Spy Fiction Spy Films and Real Intelligence

This book won the Canadian Crime Writers' Arthur Ellis Award for the Best Genre Criticism/Reference book of 1991.

Spy Fiction  Spy Films and Real Intelligence

This book won the Canadian Crime Writers' Arthur Ellis Award for the Best Genre Criticism/Reference book of 1991. This collection of essays is an attempt to explore the history of spy fiction and spy films and investigate the significance of the ideas they contain. The volume offers new insights into the development and symbolism of British spy fiction.

Spies Wiretaps and Secret Operations A J

Spy Fiction, Spy Films, and Real Intelligence. Portland, OR: Frank Cass & Co., 1991. Booth, Nicholas. Zigzag: The Incredible Wartime Exploits of Double Agent Eddie Chapman. New York: Arcade Publication, 2007. Born, Hans, Loch Johnson, ...

Spies  Wiretaps  and Secret Operations  A J

A comprehensive two-volume overview and analysis of all facets of espionage in the American historical experience, focusing on key individuals and technologies. * Includes over 750 entries in chronologically organized sections, covering important spies, spying technologies, and events * Written by an expert team of contributing scholars from a variety of fields within history and political science * Provides a chronology of key events related to the use of espionage by the United States or by enemies within our borders * A glossary of key espionage terms * An extensive bibliography of print and electronic resources for further reading * Photos of key individuals plus maps of geographical locations and military engagements where espionage played an important role

Historical Dictionary of British Spy Fiction

“Normative Attitudes of Spies in Fiction.” In Mass Culture Revisited, edited by Bernard Rosenberg and ... “Secret-Agent Fiction: A Survey of Its Critical Literature with a Bibliography. ... Spy Fiction, Spy Films and Real Intelligence.

Historical Dictionary of British Spy Fiction

The Historical Dictionary of British Spy Fiction is a detailed overview of the rich history and achievements of the British espionage story in literature, cinema and television. It provides detailed yet accessible information on numerous individual authors, novels, films, filmmakers, television dramas and significant themes within the broader field of the British spy story. It contains a wealth of facts, insights and perspectives, and represents the best single source for the study and appreciation of British spy fiction. British spy fiction is widely regarded as the most significant and accomplished in the world and this book is the first attempt to bring together an informed survey of the achievements in the British spy story in literature, cinema and television. The Historical Dictionary of British Spy Fiction contains a chronology, an introduction, appendixes, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 200 cross-referenced entries on individual authors, stories, films, filmmakers, television shows and the various sub-genres of the British spy story. This book is an excellent access point for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about British spy fiction.

The 1980s British Conspiracy Thriller

Conspiracy Theory in Film, Television and Politics. Westport (Connecticut): Praeger, 1. 5. Neale, Stephen. Genre and Hollywood, 83. 6. Wark, Wesley K. 2015. Spy Fiction, Spy Films and Real Intelligence. UK: Routledge, 158. 7.

The 1980s British Conspiracy Thriller

"The British conspiracy cycle of the 1980s emerged in response to an increasingly Orwellian secret state in Great Britain. This book draws on original interviews with novelists, film-makers, and intelligence community insiders along with original case studies to explore one of the most politically charged periods in film and television history"--

Espionage in British Fiction and Film since 1900

Intelligence and National Security. Special Issue on “Spying in Film and Fiction.” Vol 23/1 (February 2008): 1–4. ... In Spy Fiction, Spy Films, and Real Intelligence, ed Wesley K. Wark. London: Frank Cass, 1991. 30–54. True Lies. Dir.

Espionage in British Fiction and Film since 1900

Espionage in British Fiction and Film Since 1900 traces the history and development of the British spy novel from its emergence in the early twentieth century, through its growth as a popular genre during the Cold War, to its resurgence in the early twenty-first century. Using an innovative structure, the chapters focus on specific categories of fictional spying (such as the accidental spy or the professional) and identify each type with a vital period in the evolution of the spy novel and film. A central section of the book considers how, with the creation of James Bond by Ian Fleming in the 1950s, the professional spy was launched on a new career of global popularity, enhanced by the Bond film franchise. In the realm of fiction, a glance at the fiction bestseller list will reveal the continuing appeal of novelists such as John le Carré, Frederick Forsyth, Charles Cumming, Stella Rimington, Daniel Silva, Alec Berenson, Christopher Reich—to name but a few—and illustrates the continued fascination with the spy novel into the twenty-first century, decades after the end of the Cold War. There is also a burgeoning critical interest in spy fiction, with a number of new studies appearing in recent years. A genre that many believed would falter and disappear after the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the Soviet empire has shown, if anything, increased signs of vitality. While exploring the origins of the British spy, tracing it through cultural and historical events, Espionage in British Fiction and Film Since 1900 also keeps in focus the essential role of the “changing enemy”—the chief adversary of and threat to Britain and its allies—in the evolution of spy fiction and cinema. The book concludes by analyzing examples of the enduring vitality of the British spy novel and film in the decades since the end of the Cold War.

Spies in Arabia

Spy Fiction, Spy Films and Real Intelligence. Intelligence and National Security 5:4 (1990). ——— , ed. Spy Fiction, Spy Films, and Real Intelligence. London: Frank Cass, 1991. Watson, Bruce. Desert Battle: Comparative Perspectives.

Spies in Arabia

In this groundbreaking book, Priya Satia tracks the intelligence community's tactical grappling with this problem and the myriad cultural, institutional, and political consequences of their methodological choices during and after the Great War.

Studies in Intelligence

The film Three Days of the Condor - starring Robert Redford as a CIA analyst whose job it is to read spy novels in order to extract plots for a giant CIA data base , and who turns into a " real " intelligence agent in order to uncover a ...

Studies in Intelligence


Alfred Hitchcock

1 David Trotter , ' The Politics of Adventure in the Early British Spy Novel , in Wesley K. Wark , ed . , Spy Fiction , Spy Films , and Real Intelligence , London : Frank Cass , 1991 , p . 31 .

Alfred Hitchcock

This collection of essays displays the range and breadth of Hitchcock scholarship and assesses the significance of his body of work as a bridge between the fin de siecle culture of the 19th century and the 20th century. It engages with Hitchcock's characteristic formal and aesthetic preoccupations.

Spyscreen

Espionage on Film and TV from the 1930s to the 1960s Professor of Cultural Studies and Cultural Policy Department of Cinema ... Ronald Reagan in Hollywood : Movies and Politics . ... Spy Fiction , Spy Films and Real Intelligence .

Spyscreen

Spyscreen is a genre study of English-language spy fiction film and television between the 1930s and 1960s. Taking as his focus many well-known films and television series, Toby Miller uses a wide range of critical approaches - from textual interpretation, audience studies, and culturalhistory, through auteurism, imperial history, class, and governmentality, to genre, cultural imperialism, and gender.Beginning with an overview of the social and political background to the history, production, and analysis of spy fiction, topics discussed include the first canonical espionage movie, The 39 Steps, key film noir texts such as Gilda and The Third Man, the figure of popular spies, including JamesBond, and the importance of women to the genre. The result is not just an insightful new study of key texts in this popular genre; it is an important intervention in the methodology and practice of Screen Studies.

Masculinities in British Adventure Fiction 1880 1915

'Decoding German Spies: British Spy Fiction, 1908–18', in Spy Fiction, Spy Films, and Real Intelligence, ed. Wesley K.Wark. London: Cass, 1991, 55–79. Himmelfarb, Gertrude. 'John Buchan: An Untimely Appreciation', Encounter 84 ...

Masculinities in British Adventure Fiction  1880   1915

Making use of recent masculinity theories, Joseph A. Kestner sheds new light on Victorian and Edwardian adventure fiction. Beginning with works published in the 1880s, when writers like H. Rider Haggard took inspiration from the First Boer War and the Zulu War, Kestner engages tales involving initiation and rites of passage, experiences with the non-Western Other, colonial contexts, and sexual encounters. Canonical authors such as R.L. Stevenson, Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Conrad, and Olive Schreiner are examined alongside popular writers like A.E.W. Mason, W.H. Hudson and John Buchan, providing an expansive picture of the crisis of masculinity that pervades adventure texts during the period.

Looking Glass Wars Spies on British Screens since 1960

Wark, Wesley K. (1990), 'Introduction: Fictions of History', Intelligence and National Security, 5(4), pp. 1-16. — (ed.) (1991), Spy Fiction, Spy Films and Real Intelligence, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge. West, Nigel, (2004), 'Fiction, ...

Looking Glass Wars  Spies on British Screens since 1960

Looking-Glass Wars: Spies on British Screens since 1960 is a detailed historical and critical overview of espionage in British film and television in the important period since 1960. From that date, the British spy screen was transformed under the influence of the tremendous success of James Bond in the cinema (the spy thriller), and of the new-style spy writing of John le Carré and Len Deighton (the espionage story). In the 1960s, there developed a popular cycle of spy thrillers in the cinema and on television. The new study looks in detail at the cycle which in previous work has been largely neglected in favour of the James Bond films. The study also brings new attention to espionage on British television and popular secret agent series such as Spy Trap, Quiller and The Sandbaggers. It also gives attention to the more ‘realistic’ representation of spying in the film and television adaptations of le Carré and Deighton, and other dramas with a more serious intent. In addition, there is wholly original attention given to ‘nostalgic’ spy fictions on screen, adaptations of classic stories of espionage which were popular in the late 1970s and through the 1980s, and to ‘historical’ spy fiction, dramas which treated ‘real’ cases of espionage and their characters, most notably the notorious Cambridge Spies. Detailed attention is also given to the ‘secret state’ thriller, a cycle of paranoid screen dramas in the 1980s which portrayed the intelligence services in a conspiratorial light, best understood as a reaction to excessive official secrecy and anxieties about an unregulated security service. The study is brought up-to-date with an examination of screen espionage in Britain since the end of the Cold War. The approach is empirical and historical. The study examines the production and reception, literary and historical contexts of the films and dramas. It is the first detailed overview of the British spy screen in its crucial period since the 1960s and provides fresh attention to spy films, series and serials never previously considered.

Haig and Kitchener in Twentieth Century Britain

The interwar years have generally been viewed as a period in which spy novels took a turn towards more realistic ... 'Introduction: Fictions of History', in W. Wark, ed., Spy Fiction, Spy Films and Real Intelligence (London, 1991), pp.

Haig and Kitchener in Twentieth Century Britain

Lord Kitchener and Lord Haig are two monumental figures of the First World War. Their reputations, both in their lifetimes and after their deaths, have been attacked and defended, scrutinized and contested. They have been depicted in film, print and public memorials in Britain and the wider world, and new biographies of both men appear to this day. The material representations of Haig and Kitchener were shaped, used and manipulated for official and popular ends by a variety of groups at different times during the twentieth century. The purpose of this study is not to discover the real individual, nor to attack or defend their reputations, rather it is an exploration of how both men have been depicted since their deaths and to consider what this tells us about the nature and meaning of First World War commemoration. While Haig's representation was more contested before the Second World War than was Kitchener's, with several constituencies trying to fashion and use Haig's memory - the Government, the British Legion, ex-servicemen themselves, and bereaved families - it was probably less contested, but overwhelmingly more negative, than Kitchener's after the Second World War. The book sheds light on the notion of 'heroic' masculinity - questioning, in particular, the degree to which the image of the common soldier replaced that of the high commander in the popular imagination - and explores how the military heritage in the twentieth century came into collision with the culture of modernity. It also contributes to ongoing debates in British historiography and to the larger debates over the social construction of memory, the problematic relation between what is considered 'heritage' and 'history', and the need for historians to be sensitive and attentive to the interconnections between heritage and history and their contexts.

Spies of the Kaiser

Knowing One's Enemies: Intelligence Assessment before the Two World Wars (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1984), pp. 62–97. ... Spy Fiction, Spy Films and Real Intelligence (London: Frank Cass, 1991), pp. 55–79.

Spies of the Kaiser

Spies of the Kaiser examines the scope and objectives of German covert operations in Great Britain before and during the First World War. It assesses the effect of German espionage on Anglo-German relations and discusses the extent to which the fear of German espionage in the United Kingdom shaped the British intelligence community in the early Twentieth-century. The study is based on original archival material, including hitherto unexploited German records and recently declassified British documents.

Sherlock s Sisters

in Fiction and Real Life«, Saturday Review 17 (1864), 712¥13. Sterett, Susan. ... Politics of Adventure in the Early British Spy Novel«, in Spy Fiction, Spy Films and Real Intelligence, ed. Wark, (1991), 30¥54. Usborne, Richard.

Sherlock s Sisters

Sherlock's Sisters: The British Female Detective, 1864-1913 examines the fictional female detective in Victorian and Edwardian literature. This character, originating in the 1860s, configures a new representation of women in narratives of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This analysis explores female empowerment through professional unofficial or official detection, especially as this surveillance illuminates legal, moral, gendered, institutional, criminal, punitive, judicial, political, and familial practices. This book considers a range of literary texts by both female and male writers which concentrate on detection by women, particularly those which followed the creation of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887. Cultural movements, such as the emergence of the New Woman, property law or suffragism, are stressed in the exploits of these resourceful investigators. These daring women deal with a range of crimes, including murder, blackmail, terrorism, forgery, theft, sexual harassment, embezzlement, fraud, impersonation and domestic violence. Privileging the exercise of reason rather than intuition, these women detectives are proto-feminist in their demonstration of women's independence. Instead of being under the law, these women transform it. Their investigations are given particular edge because many of the perpetrators of these crimes are women. Sherlock's Sisters probes many texts which, because of their rarity, have been under-researched. Writers such as Beatrice Heron-Maxwell, Emmuska Orczy, L.T. Meade, Catherine Pirkis, Fergus Hume, Grant Allen, Leonard Merrick, Marie Belloc Lowndes, George Sims, McDonnell Bodkin and Richard Marsh are here incorporated into the canon of Victorian and Edwardian literature, many for the first time. A writer such as Mary Elizabeth Braddon is reassessed through a neglected novel. The book includes works by Irish and Australian writers to present an inclusive array of British texts. Sherlock's Sisters enlarges the perception of emerging female empowerment during the nineteenth century, filling an important gap in the fields of Gender Studies, Law/Literature and Popular Culture.

Morality and the Law in British Detective and Spy Fiction 1880 1920

The Silent Game: The Real World of Imaginary Spies. Athens: The University of ... Women Writers and Detectives in Nineteenth Century Detective Fiction: The Mothers of the Mystery Genre. ... Spy Fiction, Spy Films and Real Intelligence.

Morality and the Law in British Detective and Spy Fiction  1880 1920

Who decides what is right or wrong, ethical or immoral, just or unjust? In the world of crime and spy fiction between 1880 and 1920, the boundaries of the law were blurred and justice called into question humanity's moral code. As fictional detectives mutated into spies near the turn of the century, the waning influence of morality on decision-making signaled a shift in behavior from idealistic principles towards a pragmatic outlook taken in the national interest. Taking a fresh approach to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's popular protagonist, Sherlock Holmes, this book examines how Holmes and his rival maverick literary detectives and spies manipulated the law to deliver a fairer form of justice than that ordained by parliament. Multidisciplinary, this work views detective fiction through the lenses of law, moral philosophy, and history, and incorporates issues of gender, equality, and race. By studying popular publications of the time, it provides a glimpse into public attitudes towards crime and morality and how those shifting opinions helped reconstruct the hero in a new image.

Espionage Past Present and Future

For a broad approach to this issue that discusses non-western societies, see Adda Bozeman, Strategic Intelligence and Statecraft (Riverside, NJ, 1992). ... Spy Fiction, Spy Films and Real Intelligence (London, 1991). E James Der Derian, ...

Espionage  Past  Present and Future

Highlights of the volume include pioneering essays on the methodology of intelligence studies by Michael Fry and Miles Hochstein, and the future perils of the surveillance state by James Der Derian. Two leading authorities on the history of Soviet/Russian intelligence, Christopher Andrew and Oleg Gordievsky, contribute essays on the final days of the KGB. Also, the mythology surrounding the life of Second World War intelligence chief, Sir William Stephenson, The Man Called Intrepid', is penetrated in a persuasive revisionist account by Timothy Naftali. The collection is rounded off by a series of essays devoted to unearthing the history of the Canadian intelligence service.

Defending Ireland

... of post-war British defence folklore, and it has been sustained in popular fiction. On this see K. Jeffery and E. O'Halpin, 'Ireland in Spy Fiction', in W. Wark (ed.), Spy Fiction, Spy Films and Real Intelligence (London, 1991), ...

Defending Ireland

This fascinating and original book is the first to analyse the evolution of internal security policy and external defence policy in Ireland from independence to the present day. Professor O'Halpin examines the very limited concept of external defence understood by the first generation of Irish leaders, going on to chart the state's repeated struggles with the IRA and with other perceived internal and external threats to stability. He explores the state's defence and security relations with Britain and the United States and, drawing extensively on newly released records, he deals authoritatively with problems of subversion, espionage, counterintelligence and codebreaking during the Second World War. In conclusion, the book analyses significant post-Second World War developments, including anti-communist co-operation with Western powers, the emergence of UN service as a key element of Irish foreign and defence policy, the state's response to the Northern Ireland crisis since 1969, and Ireland's difficulties in addressing the collective security dilemmas facing the European Union in the post-Cold War era. It is essential reading for anyone wishing to understand the development of independent Ireland since 1922.

Queen s Quarterly

Keith Neilson and B.J.C. McKercher , Go Spy the Land : Military Intelligence in History ( Westport , Connecticut : 1992 ) . ... The Development of the Espionage Film , ” in Spy Fiction , Spy Films and Real Intelligence , ed .

Queen s Quarterly


Cinematic Terror

Spy Fiction, Spy Films and Real Intelligence (London: Frank Cass, 1991); Simon Baker, 'O. H. M. S.', BFI screenonline http://www.screenonline.org.uk/film/id/1114362/ (11 September 2013), where the film can be viewed; Simon Baker, ...

Cinematic Terror

Cinematic Terror takes a uniquely long view of filmmakers' depiction of terrorism, examining how cinema has been a site of intense conflict between paramilitaries, state authorities and censors for well over a century. In the process, it takes us on a journey from the first Age of Terror that helped trigger World War One to the Global War on Terror that divides countries and families today. Tony Shaw looks beyond Hollywood to pinpoint important trends in the ways that film industries across Europe, North and South America, Asia, Africa and the Middle East have defined terrorism down the decades. Drawing on a vast array of studio archives, government documentation, personal interviews and box office records, Shaw examines the mechanics of cinematic terrorism and challenges assumptions about the links between political violence and propaganda.