Spatial Information Theory Foundations of Geographic Information Science

Spatial Information Theory: Foundations for Geographic Information Science, Springer Verlag LNCS 2205,189-205 (2001) 6. Ettema, D., Timmermans, H.: Activity Based Approaches to Travel Analysis, Elsevier Science, Amsterdam (1999) 7.

Spatial Information Theory  Foundations of Geographic Information Science

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT 2003, held at Kartause Ittingen, Switzerland, in September 2003. The 26 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 61 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on ontologies of space and time, reasoning about distances and directions, spatial reasoning - shapes and diagrams, computational approaches, reasoning about regions, vagueness, visualization, and landmarks and wayfinding.

Spatial Information Theory Foundations of Geographic Information Science

Toward a Theoretical Framework for Geographic Entity Types. In Frank, A. U., and Campari, I, editors, Spatial Information Theory: A Theoretical Basis for GIS, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences No. 716, pp.

Spatial Information Theory  Foundations of Geographic Information Science

The 5th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT 2001, took place at the Inn at Morro Bay, California, USA, September 19 23, 2001. COSIT grew out of a series of workshops/NATO Advanced Study Institutes/NSF Specialist Meetings during the 1990s concerned with theoretical and applied aspects of representing large scale space, particularly geographic or environmental space (this history is elaborated in the prefaces of previous COSIT proceedings). These are spaces in which (and on which) human action takes place, and which are represented and processed in digital geographic information systems. In these early meetings, the need for well founded theories of spatial information representation and processing was identified, particularly theories based on cognition and on computation. This concern for theory provided an early foundation for the newly emerging field of geographic information science. COSIT is not backed by any particular scientific society but is organized as an independent enterprise. The conference series was established in 1993 as an interdisciplinary biennial European conference on the representation and processing of large scale spatial information after a successful international conference on the topic had been organized by Andrew Frank et al. in Pisa in 1992 (frequently referred to as "COSIT 0"). After two successful European COSIT conferences with strong North American participation (COSIT ’93: Island of Elba, Italy; COSIT ’95: Semmering, Austria), COSIT ’97 moved across the pond to the United States, and was held in the Laurel Highlands, Pennsylvania.

Spatial Information Theory Cognitive and Computational Foundations of Geographic Information Science

The Conference on Spatial Information Theory – COSIT – grew out of a series of workshops / NATO Advanced Study ... and it forms the foundation for the construction of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and for spatial information and ...

Spatial Information Theory  Cognitive and Computational Foundations of Geographic Information Science

The Conference on Spatial Information Theory – COSIT – grew out of a series of workshops / NATO Advanced Study Institutes / NSF specialist meetings concerned with cognitive and applied aspects of representing large-scale space, particularly geographic space. In these meetings, the need for a well-founded theory of spatial information processing was identified. The COSIT conference series was established in 1993 as a biennial interdisciplinary European conference on the representation and processing of information about large-scale space, after a successful international conference on the topic had been organized by Andrew Frank et al. in Pisa, Italy, in 1992 (frequently referred to as ‘COSIT zero’). After two successful European conferences with strong North-American participation (COSIT ’93, held on the Island of Elba, Italy; COSIT ’95, held in Semmering, Austria), the conference became a truly international enterprise when COSIT ’97 was held in the Laurel Highlands, Pennsylvania, USA. COSIT ’99 will take place in Stade, Germany. All aspects of large-scale space, i. e. spaces too large to be seen from a single vantage point, are addressed in the COSIT conferences. These include spaces of geographic scale, as well as smaller spaces in which humans, animals, or autonomous robots have to find their way around. Spatial information theory also deals with the description of objects, processes, or events in spatial environments and it forms the foundation for the construction of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and for spatial information and communication system design in general.

Foundations of Geographic Information Science

connotation, and geographic visualization in land-use debates. In Hirtle, S.C. and Frank, A.U. (Eds), Spatial Information Theory: A Theoretical Basis for GIS, volume 1329 of Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pp. 151-162.

Foundations of Geographic Information Science

As the use of geographical information systems develops apace, a significant strand of research activity is being directed to the fundamental nature of geographic information. This volume contains a collection of essays and discussions on this theme. What is geographic information? What fundamental principles are associated with it? How can

Geographic Information Science

Spatial Information Theory: Cognitive and Computational Foundations of Geographic Information Science, Springer Verlag (1999) 51–64 4. Sorrows, M., Hirtle, S.: The nature of landmarks for real and electronic spaces. In Freksa, C., Mark, ...

Geographic Information Science

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Geographic Information Science, GIScience 2006. The book presents 26 revised full papers. Among traditional topics addressed are spatial representations and data structures, spatial and temporal reasoning, computational geometry, spatial analysis, and databases. Many papers deal with navigation, interoperability, dynamic modeling, ontology, and semantics. Geosensors, location privacy, social issues and GI research networks rank among the new directions covered.

Spatial Information Theory

Bishr, Y.: Overcoming the semantic and other barriers to GIS interoperability. International Journal of Geographical Information Science 12, ... In: Spatial information theory: Foundations of geographic information science, pp. 28–45.

Spatial Information Theory

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT 2007, held in Melbourne, Australia in September 2007. The 27 revised full papers were carefully reviewed from 102 submissions, and they are organized in topical sections on cultural studies, semantics, similarity, mapping and representation, perception and cognition, reasoning and algorithms, navigation and landmarks, as well as uncertainty and imperfection.

Spatial Information Theory

In I. Campari (Ed.), Spatial information theory : a theoretical basis for GIS : European conference, COSIT'93, Marciana Marina, ... In R. G. Golledge (Ed.), Spatial and temporal reasoning in geographic information systems (pp. 85-93).

Spatial Information Theory

This volume contains the papers presented at the "Conference on Spatial Information Theory", held in Ellicottville, New York in September 2005. COSIT 2005 was the 7th International Conference held under the COSIT name.

Geographic Information Systems Concepts Methodologies Tools and Applications

“Simples” paths: Automated route selection for navigation. In W. Kuhn, M. Worboys, & S. Timpf (Eds.), Spatial information theory: Foundations of geographic information science. Conference on Spatial Information Theory (COSIT) 2003. (pp.

Geographic Information Systems  Concepts  Methodologies  Tools  and Applications

Developments in technologies have evolved in a much wider use of technology throughout science, government, and business; resulting in the expansion of geographic information systems. GIS is the academic study and practice of presenting geographical data through a system designed to capture, store, analyze, and manage geographic information. Geographic Information Systems: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications is a collection of knowledge on the latest advancements and research of geographic information systems. This book aims to be useful for academics and practitioners involved in geographical data.

Re Presenting GIS

Galton, A.P., 2001b, A formal theory of objects and fields, In: Spatial Information Theory: Foundations of Geographical Information Science, edited by Montello, D., Lecture Notes in Computer Science 2205, Springer-Verlag, NY, pp.

Re Presenting GIS

'Geographical information science' is not merely a technical subject but also poses theoretical questions on the nature of geographic representation and whether there exist limits on the ability of GI systems to deal with certain objects and issues. This book presents the debate surrounding technical GIS and theory of representation from an 'inside' GIS perspective. Chapters are authored by leading researchers from a range of fields including geographers, planners, ecologists and computer scientists from Europe and North America.

Spatial Cognition IV Reasoning Action Interaction

Renz, J., Qualitative spatial reasoning with topological information, LNAI 2293, Springer, 2002. Montello, D. R., ed., Spatial information theory: Foundations of geographic information science, LNCS 2205, Springer, 2001.

Spatial Cognition IV  Reasoning  Action  Interaction

This is the fourth volume in a series of books dedicated to basic research in spatial cognition. Spatial cognition is a field that investigates the connection between the physical spatial world and the mental world. Philosophers and researchers have p- posed various views concerning the relation between the physical and the mental worlds: Plato considered pure concepts of thought as separate from their physical manifestations while Aristotle considered the physical and the mental realms as two aspects of the same substance. Descartes, a dualist, discussed the interaction between body and soul through an interface organ and thus introduced a functional view that presented a challenge for the natural sciences and the humanities. In modern psych- ogy, the relation between the physical and the cognitive space has been investigated using thorough experiments, and in artificial intelligence we have seen views as diverse as ‘problems can be solved on a representation of the world’ and ‘a representation of the world is not necessary. ’ Today’s spatial cognition work establishes a correspondence between the mental and the physical worlds by studying and exploiting their interaction; it investigates how mental space and spatial “reality” join together in understanding the world and in interacting with it. The physical and representational aspects are equally important in this work. Almost all topics of cognitive science manifest themselves in spatial cognition.

The Handbook of Geographic Information Science

Similarity and distance in information spatializations. ... Santa Barbara, CA National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, pp, 279–81. ... Spatial Information Theory: Foundations of Geographic Information Science.

The Handbook of Geographic Information Science

This Handbook is an essential reference and a guide to the rapidly expanding field of Geographic Information Science. Designed for students and researchers who want an in-depth treatment of the subject, including background information Comprises around 40 substantial essays, each written by a recognized expert in a particular area Covers the full spectrum of research in GIS Surveys the increasing number of applications of GIS Predicts how GIS is likely to evolve in the near future

Spatial Cognition III

Renz, J., Qualitative Spatial Reasoning with Topological Information, LNAI 2293, Springer, Berlin 2002. Montello, D.R., ed., Spatial Information Theory: Foundations of Geographic Information Science, LNCS 2205, Springer, Berlin 2001.

Spatial Cognition III

This third volume documents the results achieved within a priority program on spatial cognition funded by the German Science Foundation (DFG). The 23 revised full papers presented went through two rounds of reviewing and improvement and reflect the increased interdisciplinary cooperation in the area. The papers are organized in topical sections on routes and navigation, human memory and learning, spatial representation, and spatial reasoning.

Handbook of Behavioral and Cognitive Geography

Michon, P.-E. and M. Denis (2001), When and why are visual landmarks used in giving directions?, in D.R. Montello (ed.), Conference on Spatial Information Theory: Foundations of Geographic Information Science, International Conference ...

Handbook of Behavioral and Cognitive Geography

This comprehensive Handbook summarizes existing work and presents new concepts and empirical results from leading scholars in the multidisciplinary field of behavioral and cognitive geography, the study of the human mind, and activity in and concerning space, place, and environment. It provides the broadest and most inclusive coverage of the field so far, including work relevant to human geography, cartography, and geographic information science.

Information Fusion and Geographic Information Systems

Egenhofer MJ, Mark D (2001) Naive geography. In Frank AU, Kuhn W, (eds) Spatial Information Theory: A Theoretical Basis for GIS, vol 988 of Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pp 1–16. Springer, Berlin 2. Jones CB, Alani H, ...

Information Fusion and Geographic Information Systems

This volume contains the papers presented at the International Workshop “Information Fusion and Geographic Information Systems” (IF&GIS’09) held in St. Petersburg, Russia in May 2009. The workshop was organized by the St. Petersburg Institute for Informatics and Automation of the Russian Academy of Sciences (SPIIRAS). The workshop continues a series organised biannually, and attracts academics and industrials from a wide range of disciplines including computer science, geography, statistics, mathematics, hydrography, geomorphology, and environmental sciences. The objective of this workshop is to provide a forum for innovative research oriented towards Geographic Information Science and tech- logies and Corporate Information Systems whose close association highlight novel theoretical and practical challenges. The papers selected by the International Program Committee cover a wide range of innovative areas including ontological and semantic approaches for the representation of geographical data, geographical data monitoring, situation management and forecast, to emerging applications oriented to the maritime environment, disaster management and security threats. While traditional topics of GIS conferences are well represented and still being advanced, several new domains appear and stress the need for the development of versatile monitoring systems and decision making systems. While GIS already have a de facto standard for geographical monitoring and analysis, the papers accepted in this volume also illustrate several novel directions of application whose objective is more closely oriented to process modeling and decision making, and where the nature of the objects represented is revisited using ontological and semantic approaches.

The SAGE Handbook of GIS and Society

Mark, D.M., Skupin, A. and Smith, B. (2001) 'Features, objects, and other things: Ontological distinctions in the geographic domain'. In D.R. Montello (ed.), Spatial Information Theory: Foundations of Geographic Information Science.

The SAGE Handbook of GIS and Society

"The definitive guide to a technology that succeeds or fails depending upon our ability to accommodate societal context and structures. This handbook is lucid, integrative, comprehensive and, above all, prescient in its interpretation of GIS implementation as a societal process." - Paul Longley, University College London "This is truly a handbook - a book you will want to keep on hand for frequent reference and to which GIS professors should direct students entering our field... Selection of a few of the chapters for individual attention is difficult because each one contributes meaningfully to the overall message of this volume. An important collection of articles that will set the tone for the next two decades of discourse and research about GIS and society." - Journal of Geographical Analysis Over the past twenty years research on the evolving relationship between GIS and Society has been expanding into a wide variety of topical areas, becoming in the process an increasingly challenging and multifaceted endeavour. The SAGE Handbook of GIS and Society is a retrospective and prospective overview of GIS and Society research that provides an expansive and critical assessment of work in that field. Emphasizing the theoretical, methodological and substantive diversity within GIS and Society research, the book highlights the distinctiveness and intellectual coherence of the subject as a field of study, while also examining its resonances with and between key themes, and among disciplines ranging from geography and computer science to sociology, anthropology, and the health and environmental sciences. Comprising 27 chapters, often with an international focus, the book is organized into six sections: Foundations of Geographic Information and Society Geographical Information and Modern Life Alternative Representations of Geographic Information and Society Organizations and Institutions Participation and Community Issues Value, Fairness, and Privacy Aimed at academics, researchers, postgraduates, and GIS practitioners, this Handbook will be the basic reference for any inquiry applying GIS to societal issues.

GeoDynamics

In W. Kuhn, M. Worboys, and S. Timpf (Eds.), Spatial Information Theory: Foundations of Geographic Information Science, Proceedings of International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT 2003, Springer, pp. 46–61.

GeoDynamics

While remote sensing gives a surface depiction of the world, its recent convergence with GIS enables richer depictions that can be used to simulate physical processes, identify trends, and make more accurate predictions. GeoDynamics is based on specialized lectures from an international field of experts, addressing remote sensing, spatially distributed modeling of land surface processes, and urban dynamics as part of the GeoComputation conference. It focuses on this symbiotic relationship in a detailed discussion of both remote sensing and spatially distributed dynamic modeling. The book analyzes recent developments in assembling geographical information such as: the ubiquitous deployment of portable measurement devices enabled with global positioning technology and its impact on the field; the management, benefits, and challenges of modeling dynamic processes in three dimensions; the implications of temporal granularity of simulations to predictions; and the appropriate representation of human factors in GIS. It illustrates the importance of incorporating interdisciplinary sciences to hone GIS capabilities, the advantage of sharing data and representations, and effective communication through visualization. This book establishes how these integrated technologies have become a central part of building spatial representations. GeoDynamics is a lasting record of this groundbreaking conference and a valuable contribution to the growing literature on GeoDynamics for academics and practitioners alike.

Applied Spatial Cognition

Behaviour & Information Technology, 14, 239–250. Klippel, A. (2003). Wayfinding choremes. In W Kuhn, M. F. Worboys, S. Timpf (Eds.), Spatial information theory: Foundations of geographic information science, LNCS 2825 (pp. 320–334).

Applied Spatial Cognition

Applied Spatial Cognition illustrates the vital link between research and application in spatial cognition. With an impressive vista ranging from applied research to applications of cognitive technology, this volume presents the work of individuals from a wide range of disciplines and research areas, including psychologists, geographers, information scientists, computer scientists, cognitive scientists, engineers, and architects. Chapters throughout the book are a testimony to the importance of basic and applied research regarding human spatial cognition and behavior in the many facets of daily life. The contents are arranged into three sections, the first of which deals with a variety of spatial problems in real-world settings. The second section focuses on spatial cognition in specific populations. The final part is concerned principally with applications of spatial cognitive research and the development of cognitive technology. Relevant to a number of remarkably diverse groups, Applied Spatial Cognition will be of considerable interest to researchers and professionals in industrial/organizational psychology, human factors research, and cognitive science.

Progress in Location Based Services 2014

In: Spatial Information Theory. Foundations of Geographic Information Science. Springer, Heidelberg, pp 375–389 Frankenstein J, Brüssow S, Ruzzoli F, Hölscher C (2012) The language of landmarks: the role of background knowledge in ...

Progress in Location Based Services 2014

This book presents a general picture of recent research activities related to location-based services. Such activities emerged in the last years especially concerning issues of outdoor/indoor positioning, smart environment, spatial modelling, personalization and context-awareness, cartographic communication, novel user interfaces, crowdsourcing, social media, big data analysis, usability and privacy. This book is comprised of a selection of the best papers presented during the 11th International Symposium on Location Based Services, which was held in Vienna (Austria) between 26th and 28th November 2014.

Visual Information and Information Systems

In S. C. Hirtle & A. U. Frank (Eds.), Spatial information theory: A theoretical basis for GIS (pp. 347-361). Berlin: Springer. Barkowsky, T., Latecki, L. J., & Richter, K.-F. (2000). Schematizing maps: Simplification of geographic shape ...

Visual Information and Information Systems

Comprises 25 revised full papers presented at the 8th International Conference on Visual Information Systems, VISUAL 2005, held in Amsterdam, The Netherlands in July 2005. These represent the current state of the art of visual information processing, feature extraction and aggregation at semantic level and content-based retrieval, as well as the study of user intention in query processing, and issues of delivery and consumption of multimedia content.

Modeling and Using Context

T. Bittner and J. G. Stell . Stratified rough sets and vagueness . In W. Kuhn , M. Worboys , and S. Timpf , editors , Spatial Information Theory : Foundations of Geographic Information Science , pages 270-286 , Berlin , 2003. Springer .

Modeling and Using Context

The Proceedings of the Sixth Congress of the European Association for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Istanbul, June 24-28, 2003. This volume contains details of the 21 symposia and 3 workshops together with the abstracts from the more than 400 contributions submitted and presented in Istanbul.