for multimodal signal processing, fusion, architectures, and techniques for robustly interpreting users' meaning. Multimodal interfaces have been commercialized extensively for field and mobile applications during the last decade. Research also is growing rapidly in areas like multimodal data analytics, affect recognition, accessible interfaces, embedded and robotic interfaces, machine learning and new hybrid processing approaches, and similar topics. The expansion of multimodal interfaces is part of the long-term evolution of more expressively powerful input to computers, a trend that will substantially improve support for human cognition and performance.

Multitasking in the Digital Age

Participatory Representations Al Selvin and Simon Buckingham Shum October 2014 Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience David Benyon September 2014 Mobile Interactions in Context: A Designerly Way Toward Digital Ecology Jesper ...

Multitasking in the Digital Age

In our digital age we can communicate, access, create, and share an abundance of information effortlessly, rapidly, and nearly ubiquitously. The consequence of having so many choices is that they compete for our attention: we continually switch our attention between different types of information while doing different types of tasks--in other words, we multitask. The activity of information workers in particular is characterized by the continual switching of attention throughout the day. In this book, empirical work is presented, based on ethnographic and sensor data collection, which reveals how multitasking affects information workers' activities, mood, and stress in real work environments. Multitasking is discussed from various perspectives: activity switching, interruptions as triggers for activity switching, email as a major source of interruptions, and the converse of distractions: focused attention. All of these factors are components of information work. This book begins by defining multitasking and describing different research approaches used in studying multitasking. It then describes how multiple factors occur to encourage multitasking in the digitally-enabled workplace: the abundance and ease of accessing information, the number of different working spheres, the workplace environment, attentional state, habit, and social norms. Empirical work is presented describing the nature of multitasking, the relationship of different types of interruptions and email with overload and stress, and patterns of attention focus. The final chapter ties these factors together and discusses challenges that information workers in our digital age face.

Representation Inclusion and Innovation

v Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience David Benyon September 2014 Mobile Interactions in Context: A Designerly Way Toward Digital Ecology Jesper Kjeldskov July 2014 Working Together Apart: Collaboration over the Internet Judith ...

Representation  Inclusion  and Innovation

A representation is a thing that can be interpreted as providing information about something: a map, or a graph, for example. This book is about the expanding world of computational representations, representations that use the power of computation to provide information in new forms, and in new ways. Unlike printed maps or graphs, computational representations can be dynamic, and even interactive, so that what is represented, and how, can be shaped by user actions. Exploring these new possibilities can be guided by an emerging theory of representation, that clarifies what characteristics representations must have to express the meaning being represented, and to enable users to discern that meaning easily and accurately. The theory also shows the way to inclusive design, for example using sounds to represent information commonly presented visually, so that people who cannot see can understand what is being presented. Because representations must be shaped by the abilities of their users, and by the nature of the meanings they convey, creating them requires perspectives from multiple disciplines, including psychology, as well as computer science, and the sciences appropriate to the content being expressed. The book presents a series of explorations of this large and complicated space, as invitations to further study, and to innovation.

Contextual Design

Contextual Design: Evolved Karen Holtzblatt and Hugh Beyer October 2014 Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience David Benyon September 2014 Mobile Interactions in Context: A Designerly Way Toward Digital Ecology Jesper Kjeldskov ...

Contextual Design

Contextual Design is a user-centered design process that uses in-depth field research to drive innovative design. Contextual Design was first invented in 1988 and has since been used in a wide variety of industries and taught in universities all over the world. It is a complete front-end design process rooted in Contextual Inquiry, the widespread, industry-standard field data gathering technique. Contextual Design adds techniques to analyze and present user data, drive ideation from data, design specific product solutions, and iterate those solutions with customers. In 2013, we overhauled the method to account for the way that technology has radically changed people’s lives since the invention of the touchscreen phones and other always-on, always-connected, and always-carried devices. This book describes the new Contextual Design, evolved to help teams design for the way technology now fits into peoples’ lives. We briefly describe the steps of the latest version of Contextual Design and show how they create a continual immersion in the world of the user for the purpose of innovative product design. Table of Contents: Introduction / Design for Life / Field Research: Data Collection and Interpretation / Consolidation and Ideation: The Bridge to Design / Detailed Design and Validation / Conclusion / References / Author Biographies