Spying in America in the Post 9 11 World

This book presents an investigation of intelligence collection in the United States that examines the delicate balance of civil liberties with the effectiveness of intelligence collection.

Spying in America in the Post 9 11 World

This book examines the realities of living in the United States after the events of September 11th, 2001, and evaluates the challenges in gathering internal intelligence without severely compromising personal liberties. * Maps clarify America's security threats in a global and domestic context * Photographs depict historic events like the attacks of September 11, 2001, the Oklahoma City bombing, and the signing of the U.S. Constitution * Includes a bibliography of reference sources and recommended reading as well as an index of interviewees and quotations * A glossary explains the most commonly used terms in intelligence and homeland security

The History of Espionage

'The History of Espionage' recounts the fascinating story of spies and spying from the cloak-and-dagger machinations of the ancient Greeks and Romans to the high-tech surveillance operations of the post 9/11 world.

The History of Espionage

'The History of Espionage' recounts the fascinating story of spies and spying from the cloak-and-dagger machinations of the ancient Greeks and Romans to the high-tech surveillance operations of the post 9/11 world.

Spying Blind

The documentation is extensive but straightforward and not cumbersome. The book moves along briskly--a good read. This is not common in the political-science literature and certainly not with a subject matter such as intelligence.

Spying Blind

In this pathbreaking book, Amy Zegart provides the first scholarly examination of the intelligence failures that preceded September 11. Until now, those failures have been attributed largely to individual mistakes. But Zegart shows how and why the intelligence system itself left us vulnerable. Zegart argues that after the Cold War ended, the CIA and FBI failed to adapt to the rise of terrorism. She makes the case by conducting painstaking analysis of more than three hundred intelligence reform recommendations and tracing the history of CIA and FBI counterterrorism efforts from 1991 to 2001, drawing extensively from declassified government documents and interviews with more than seventy high-ranking government officials. She finds that political leaders were well aware of the emerging terrorist danger and the urgent need for intelligence reform, but failed to achieve the changes they sought. The same forces that have stymied intelligence reform for decades are to blame: resistance inside U.S. intelligence agencies, the rational interests of politicians and career bureaucrats, and core aspects of our democracy such as the fragmented structure of the federal government. Ultimately failures of adaptation led to failures of performance. Zegart reveals how longstanding organizational weaknesses left unaddressed during the 1990s prevented the CIA and FBI from capitalizing on twenty-three opportunities to disrupt the September 11 plot. Spying Blind is a sobering account of why two of America's most important intelligence agencies failed to adjust to new threats after the Cold War, and why they are unlikely to adapt in the future.

Surveillance and Terror in Post 9 11 British and American Television

2, 2006, https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ uknews/1533054/Britain-the-most-spied-on-nation-in-the-world.html. Often, sources focus specifically on espionage in terms of the history of surveillance and the nation state (especially, ...

Surveillance and Terror in Post 9 11 British and American Television

This interdisciplinary study examines how state surveillance has preoccupied British and American television series in the twenty years since 9/11. Surveillance and Terror in Post-9/11 British and American Television illuminates how the U.S. and U.K., bound by an historical, cultural, and television partnership, have broadcast numerous programs centred on three state surveillance apparatuses tasked with protecting us from terrorism and criminal activity: the prison, the police, and the national intelligence agency. Drawing from a range of case studies, such as Sherlock, Orange is the New Black and The Night Manager, this book discusses how television allows viewers, writers, and producers to articulate fears about an increased erosion of privacy and civil liberties following 9/11, while simultaneously expressing a desire for a preventative mechanism that can stop such events occurring in the future. However, these concerns and desires are not new; encompassing surveillance narratives both past and present, this book demonstrates how television today builds on earlier narratives about panoptic power to construct our present understanding of government surveillance.

America Exceptionalism in Television Spy Dramas

This thesis explores the potential for American television spy dramas to mainstream their viewers to see America as exceptional, thereby seeing America as superior and in a unique position of power to inflict its beliefs on the rest of the ...

America Exceptionalism in Television Spy Dramas

This thesis explores the potential for American television spy dramas to mainstream their viewers to see America as exceptional, thereby seeing America as superior and in a unique position of power to inflict its beliefs on the rest of the world. This notion of American exceptionalism has existed since the founding of the United States and has often been a source of pride for the country. However, in the post-9/11 world, this component of American nationalism continues to contribute to the disdain terrorists feel in response to the Western world and American ideology. TV spy shows, through their established conventions and norms, potentially perpetuate the American characteristics that fuel terrorism aimed toward the West and the United States. As such, America was engaged in some historic events during the 1960s. The civil rights movement, being among them, had a tremendous impact on the makeup and ideology of the country. Accordingly, the television also played a role. By using media, cultural, and psychological theories, three American spy shows and their potential effects they had on viewers will be explored. "I Spy," a mid-1960s television spy drama, portrayed the ideal America, an America immune to the problems associated with race. This thesis will examine the show's positive portrayal of an exceptional America. Then, after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, TV spy dramas centered on the threat of terrorism and America's preparation and response to possible threats, which became a part of the nation's character. In contrast to "I Spy" and the 1960s, examples from "Sleeper Cell" and "24" will exemplify how these current shows depict a post-9/11 world in which America's exceptionalism seemingly could feed the terrorism it fights against.

The History of Espionage

Recounts the fascinating story of spies and spying from the cloak-and-dagger machinations of the Ancient Greeks and Romans to the high-tech surveillance operations of the post-9/11, post-truth world.

The History of Espionage

Recounts the fascinating story of spies and spying from the cloak-and-dagger machinations of the Ancient Greeks and Romans to the high-tech surveillance operations of the post-9/11, post-truth world.

Studies in Intelligence

Books Reviewed in Studies in Intelligence 2011 Current Topics and Issues Following book titles and author names are ... ( 55 1 [ March ) , Bookshelf ) Spying in America in the Post 9/11 World : Domestic Threat and the Need for Change by ...

Studies in Intelligence


In the Shadow of the Sphinx

In the process, this book attempts to give the reader some appreciation of the total contribution counterintelligence has made to the security of the Nation and its Army.

In the Shadow of the Sphinx

For nearly a century, counterintelligence has played a crucial role in providing force protection to the Army while keeping the Nation’s most guarded secrets. Today, it continues to play an integral part in America’s first line of defense in the war against global terrorism. In the Shadow of the Sphinx, an absorbing new history of Army counterintelligence, now reveals the real stories of the soldiers and civilians of Army counterintelligence on the front lines of three major wars and the shadowy Cold War conflict of spy versus counterspy. Explosions in American cities and spies crossing international borders are not unique to the post 9-11 world. In the Shadow of the Sphinx traces the origins of Army counterintelligence to the need to counter such threats as far back as World War I. This authoritative, profusely illustrated official history follows the Army’s shadowy war of spies versus spies through two World Wars, Korea, Vietnam, and the Cold War. In the Shadow of the Sphinx includes fascinating tales of: True spy stories from World War I through the end of the Cold War Securing the Manhattan Project Handling denazification in post-war Germany, Grappling with the emerging threat of communism And much more!

Illusions of Security

The government is spying on us. Here's how, and what we can do about it.

Illusions of Security

The government is spying on us. Here's how, and what we can do about it.

Post 9 11 Espionage Fiction in the US and Pakistan

Spies and "Terrorists" Cara N. Cilano ... As Richard Crownshaw (2011: 758) argues, American post9/11 literary and cultural responses “are often preoccupied with [...] the time of trauma rather than the space of American territory.

Post 9 11 Espionage Fiction in the US and Pakistan

As the events of 11 September 2001 and their aftermath influence new developments in spy fiction as a popular genre, an examination of these literary narratives concerned with espionage and terrorism can reshape our approach to non-fictive representations of the same concerns. Post-9/11 Espionage Fiction in the US and Pakistan examines post-9/11 American spy fictions alongside Pakistani novels that draw upon many of the same figures, tropes, and conventions. As the Pakistani texts re-place spy fiction’s conventions, they offer another vantage point from which to view the affective appeals common to these conventions’ usual deployment in American texts. This book argues that the appropriation by Pakistani writers of these conventions insistently tracks how the formulaic and popular nature of post-9/11 American espionage thrillers forwards and reinforces "appropriate" affective responses, often linked to domestic sites and relations, to "terrorism." It also analyses and compares American and Pakistani representations of the twinned figures of the spy (or his proxy) and the "terrorist," a term frequently conflated with fundamentalist. The insights of these analyses can serve as interpretive interruptions of non-fictive representations of Pakistani-US "war on terror" relations. Offering an innovative analysis of the reflection of narrative conventions in our view of the real-life events, this book will attract scholars with an interest in Pakistani literature, Postcolonial literature, Asian Studies and Terrorism studies.

Ethics of Spying

Ethics of Spying: A Reader for the Intelligence Professional, Volume 2 seeks to define an intelligence professional while utilizing various theoretical and practical perspectives.

Ethics of Spying

Ethics of Spying: A Reader for the Intelligence Professional, Volume 2 seeks to define an intelligence professional while utilizing various theoretical and practical perspectives. Prominent scholars explore ethics through the intelligence cycle and how ethics is evolving and viewed in a post-9/11 world. The book concludes with a survey on ethical conduct by interrogators, a brief history of intelligence reform, and a bibliography on this subject.

American Surveillance

Marks, Ronald A. Spying in America in the Post 9/11 World: Domestic Threat and the Need for Change. Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger, 2010. Marx, Gary T. Undercover: Police Surveillance in America. Berkeley: University of California Press, ...

American Surveillance

A nuanced history and analysis of intelligence-gathering versus privacy rights.

American Spies

In the post-9/11 world, a spy in the US government filching secret documents from a safe hardly rivaled the threat from a terrorist hatching a plot to detonate a nuclear bomb in a major US city. Spying against America, however, ...

American Spies

A history of Americans who spied against their country and what their stories reveal about national security What’s your secret? American Spies presents the stunning histories of more than forty Americans who spied against their country during the past six decades. Michael Sulick, former head of the CIA’s clandestine service, illustrates through these stories—some familiar, others much less well known—the common threads in the spy cases and the evolution of American attitudes toward espionage since the onset of the Cold War. After highlighting the accounts of many who have spied for traditional adversaries such as Russian and Chinese intelligence services, Sulick shows how spy hunters today confront a far broader spectrum of threats not only from hostile states but also substate groups, including those conducting cyberespionage. Sulick reveals six fundamental elements of espionage in these stories: the motivations that drove them to spy; their access and the secrets they betrayed; their tradecraft, or the techniques of concealing their espionage; their exposure; their punishment; and, finally, the damage they inflicted on America’s national security. The book is the sequel to Sulick’s popular Spying in America: Espionage from the Revolutionary War to the Dawn of the Cold War. Together they serve as a basic introduction to understanding America’s vulnerability to espionage, which has oscillated between peacetime complacency and wartime vigilance, and continues to be shaped by the inherent conflict between our nation’s security needs and our commitment to the preservation of civil liberties. Now available in paperback, with a new preface that brings the conversation up to the present, American Spies is as insightful and relevant as ever.

The CIA at War

The book explores whether the CIA can be trusted, whether its intelligence is politicized, and whether it is capable of winning the war on terror. In doing so, the book weaves in the history of the CIA and how it really works.

The CIA at War

With the CIA at the core of the war on terror, no agency is as important to preserving America's freedom. Yet the CIA is a closed and secretive world-impenetrable to generations of journalists-and few Americans know what really goes on among the spy masters who plot America's worldwide campaign against terrorists. Only Ronald Kessler, an award-winning former Washington Post and Wall Street Journal investigative reporter, could have gained the unprecedented access to tell the story. Kessler interviewed fifty current CIA officers, including all the agency's top officials, and toured areas of the CIA the media has never seen. The agency actively encouraged retired CIA officers and officials to talk with him as well. In six years as director, George J. Tenet has never appeared on TV shows and has given only a handful of print interviews, all before 9/11, but Tenet agreed to be interviewed by Kessler for this book. He spoke candidly and passionately about the events of 9/11, the war on terror, the agency's intelligence on Iraq, and the controversies surrounding the agency. The CIA at War tells the inside story of how Tenet, a son of Greek immigrants, turned around the CIA from a pathetic, risk averse outfit to one that has rolled up 3,000 terrorists since 9/11, was critically important to winning in Afghanistan and Iraq, and now kills terrorists with its Predator drone aircraft. The book portrays Tenet as a true American hero, one who overcame every kind of Washington obstacle and the destructive actions of previous director John Deutch to make the agency a success. As Tenet said in a recent speech, "Nowhere in the world could the son of an immigrant stand before you as the director of Central Intelligence. This is simply the greatest country on the face of the earth." The CIA at War discloses highly sensitive information about the CIA's unorthodox methods and its stunning successes and shocking failures. The book explores whether the CIA can be trusted, whether its intelligence is politicized, and whether it is capable of winning the war on terror. In doing so, the book weaves in the history of the CIA and how it really works. It is the definitive account of the agency. From the CIA's intelligence failure of 9/11 to its critical role in preventing further attacks, The CIA at War tells a riveting, unique story about a secretive, powerful agency and its confrontation with global terrorism.

The Cambridge Handbook of Social Problems

Spying in America in the Post 9/11 World: Domestic Threat and the Need for Change. Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger. Masse, Todd. 2003. Domestic Intelligence in the United Kingdom: Applicability of the MI-5 Model to the United States.

The Cambridge Handbook of Social Problems

The introduction of the Affordable Care Act in the United States, the increasing use of prescription drugs, and the alleged abuse of racial profiling by police are just some of the factors contributing to twenty-first-century social problems. The Cambridge Handbook of Social Problems offers a wide-ranging roster of the social problems currently pressing for attention and amelioration. Unlike other works in this area, it also gives great consideration to theoretical and methodological discussions. This Handbook will benefit both undergraduate and graduate students eager to understand the sociology of social problems. It is suitable for classes in social problems, current events, and social theory. Featuring the most current research, the Handbook provides an especially useful resource for sociologists and graduate students conducting research.

Rebuilding American Military Power in the Pacific A 21st Century Strategy

... and Future Conflicts James Jay Carafano Fighting Identity: Sacred War and World Change Michael Vlahos The Three Images of Ethnic War Querine Hanlon Spying in America in the Post 9/11 World: Domestic Threat and the Need for Change ...

Rebuilding American Military Power in the Pacific  A 21st Century Strategy

This volume examines how the U.S. military must rebuild in the wake of Iraq/Afghanistan, and refocus its power projection to face the new challenges emerging in the Pacific and with China. • Examines the nature of the destabilizing threat that China presents to the power balance of the Pacific, along with how the United States can work with its allies to shape a 21st-century strategy • Discusses in detail the necessity for reshaping the U.S. military after the land wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the ways in which American forces can be rebuilt for the future • Explains why the evolving Pacific theater is an area of critical operations and will require significant change in terms of how U.S. forces operate to deal with emerging threats • Assesses how new capabilities associated with emerging technologies—notably the Osprey, the F-35 aircraft, the Aegis Combat Systems, and a number of new European systems—allow new opportunities to work with our allies

The Shadow Factory

James Bamford has been the preeminent expert on the National Security Agency since his reporting revealed the agency’s existence in the 1980s.

The Shadow Factory

James Bamford has been the preeminent expert on the National Security Agency since his reporting revealed the agency’s existence in the 1980s. Now Bamford describes the transformation of the NSA since 9/11, as the agency increasingly turns its high-tech ears on the American public. The Shadow Factory reconstructs how the NSA missed a chance to thwart the 9/11 hijackers and details how this mistake has led to a heightening of domestic surveillance. In disturbing detail, Bamford describes exactly how every American’s data is being mined and what is being done with it. Any reader who thinks America’s liberties are being protected by Congress will be shocked and appalled at what is revealed here.

The Mulberry Bush

Yet, despite the passion between them, he refuses to lose sight of his ultimate goal: destroying the institution that ruined his father all those years ago. “Set in a post–9/11 world, [but] satisfyingly steeped in undercover tales of a ...

The Mulberry Bush

A novel of international espionage and personal vengeance from the author Lee Child called “better than John Le Carré.” Many years ago, a young American spy crossed the wrong people and found himself on the wrong side of Headquarters. He soon fell into a slow, shameful decline of poverty and self-destruction. But Headquarters didn’t count on him having a son. Now, years later, the boy is an American spy himself, serving two masters: Headquarters and his own insatiable need for revenge. Sent to Argentina to infiltrate a revolutionary group with deep ties to Russia, the young man finds himself dangerously drawn to his target’s daughter. Yet, despite the passion between them, he refuses to lose sight of his ultimate goal: destroying the institution that ruined his father all those years ago. “Set in a post–9/11 world, [but] satisfyingly steeped in undercover tales of a particular vintage” (The Washington Post), Mulberry Bush is an intricate and sexy espionage thriller from one of the most acclaimed writers in the game. “McCarry spins his riveting story in unexpected ways; the writing is always subdued but brilliant, leading unsuspecting readers to collide straight into the unforgiving wall of a stunning ending.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review

Terror on the Screen

Themes of post-9/11 racism and discrimination in Family Guy and American Dad were rivaled in hilarity and scathing criticism by some American spy-puppets that police the world. Matt Stone and Trey Parker's Irony: America! Fuck Yeah!

Terror on the Screen

"Through dazzling close readings of a wide variety of cultural texts, from the "Battlestar Galactica" reboot to post-9/11 pornography, Howie is able to demonstrate how the politics and poetics of witnessing' have come to structure the experience of American popular culture in the past decade."--Jeff Melnick, University of Massachusett, Boston.