Spectacle in the White City

A splendid tribute to The World's Columbian Exposition, held in Chicago in 1893, this hardcover volume offers a grand photographic record, printed in a sweeping landscape format.

Spectacle in the White City

A splendid tribute to The World's Columbian Exposition, held in Chicago in 1893, this hardcover volume offers a grand photographic record, printed in a sweeping landscape format. Includes essays and captions by a noted historian. 128 photographs.

The Electrifying Fall of Rainbow City Spectacle and Assassination at the 1901 Worlds Fair

It wasn't as though the “White City,” as Chicago's exposition was known, had
gone off perfectly. One of its chief architects had died before the plans had been
fully realized, and the fair had opened unfinished. Then, at the very end of the ...

The Electrifying Fall of Rainbow City  Spectacle and Assassination at the 1901 Worlds Fair

“A marvelous recounting of the 1901 World’s Fair. Every chapter sparkles.… The Buffalo-Niagara Falls extravaganza comes alive in these pages. Highly recommended!” —Douglas Brinkley, author of The Wilderness Warrior The Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, New York, dazzled with its new rainbow-colored electric lights. It showcased an array of wonders, like daredevils attempting to go over Niagara Falls in a barrel, or the “Animal King” putting the smallest woman in the world and also terrifying animals on display. But the thrill-seeking spectators little suspected that an assassin walked the fairgrounds, waiting for President William McKinley to arrive. In Margaret Creighton’s hands, the result is “a persuasive case that the fair was a microcosm of some momentous facets of the United States, good and bad, at the onset of the American Century” (Howard Schneider, Wall Street Journal).

The Cracks in the White City

This study traces the use of spectacle during late nineteenth century American society.

The Cracks in the White City

This study traces the use of spectacle during late nineteenth century American society. My examination of spectacle centers on two widespread models--the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago and the traveling circus. Using these two sites as models of the use of spectacle, I have investigated what objects and people tend to be displayed and how. This project traces how the sites of spectacle of the World's Fair and the circus shaped American perceptions of class, race, and gender.

Zigzag Journeys in the White City

By good fortune no one had been seriously injured ; but the spectacle of
resistless might , presented by this movement of three hundred thousands of
people , will not soon be forgotten by those who witnessed it from the platform .
From here ...

Zigzag Journeys in the White City


The Old North Trail Or Life Legends and Religion of the Blackfeet Indians

CHAPTER XV PAINTED TIPIS The tipi as a dwelling . - Impressive spectacle of
the “ White City ” of the Blackfeet . - Protective designs of tipis . — Their sacred
character and origin . - Strict secrecy of the owners . - I secure an Otter Tipi that
was ...

The Old North Trail  Or  Life  Legends  and Religion of the Blackfeet Indians

In 1886 Walter McClintock went to northwestern Montana as a member of a U.S. Forest Service expedition. He was adopted as a son by Chief Mad Dog, the high priest of the Sun Dance, and spent the next four years living on the Blackfoot Reservation. The Old North Trail, originally published in 1910, is a record of his experiences among the Blackfeet.

The Waste Fix

In historical terms, Waring's simulated city on a hill turns out to imitate rather
faithfully the simulated “White City” erected at ... overcome by an artfully
composed reality: a reality composed, that is, in the mode of theatrical display, of
spectacle.

The Waste Fix

First published in 2002. This book explores the philosophical, social, and aesthetic implications of twentieth-century America's obsession with eliminating waste. Through interdisciplinary engagement with fiction and popular culture, William Little traces the way this obsession finds expression in powerful social forces (e.g., the drive to consume conspicuously; the Progressive-era campaign to manage scientifically; the current demand to "reduce, reuse, recycle"), and shows how such forces are governed by an idealism that links proper treatment of waste with the promise of salvation.

The Bay State Monthly

So many people , it is urged , would pay to witness the spectacle of the
conflagration of the “ White City , " that the receipts would be larger than from the
sale of the iron and lumber piled up by the carpenters . This is incredible ; and
were it not ...

The Bay State Monthly


The Secular Spectacle

southern secularism was not David Duke on the steps of City Hall. At the end of
the twentieth century, it was subtle and silent, not blatant and loudmouthed. Duke
was readily recognizable, a collective symbol of white supremacy. He was not ...

The Secular Spectacle

The manufacturing town of Siler City, North Carolina, was transformed by the arrival of Latino migrants in the 1990s. Using ethnographic and archival sources, Chad E. Seales argues that white Protestants in Siler ritually engaged material cultures of racial segregation and southern industrialization that had been forged in the early twentieth century in order to reclaim public space following the arrival of Latino Catholics. Seales offers a new approach to the study of material religion by considering not just how Protestants use material objects within the bounds of recognizable Christian practice, but also how they use those morally charged material objects to maintain religious order in secular life. In 1901, for example, Confederate Colonel John Randolph Lane led the inaugural Fourth of July parade in downtown Siler City. For southern whites, his bodily performance represented the real presence of Confederate sacrifice for Christian homes. Across the twentieth century,white Protestants publically displayed the moral order embodied by Lane, an order predicated on the racialization of the town's inhabitants, in the annual rites surrounding the Fourth of July parade. At the end of the twentieth century, they renewed the downtown parade in response to Latino Catholics, who had demonstrated their public presence through the ritual performance of the crucifixion of Jesus in a Good Friday procession. Using the contrast between parades and processions, along with other examples, Seales argues that southern whites cultivated their own regional brand of American secularism and used it to claim and regulate public spaces

The New England Magazine

So many people , it is urged , would pay to witness the spectacle of the
conflagration of the “ White City , " that the receipts would be larger than from the
sale of the iron and lumber piled up by the carpenters . This is incredible ; and
were it not ...

The New England Magazine


Spectacles for Young Eyes

ancient city , and the quaint customs ; the Kitai Gorod , or Chinese city , which is
the oldest part of all ; the Beloi Gorod , or white city ” — " And the Smelnoi Gorod ,
” said Peter , " which runs round that like a street . The Beloi Gorod runs round ...

Spectacles for Young Eyes


The White City

... than eventhe Great Fire, certainly if these dozenorso onlookers were to
canvass the city, going from neighborhood to neighborhood, some good might
come of it. ... there's still something inherently scandalous about photographing
death, about a womanin the White City capturing the ... “Let's losethe spectacle,
shall we?

The White City

It is the year of our lord, 1893. The crackle of electricity's first sparks, the mechanical whine of Ferris's wheel, the tinkling of crystal from the majestic city atop the hill--the sounds of a new era pervade the air as the century's last World's Fair commences in Chicago. But darkness lurks beneath the metropolis so austere it has been dubbed the White City. Strikes loom on the horizon, racism runs rampant, and a murderer unlike any America has ever seen before is on the loose, terrorizing the city. His crimes are so brutal, newspapers have christened him the Husker. Hiding behind the cloak of a city in chaos, he taunts his pursuers, littering the grounds of the fair with the corpses of children as he slips through the shadows. Dr. Elizabeth Handley, the first forensic psychologist of her kind, has been called in to capture the killer, but when the son of prominent architect William Rockland goes missing, the case takes on an entirely new urgency. In this city of bombastic politics and cutthroat egos, everyone has his own agenda, but time is running out. As she races to save the boy, Dr. Handley fights to maintain her sanity as the line between captor and quarry blurs, and violence casts its spell. From the depths of the seediest brothels to the pristine enclaves of the elite, The White City is a strange, beguiling first novel by Alec Michod, a thriller that masterfully blends fact and fiction. An exhilarating voyeur's glimpse at Chicago in all its glory, it also probes the dark side that was never far from its core.

The White City

Public buildings, business houses and dwellings in every city, village and hamlet
throughout the loyal States were ... Then came the sorrowful march of the funeral
cortege from Washington to Springfield — the most impressive spectacle ...

The White City


Country Life

They are going to do this in all sorts of interesting and entertaining ways The
White City will be a blaze of life and colour . Wonderful Poster designs - whole ...
All London will flock to see the magnificent spectacle at the White City . Come
along ...

Country Life


The Physical City

MOVEMENT Forgotten Origins and Lost Meanings JON A. PETERSON City
University of New York Historians have paid ... That spectacle with its great water
basin framed by white palaces reminiscent of Ancient Rome and Renaissance
Italy ...

The Physical City

First Published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Literary Digest

There will be a greater variety of | real anniversary of the beginning of the grand
The spectacle presented by the “ White City , ” departments than ever before .
There will be est experiment in government in the history of in which all that ari ...

The Literary Digest


The Literary Digest

There will be a greater variety of | real anniversary of the beginning of the grand l'
he spectacle presented by the “ White City , ” departments than ever before .
There will be est experiment in government in the history of in which all that art ...

The Literary Digest


The Ruins of Urban Modernity

... 204 n.1 restructuring 7, 10, 16, 99 n.5, 117, 127, 129, 131 n. 11, 132, 138, 204–
5 spectacle 97, 100, 102, 109, 111, 134, 141–4, 147–50, 153, 158–9, 205, see
also White City uncanny 192–6 wilderness 117, 132–3, 135, 137–9, 141, 141 n.

The Ruins of Urban Modernity

The Ruins of Urban Modernity examines Thomas Pynchon's 2006 novel Against the Day through the critical lens of urban spatiality. Navigating the textual landscapes of New York, Venice, London, Los Angeles and the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, Against the Day reimagines urban modernity at the turn of the 20th century. As the complex novel collapses and rebuilds anew the spatial imaginaries underlying the popular fictions of urban modernity, Utku Mogultay explores how such creative disfiguration throws light on the contemporary urban world. Through critical spatial readings, he considers how Pynchon historicizes issues ranging from the commodification of the urban landscape to the politics of place-making. In Mogultay's reading, Against the Day is shown to offer an oblique negotiation of postmodern urban spaces, thus directing our attention to the ongoing erosion of sociospatial diversity in North American cities and elsewhere.

Spectacle and the city

A queue of taxis awaits to ferry the visitor through wide highways, gaily planted
with lush green trees and colourful – orange, purple, fuchsia, white – tropical
bougainvilleas, passing an endless parade of high-rise housing estates, the
clean ...

Spectacle and the city

China is urbanizing at an unprecedented speed. Filmmakers, artists, musicians, and writers all try to come to terms with the changes of their city. How is the Chinese city-as-spectacle, visualised and thus imagined and reimagined, if not contested, in art and popular culture? What are the possible escape routes from a completely commodified cityscape? How to realign artistic expressions of the spectacle with everyday practices? The imaginations of the Chinese city in art and popular culture that this book explores are not taken as merely mirroring or reflecting reality, on the contrary, they are part and parcel of the construction, destruction and deconstruction of that reality. As such, these imaginations are enmeshed in the social, material and political realities that produce Chinese cityscapes. Spectacle and the City: Chinese Urbanities in Art and Popular Culture brings together essays by an interdisciplinary team of experts on Chinese cities, including world-renowned scholars like Ackbar Abbas and Chua Beng Huat, as well as leading cultural critics like Ou Ning. Aiming to steer away from an exclusive focus on Mainland China, the adjective Chinese has a cultural meaning and includes places like Singapore and Hong Kong.

The Architecture of Pleasure

Rather thanan escape from the urban spectacle, theamusement park offered a
heightened versionofit: speeding rides, ... The tea gardensat Manchester's White
City werecarefully positionedso that its patrons were able tosurvey 'the constantly
 ...

The Architecture of Pleasure

The amusement parks which first appeared in England at the turn of the twentieth century represent a startlingly novel and complex phenomenon, combining fantasy architecture, new technology, ersatz danger, spectacle and consumption in a new mass experience. Though drawing on a diverse range of existing leisure practices, the particular entertainment formula they offered marked a radical departure in terms of visual, experiential and cultural meanings. The huge, socially mixed crowds that flocked to the new parks did so purely in the pursuit of pleasure, which the amusement parks commodified in exhilarating new guises. Between 1906 and 1939, nearly 40 major amusement parks operated across Britain. By the outbreak of the Second World War, millions of people visited these sites each year. The amusement park had become a defining element in the architectural psychological pleasurescape of Britain. This book considers the relationship between popular modernity, pleasure and the amusement park landscape in Britain from 1900-1939. It argues that the amusement parks were understood as a new and distinct expression of modern times which redefined the concept of public pleasure for mass audiences. Focusing on three sites – Blackpool Pleasure Beach, Dreamland in Margate and Southend's Kursaal – the book contextualises their development with references to the wider amusement park world. The meanings of these sites are explored through a detailed examination of the spatial and architectural form taken by rides and other buildings. The rollercoaster – a defining symbol of the amusement park – is given particular focus, as is the extent to which discourses of class, gender and national identity were expressed through the design of these parks.

The North Dakota Quarterly

A revelation , as well , was the way electric lighting could create spectacle and
beauty . The White City at night was America ' s first light show . It also contributed
to a new awareness that the word “ beauty " could apply to cities as well as ...

The North Dakota Quarterly