Spatial Turns

The volume addresses such emerging modes of inquiry by bringing together, for the first time, essays that engage with spatial turns, spatiality, and the theoretical implications of both in the context of German culture, history, and theory.

Spatial Turns

The phrase “spatial turns” signals the growing importance of space as an analytical as well as representational category for culture. The volume addresses such emerging modes of inquiry by bringing together, for the first time, essays that engage with spatial turns, spatiality, and the theoretical implications of both in the context of German culture, history, and theory. Migrating from fields like geography, urban studies, and architecture, the new centrality of space has transformed social-science fields as diverse as sociology, philosophy, and psychology. In cultural studies, productive analyses of space increasingly cut across the studies of literature, film, popular culture, and the visual arts.Spatial Turns brings together essays that apply a spatial analysis to German literature and other media and engages with specifically German theorizations of space by such figures as Siegfried Kracauer and Walter Benjamin.The volume is organized in four sections: “Mapping Spaces” addresses cartography in all forms and in its intersection with culture; “Spaces of the Urban” takes up one of the key sites of spatial studies, the city; “Spaces of Encounter” considers how Germany has become a contact zone for multiple ethnicities; and “Visualized Spaces” concerns the theorization of space in film and new media studies.

Spatial Turns Space Place and Mobility in German Literary and Visual Culture

The volume addresses such emerging modes of inquiry by bringing together, for the first time, essays that engage with spatial turns, spatiality, and the theoretical implications of both in the context of German culture, history, and theory.

Spatial Turns Space  Place and Mobility in German Literary and Visual Culture

The phrase "spatial turns" signals the growing importance of space as an analytical as well as representational category for culture. The volume addresses such emerging modes of inquiry by bringing together, for the first time, essays that engage with spatial turns, spatiality, and the theoretical implications of both in the context of German culture, history, and theory. Migrating from fields like geography, urban studies, and architecture, the new centrality of space has transformed social-science fields as diverse as sociology, philosophy, and psychology. In cultural studies.

Cultural Turns

Spatial. Turn. Recent discussions of the rediscovery of space as a central category in the social sciences and the study of culture presuppose the idea that the concept of space was lost in the first place.

Cultural Turns

The contemporary fields of the study of culture, the humanities and the social sciences are unfolding in a dynamic constellation of cultural turns. This book provides a comprehensive overview of these theoretically and methodologically groundbreaking reorientations. It discusses the value of the new focuses and their analytical categories for the work of a wide range of disciplines. In addition to chapters on the interpretive, performative, reflexive, postcolonial, translational, spatial and iconic turns, it discusses emerging directions of research. Drawing on a wealth of international research, this book maps central topics and approaches in the study of culture and thus provides systematic impetus for changed disciplinary and transdisciplinary research in the humanities and beyond – e.g., in the fields of sociology, economics and the study of religion. This work is the English translation by Adam Blauhut of an influential German book that has now been completely revised. It is a stimulating example of a cross-cultural translation between different theoretical cultures and also the first critical synthesis of cultural turns in the English-speaking world.

What is Theory

It is , however , important to note that several of these turns are related , and I will argue that the spatial turn can be viewed as a condensation of several other turns . There are notable commonalities of interest and methodology ...

What is Theory

There is no consensus in the social and cultural sciences on what theory is, and that is as it should be. A consensus would be outright dangerous for the diversity of intellectual life. The perspectives represented in this volume show that theory can be understood as plot, hope, beholding, doxa, heritage, a stalemate, disappointment, personal matter, or family concept. But, even if theory can be defined in many ways, it cannot be defined in any one way. Beyond disciplinary and epistemological differences, theory has the steadfast characteristic of being what academics work with. More than an epistemological matter, the book's title question is an entry into the dynamics of academic practice. The book consists of a multidisciplinary collection of essays that are tied together by a common effort to tell what theory is. These essays are also paired as dialogues between senior and junior researchers from the same, or allied, disciplines to add a trans-generational dimension to the book's multidisciplinary approach. What Is Theory? has been designed for upper division and graduate students in the social sciences and the humanities, but it will also be of interest to anyone who has felt that the question of what theory is can be more easily asked than answered. Contents include: Why Ask What Theory Is? * The History of the Concept of Theory * History of Ideas at the End of Western Dominance * Looking at Theory in Theory in Science * Theory Has No Big Others in Science and Technology Studies * What Social Science Theory Is and What It Is Not * Theory as Hope * Theory Crisis and the Necessity of Theory - The Dilemmas of Sociology * Theory as Disappointment * Theory - A Personal Matter * Theory - A Professional Matter * Economic Theory - A Critical Realist Perspective * For Theoretical Pluralism in Economic Theory * What Is Theory in Political Science? * For a New Vocabulary of Theory in Political Science * Theorizing the Earth * Spatial Theory as an Interdisciplinary Praxis. *** "This highly original, lively and refreshing book is more than welcome: it is needed....the contributors' insights, passion and diversity fully restore the creative value of theorizing as a way to grasp, understand and more importantly shape the world." - Franck Cochoy, Professor of Sociology, U. of Toulouse

Narrative Turns and Minor Genres in Postmodernism

Postmodernist historical novels reformulate history by countering historical linearity with other , more disjunctive , spatial metaphors . They disrupt linearity much the way cubism disrupted " mimetic " representation in the plastic ...

Narrative Turns and Minor Genres in Postmodernism


Atmospheric Turn in Culture and Tourism

Later, the spatial or topological turn (Harvey, 1973; Latka, 2003; Warf & Arias, 2008) combined interpretivist orientation and cultural lenses with spatial contexts and built environments. While the spatial turn can be conceived as a ...

Atmospheric Turn in Culture and Tourism

Combining ideas of sustainable development, strategic marketing and branding with space design and architecture, this volume offers contemporary perspectives on the development and impact of 'atmospheric quality' in tourism and hospitality service situations. Topics discussed include: silent airports, ambient odours and, co-created atmospheres.

Toward Diversity and Emancipation

On the contrary, particularly in postmodern novels, it is the room created by the events 9 | For a distinction between terminological debates concerning topological, topographical and spatial turns, cf. Günzel, Stephan.

Toward Diversity and Emancipation

This book focuses on the pivotal role which space and spatiality assume in plot and narrative discourse of contemporary U.S.-American literary narratives. Embarking from a new, spatialized approach to cultural history and particularly narrative theory that might also prove useful for neighboring philologies, Marcel Thoene hypothesizes that the canon of novels selected represents a dialectic of simultaneous affirmation and subversion of the American space myth. This results in an integrative and emancipatory function of space reflecting the current dynamic toward a more transcultural, diverse and conflictive post-national U.S.-American society.

Turns of Event

To provide some answers, this chapter approaches the cartographic turn in three steps. ... A genealogy of the cartographic turn has to begin by acknowledging its profound debt to the “spatial turn” of the late 1970s and early 1980s.

Turns of Event

American literary studies has undergone a series of field redefinitions over the past two decades that have been consistently described as "turns," whether transnational, hemispheric, postnational, spatial, temporal, postsecular, aesthetic, or affective. In Turns of Event, Hester Blum and a splendid roster of contributors explore the conditions that have produced such movements. Offering an overview of the state of the study of nineteenth-century American literature, Blum contends that the field's propensity to turn, to reinvent itself constantly without dissolution, is one of its greatest strengths. The essays in the volume's first half, "Provocations," trace the theoretical and methodological development and institutional emergence of certain turns, as well as providing calls to arms. The geopolitically oriented turns toward the transnational, hemispheric, and oceanic (whether Atlantic, Caribbean, Pacific, or archipelagic in focus) have held a certain prevalence in American studies in recent years, and the second half of this volume presents a series of scholarly essays that exemplify these subfields. Taken together, these essays survey the field of American literary studies as it moves beyond new historicism as its primary methodology and evolves in light of ideological, conceptual, and material considerations. There is much at stake in these movements: the consequences and opportunities range from citational and evidentiary practices to canon expansion, resource allocation, and institutional futurity. Contributors: Monique Allewaert, Ralph Bauer, Hester Blum, Martin Brückner, Michelle Burnham, Christopher Castiglia, Sean X. Goudie, Meredith L. McGill, Geoffrey Sanborn.

Time and Transformation in Architecture

Introduction: Time and Spatial and Social Turns in Architectural Research Tuuli Lähdesmäki During the past four ... Among other much discussed scholarly 'turns' in human sciences, the spatial turn has influenced the understanding of ...

Time and Transformation in Architecture

Time and Transformation in Architecture, edited by Tuuli Lähdesmäki, explores architecture and the built environment by emphasizing in its theoretical discussions and empirical analysis the dimensions of time, temporality, and transformation—and their relation to human experiences, behavior, and practices.

Fourierist Communities of Reform

As various spatialturns” have shifted historians' attentions toward the role of demarcated spaces in shaping history, intentional communities have continued to remain in the periphery.41 Their peripheral place in historical memory may ...

Fourierist Communities of Reform

This book explores the intersections between nineteenth-century social reform movements in the United States. Delving into the little-known history of women who joined income-sharing communities during the 1840s, this book uses four community case studies to examine social activism within communal environments. In a period when women faced legal and social restrictions ranging from coverture to slavery, the emergence of residential communities designed by French utopian writer, Charles Fourier, introduced spaces where female leadership and social organization became possible. Communitarian women helped shape the ideological underpinnings of some of the United States’ most enduring and successful reform efforts, including the women’s rights movement, the abolition movement, and the creation of the Republican Party. Dr. Hart argues that these movements were intertwined, with activists influencing multiple organizations within unexpected settings.

Urban Culture

... spatial organization I 128 spatial practices I 79 ; II 48 spatial proximity I 67 spatial routing : classic forms I 320 spatial structure I 125 spatial tactics III 245–7 * spatial and temporal differences : Naples I 321 spatial turns ...

Urban Culture

This set includes key pieces from Peter Ackroyd, Charles Baudelaire, Walter Benjamin, Homi Bhaba, Charles Dickens, Fredrick Engles, Paul Gilroy, Thomas Hobbes, Max Weber, George Simmel, Ian Sinclair, Edward W. Soja, Gayatri Spivak, Nigel Thrift, Virginia Woolf, Sharon Zukin, and many others. The material is arranged thematically highlighting the variety of interests that coexist (and conflict) within the city. Issues such as gender, class, race, age and disability are covered along with urban experiences such as walking, politics & protest, governance, inclusion and exclusion. Urban pathologies, including gangsters, mugging, and drug-dealing are also explored. Selections cover cities from around the globe, including London, Berlin, Paris, New York, Los Angeles, Rio de Janeiro, Bombay and Tokyo. A general introduction by the editor reviews theoretical perspectives and provides a rationale for the collection. This collection offers a valuable research tool to a broad range of disciplines, including: sociology; anthropology; cultural history; cultural geography; art critical theory; visual culture; literary studies; social policy and cultural studies.

Language in a Globalised World

The book merges the ontological and the spatial turns in applied linguistics. These turns have been crucial to developing and permitting new ways of talking about language as well as new grounds for protesting.

Language in a Globalised World


Heimat Space Narrative

... transdisciplinary discourses on space and place?4 In her book Cultural Turns (2006), Doris Bachmann-Medick, scholar of cultural and literary studies at the University of Gießen, devotes a chapter to the spatial turn and embraces its ...

Heimat  Space  Narrative

Explores how contemporary novels dealing with flight and expulsion after the Second World War unsettle traditional notions of Heimat without abandoning place-based notions of belonging.

Health Geographies

... spatial science; spatial turns 'activity‐space' approach, 150, 165 allocation of health care services, 76–77 of care see caregiving, spaces of commercial/retail, 84, 178, 184 contextual explanation for spatial patterning of health, ...

Health Geographies

Health Geographies: A Critical Introduction explores health and biomedical topics from a range of critical geographic perspectives. Building on the field’s past engagement with social theory it extends the focus of health geography into new areas of enquiry. Introduces key topics in health geography through clear and engaging examples and case studies drawn from around the world Incorporates multi-disciplinary perspectives and approaches applied in the field of health geography Identifies both health and biomedical issues as a central area of concern for critically oriented health geographers Features material that is alert to questions of global scale and difference, and sensitive to the political and economic as well sociocultural aspects of health Provides extensive pedagogic materials within the text and guidance for further study

Valuing Landscape in Classical Antiquity

... 'What is the Spatial Turn', http://spatial.scholarslab.org/spatial-turn [consulted Jan. 2016]. Jacob,S.,'Opinion',Dezeenmagazine.http://www.dezeen.com/2014/03/13/opinion-sam -jacob-national-parks-synthesised-nature-and-urbanisation/ ...

Valuing Landscape in Classical Antiquity

Valuing Landscape explores how physical environments affected the cultural imagination of Greco-Roman Antiquity. It demonstrates the values attached to mountains, the underworld, sacred landscapes, and battlefields, and the evaluations of locale connected with migration, exile, and travel.

Human Spatial Memory

Forexample,a cumulativerecord could be thatthe first turn was almost a complete turnaroundto the right, and the second turn was almost a completeturnaround totheleft.Hikers know thispattern ofmovement as a switchback and sailors ...

Human Spatial Memory

The chapters in Human Spatial Memory: Remembering Where present a fascinating picture of an everyday aspect of mental life that is as intriguing to people outside of academia as it is to scientists studying human cognition and behavior. The questions are as old as the study of mind itself: How do we remember where objects are located? How do we remember where we are in relation to other places? What is the origin and developmental course of spatial memory? What neural structures are involved in remembering where? How do we come to understand scaled-down versions of places as symbolic representations of actual places? Although the questions are old, some of the answers-in-progress are new, thanks to some innovative theorizing, solid experimental work, and revealing applications of new technologies, such as virtual environments and brain imaging techniques. This volume includes a variety of theoretical, empirical, and methodological advances that invite readers to make their own novel connections between theory and research. Scholars who study spatial cognition can benefit from examining the latest from well-established experts, as well as milestone contributions from early-career researchers. This combination provides the reader with a sense of past, present, and future in terms of spatial memory research. Just as important, however, is the value of the volume as a touchstone resource for researchers who study perception, memory, or cognition but who are not concerned primarily with the spatial domain. All readers may find the fact that this volume violates the trend toward an ever-narrowing specialization refreshing. Chapters from cognitive psychologists are alongside chapters by developmentalists and neuroscientists; results from field studies are just pages away from those based on fMRI during observation of virtual displays. Thus, the book invites integrative examination across disciplines, research areas, and methodological approaches.

Approaches to Human Geography

However, geohumanities tracks the manifestation of the spatial turn through these multi-faceted engagements. The humanities have long been at risk of treating space, the backdrop to all human behavior and events, as a neutral spatial ...

Approaches to Human Geography

"The book covers some of the (traditionally) most obtuse and difficult-to-grasp philosophical ideas that have influenced geographers/geography. The fact that these are presented in an inclusive and accessible manner is a key strength. Many students have commented that the chapters they have read have encouraged them to read more in this field, which is fantastic from a lecturer's perspective." - Richard White, Sheffield Hallam University A new edition of the classic Approaches text for students, organised in three sections, which overviews and explains the history and philosophy of Human Geographies in all its applications by those who practise it: Section One – Philosophies: Positivist Geography / Humanism / Feminist Geographies / Marxisms / Structuration Theory / Human Animal / Realism / Postmodern Geographies/ Poststructuralist Theories / Actor-Network Theory, / Postcolonialism / Geohumanities / Technologies Section Two – People: Institutions and Cultures / Places and Contexts / Memories and Desires / Understanding Place / Personal and Political / Becoming a Geographer / Movement and Encounter / Spaces and Flows / Places as Thoughts Section Three – Practices: Mapping and Geovisualization / Quantification, Evidence, and Positivism / Geographic Information Systems / Humanism / Activism / Feminist Geographies / Poststructuralist Theories / Psychoanalysis / Environmental Inquiry / Contested Geographies and Culture Wars Fully updated throughout and with eight brand new chapters - this is the core text for modules on history, theory, and practice in Human Geography.

Urban Humanities

The section that follows offers an overview of the spatial, cultural, and global turns and their protagonists. The Spatial Turn: Reasserting the Importance of Space Triggered by the work of French theorists Michel Foucault, ...

Urban Humanities

Original, action-oriented humanist practices for interpreting and intervening in the city: a new methodology at the intersection of the humanities, design, and urban studies. Urban humanities is an emerging field at the intersection of the humanities, urban planning, and design. It offers a new approach not only for understanding cities in a global context but for intervening in them, interpreting their histories, engaging with them in the present, and speculating about their futures. This book introduces both the theory and practice of urban humanities, tracing the evolution of the concept, presenting methods and practices with a wide range of research applications, describing changes in teaching and curricula, and offering case studies of urban humanities practices in the field. Urban humanities views the city through a lens of spatial justice, and its inquiries are centered on the microsettings of everyday life. The book's case studies report on real-world projects in mega-cities in the Pacific Rim—Tokyo, Shanghai, Mexico City, and Los Angeles—with several projects described in detail, including playful spaces for children in car-oriented Mexico City, a commons in a Tokyo neighborhood, and a rolling story-telling box to promote “literary justice” in Los Angeles.

Policy Geophilosophy and Education

We aim to produce different spatial readings to account for the emergence, for example, of a school or a city. While in the twentieth century there had been multiple spatial turns in various disciplines and fields, including linguistics ...

Policy  Geophilosophy and Education

Education policy is premised on its instrumentalist approach. This instrumentalism is based on narrow assumptions concerning people (the subject), decision-making (power), problem-solving (science and methodology), and knowledge (epistemology). Policy, Geophilosophy, and Education reconceptualises the object, and hence, the objectives, of education policy. Specifically, the book illustrates how education policy positions and constitutes objects and subjects through emergent policy arrangements that simultaneously influence how policy is sensed, embodied, and enacted. The book examines the disciplinary and multi-disciplinary approaches to education policy analysis over the last sixty years, and reveals how policy analysis constitutes the ontologies and epistemologies of policy. In order to reconceptualise policy, Policy, Geophilosophy, and Education uses ideas of spatiality, affect and problematization from the disciplines of geography and philosophy. The book problematizes case-vignettes to illustrate the complex and often paradoxical relations between neo-liberal education policy equity, and educational inequalities produced in the representational registers of race and ethnicity.

The Play of Space

(ti dr ̄omen, andres; 974).138 Arriving just in time, Odysseus finishes Neoptolemus' line by turning it back on the young man: “Most villainous of men, what are you doing?” (ti drais; 974).139 The spatial turns of the play keep that ...

The Play of Space

Is "space" a thing, a container, an abstraction, a metaphor, or a social construct? This much is certain: space is part and parcel of the theater, of what it is and how it works. In The Play of Space, noted classicist-director Rush Rehm offers a strikingly original approach to the spatial parameters of Greek tragedy as performed in the open-air theater of Dionysus. Emphasizing the interplay between natural place and fictional setting, between the world visible to the audience and that evoked by individual tragedies, Rehm argues for an ecology of the ancient theater, one that "nests" fifth-century theatrical space within other significant social, political, and religious spaces of Athens. Drawing on the work of James J. Gibson, Kurt Lewin, and Michel Foucault, Rehm crosses a range of disciplines--classics, theater studies, cognitive psychology, archaeology and architectural history, cultural studies, and performance theory--to analyze the phenomenology of space and its transformations in the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. His discussion of Athenian theatrical and spatial practice challenges the contemporary view that space represents a "text" to be read, or constitutes a site of structural dualities (e.g., outside-inside, public-private, nature-culture). Chapters on specific tragedies explore the spatial dynamics of homecoming ("space for returns"); the opposed constraints of exile ("eremetic space" devoid of normal community); the power of bodies in extremis to transform their theatrical environment ("space and the body"); the portrayal of characters on the margin ("space and the other"); and the tragic interactions of space and temporality ("space, time, and memory"). An appendix surveys pre-Socratic thought on space and motion, related ideas of Plato and Aristotle, and, as pertinent, later views on space developed by Newton, Leibniz, Descartes, Kant, and Einstein. Eloquently written and with Greek texts deftly translated, this book yields rich new insights into our oldest surviving drama.