St Anselm and the Handmaidens of God

Vaughn argues that Anselm collected and edited his own letters, which addressed real women and situations, but also represented particular ideals of women, marriage, parents and children, students and teachers; that the correspondence, an ...

St  Anselm and the Handmaidens of God

As abbot of Bec and archbishop of Canterbury, the renowned theologian St. Anselm spent most of his career working 'in the world', primarily with laypersons, not in the cloister. His correspondence contains surprisingly many letters to laywomen, only a few perfunctory letters to nuns and abbesses. Anselm wrote to all estates of noble laywomen: young girls, mothers, mature wives or widows, countesses and queens. Vaughn argues that Anselm collected and edited his own letters, which addressed real women and situations, but also represented particular ideals of women, marriage, parents and children, students and teachers; that the correspondence, an artful construct, was almost an autobiography, teaching by word, deed, and his own example; and a lens through which to discern Anselm's views of men and women in Anselm's ideal society. Anselm accords women surprising equality and power, seeing queens as equal to both kings and archbishops, all three primarily as nurturers and teachers, and ideal married couples writ large - social views modelled on past ideals (primarily St. Gregory), but ironically leaping toward new Twelfth Century attitudes of introspection, self-analysis, individualism, and logic and reason in theology, social issues, politics and law. Mothers and teachers emerge as the ultimate Handmaidens of God.

Archbishop Anselm 1093 1109

37 Sally N. Vaughn, St. Anselm and the Handmaidens of God: A Study of Anselm's Correspondence with Women (Brepols, Turnhout, 2000). 38 “I saw many evils in that country which I ought not to have tolerated but which I was unable to ...

Archbishop Anselm 1093   1109

St Anselm's archiepiscopal career, 1093-1109, spanned the reigns of two kings: William Rufus and the early years of Henry I. As the second archbishop of Canterbury after the Norman Conquest, Anselm strove to extend the reforms of his teacher and mentor at Bec, and his predecessor at Canterbury, Archbishop Lanfranc. Exploring Anselm's thirty years as Prior and Abbot of the large, rich, Norman monastery of Bec, and teacher in its school, this book notes the wealth of experiences which prepared Anselm for his archiepiscopal career--in particular Bec's missionary attitude toward England. Sally Vaughn examines Anselm's intellectual strengths as a teacher, philosopher and theologian: exploring his highly regarded theological texts, including his popular Prayers and Meditations, and how his statesmanship was influenced as he dealt with conflict with the antagonistic King William Rufus. Vaughn argues that Rufus's death influenced Anselm's rivalry with King Henry I and fostered a more subdued and civil conflict between Anselm and Henry which ended with cooperation between king and archbishop at the end of Anselm's life. King and archbishop became’yoked together as two oxen pulling the plow of the church through the land of England’. Anselm’s final years at the pinnacle of power reveal a superb administrator over Canterbury and Primate over the churches of all Britain, in which position his followers described him as 'Pope of another world'. The final section includes a selection of original source material including archiepiscopal letters drawn primarily from Lambeth Palace Library.

Anselm of Canterbury and his Theological Inheritance

Southern, R.W. and F.S. Schmitt (eds) (1969), Memorials of St. Anselm, London: Oxford University Press. Staunton, Michael (1997), 'Eadmer's ... Vaughn, Sally N. (2002), St Anselm and the Handmaidens of God, Turnhout: Brepols Publishers.

Anselm of Canterbury and his Theological Inheritance

Anselm of Canterbury is one of the most famous of medieval Christian thinkers, who left a considerable political and intellectual inheritance of his own. This book reveals that the theological and intellectual inheritance available to Anselm was more dynamic, broader and deeper than is traditionally thought and Anselm was influenced by more than just the works of St Augustine. Giles Gasper focuses particularly on the part played by the translated works of the Greek Fathers. Demonstrating how widely the writings of the Fathers of the Church were available in western libraries, Gasper goes on to compare key aspects of doctrine in Anselm's thought with that of the notable Greek Fathers. Questioning the way in which Anselm and other authors have been described, this book moves away from well worn routes of interpretation and provides new perspectives on this most significant figure in the history of the church, the middle ages, and western thought.

Anselm of Canterbury

Stolz, Anselm (1968), 'Anselm's Theology in the Proslogion', in Hick, John and Arthur C. McGill (eds), The Many-Faced Argument, ... Vaughn, Sally N. (2002), St Anselm and the Handmaidens of God, Turnhout: Brepols Publishers.

Anselm of Canterbury

Anselm is a major figure in theological, philosophical and historical studies. This book provides a fresh approach to the study of this great figure; one which provides critical interaction with current critical thinking whilst arguing in favour of the idea of theological unity in Anselm's corpus. Exploring the Proslogion, but also more 'minor' works, David Hogg interacts with the theological content of Anselm's writings: showing how Anselm's ontological argument fits into the wider context of his theology; comparing the holistic approach of Anselm's thought with that of other medieval personages and fitting him into the wider medieval context; and revealing how Anselm's theology integrates the atonement and questions of predestination, the fall of the Devil and free will, and other issues. The book concludes with an assessment of the impact of Anselm's theology during his own time, and the continuing effect his thinking has had on succeeding centuries of theological development.

God in Proof

See Jean Leclerecq, The Love of Learning and the Desire for God: A Study of Monastic Culture, trans. Catharine Misrahi (New York: Fordham University Press, 1982), 176–79. 12. See Sally Vaughn, St Anselm and the Handmaidens of God: A ...

God in Proof

In this tour of the history of arguments for and against the existence of God, Nathan Schneider embarks on a remarkable intellectual, historical, and theological journey through the centuries of believers and unbelievers—from ancient Greeks, to medieval Arabs, to today’s most eminent philosophers and the New Atheists. Framed by an account of Schneider’s own unique journey, God in Proof illuminates the great minds who wrestled with one of history’s biggest questions together with their arguments, bringing them to life in their time, and our own. Schneider’s sure-handed portrayal of the characters and ideas involved in the search for proof challenges how we normally think about doubt and faith while showing that, in their quest for certainty and the proofs to declare it, thinkers on either side of the God divide are often closer to one another than they would like to think.

Bury St Edmunds and the Norman Conquest

In Anselm's letters the first addressee is a clergyman named Robert who is presented as the spiritual leader of the women, perhaps one of the ... For an earlier date in the 1090s, see S. Vaughn, St Anselm and the Handmaidens of God: A ...

Bury St Edmunds and the Norman Conquest

Responses to the impact of the Norman Conquest examined through the wealth of evidence provided by the important abbey of Bury St Edmunds.

Friendship in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Age

Sally N. Vaughn, St. Anselm and the Handmaidens of God: A Study of Anselm's Correspondence with Women (Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols, 2002) and ”St. Anselm and his Students Writing about Love: A Theological Foundation for the Rise of ...

Friendship in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Age

Although it seems that erotic love generally was the prevailing topic in the medieval world and the Early Modern Age, parallel to this the Ciceronian ideal of friendship also dominated the public discourse, as this collection of essays demonstrates. Following an extensive introduction, the individual contributions explore the functions and the character of friendship from Late Antiquity (Augustine) to the 17th century. They show the spectrum of variety in which this topic appeared ‑ not only in literature, but also in politics and even in painting.

Godfrey of Bouillon

230–1 (no. 247). 284 On Anselm's correspondence with Ida, see: Sally N. Vaughn, St Anselm and the Handmaidens of God: A Study of Anselm's Correspondence With Women (Turnhout, 2002), pp. 126–59; Eadem, 'Anselm in Italy, 1097– 1100', ANS, ...

Godfrey of Bouillon

This book offers a new appraisal of the ancestry and career of Godfrey of Bouillon (c.1060-1100), a leading participant in the First Crusade (1096-99), and the first ruler of Latin Jerusalem (1099-1100), the polity established by the crusaders after they captured the Holy City. While previous studies of Godfrey’s life have tended to focus on his career from the point at which he joined the crusade, this book adopts a more holistic approach, situating his involvement in the expedition in the light of the careers of his ancestors and his own activities in Lotharingia, the westernmost part of the kingdom of Germany. The findings of this enquiry shed new light on the repercussions of a range of critical developments in Latin Christendom in the eleventh and early twelfth centuries, including the impact of the ‘Investiture Conflict’ in Lotharingia, the response to the call for the First Crusade in Germany, Godfrey’s influence upon the course of the crusade, his role in its leadership, and his activities during the initial phases of Latin settlement in the Holy Land in its aftermath.

Nuns Priests Tales

Vaughn explores Anselm's correspondence with women, noting his attention particularly to “powerful aristocratic married women.” Vaughn, St. Anselm and the Handmaidens of God, 2. For Anselm's letters to abbesses and nuns, see Vaughn, ...

Nuns  Priests  Tales

Nuns' Priests Tales explores the spiritual ideas that motivated priestly service to nuns across Europe and throughout the medieval period, revealing the central role that women played in male spiritual life, and thus moving beyond the reductionist assumption that celibacy defined male spirituality in the age of reform.

The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West

Scott G. Bruce and Steven Vanderputten (Leiden and Boston, MA, forthcoming). Chronicon Beccense, PL 150, 648AB; and Sally N. Vaughn, St Anselm and the Handmaidens of God: A Study of Anselm's Correspondence with ...

The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West

Monasticism, in all of its variations, was a feature of almost every landscape in the medieval West. So ubiquitous were religious women and men throughout the Middle Ages that all medievalists encounter monasticism in their intellectual worlds. While there is enormous interest in medieval monasticism among Anglophone scholars, language is often a barrier to accessing some of the most important and groundbreaking research emerging from Europe. The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West offers a comprehensive treatment of medieval monasticism, from Late Antiquity to the end of the Middle Ages. The essays, specially commissioned for this volume and written by an international team of scholars, with contributors from Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States, cover a range of topics and themes and represent the most up-to-date discoveries on this topic.

Affective Meditation and the Invention of Medieval Compassion

... see Vaughn,St. Anselm and the Handmaidens of God. 45. Pächt, ''The Illustrations of St. Anselm's Prayers,'' reproduces the manuscript's images and makes the case for Admont 289's derivation from Matilda's exemplar.

Affective Meditation and the Invention of Medieval Compassion

Affective meditation on the Passion was one of the most popular literary genres of the high and later Middle Ages. Proliferating in a rich variety of forms, these lyrical, impassioned, script-like texts in Latin and the vernacular had a deceptively simple goal: to teach their readers how to feel. They were thus instrumental in shaping and sustaining the wide-scale shift in medieval Christian sensibility from fear of God to compassion for the suffering Christ. Affective Meditation and the Invention of Medieval Compassion advances a new narrative for this broad cultural change and the meditative writings that both generated and reflected it. Sarah McNamer locates women as agents in the creation of the earliest and most influential texts in the genre, from John of Fécamp's Libellus to the Meditationes Vitae Christi, thus challenging current paradigms that cast the compassionate affective mode as Anselmian or Franciscan in origin. The early development of the genre in women's practices had a powerful and lasting legacy. With special attention to Middle English texts, including Nicholas Love's Mirror and a wide range of Passion lyrics and laments, Affective Meditation and the Invention of Medieval Compassion illuminates how these scripts for the performance of prayer served to construct compassion itself as an intimate and feminine emotion. To feel compassion for Christ, in the private drama of the heart that these texts stage, was to feel like a woman. This was an assumption about emotion that proved historically consequential, McNamer demonstrates, as she traces some of its legal, ethical, and social functions in late medieval England.

The Care of Nuns

Sally Vaughn has studied Anselm's friendships with lay and religious women the most extensively; “St. Anselm and Women,” Haskins Society Journal 2 (1990): 83–93; Vaughn, St. Anselm and the Handmaidens of God (Turnhout: Brepols, 2002).

The Care of Nuns

In her ground-breaking new study, Katie Bugyis offers a new history of communities of Benedictine nuns in England from 900 to 1225. By applying innovative paleographical, codicological, and textual analyses to their surviving liturgical books, Bugyis recovers a treasure trove of unexamined evidence for understanding these women's lives and the liturgical and pastoral ministries they performed. She examines the duties and responsibilities of their chief monastic officers--abbesses, prioresses, cantors, and sacristans--highlighting three of the ministries vital to their practice-liturgically reading the gospel, hearing confessions, and offering intercessory prayers for others. Where previous scholarship has argued that the various reforms of the central Middle Ages effectively relegated nuns to complete dependency on the sacramental ministrations of priests, Bugyis shows that, in fact, these women continued to exercise primary control over their spiritual care. Essential to this argument is the discovery that the production of the liturgical books used in these communities was carried out by female scribes, copyists, correctors, and creators of texts, attesting to the agency and creativity that nuns exercised in the care they extended to themselves and those who sought their hospitality, counsel, instruction, healing, forgiveness, and intercession.

England in Europe

Review of St Anselm and the Handmaidens of God, by Sally N. Vaughn. EHR 119 (2004): 700–2. – “Scandinavian Influence in Norman Literature.” ANS 6 (1983): 107–21. – “Women and the Writing of History in the Early Middle Ages: The Case of ...

England in Europe


Addressing Women in Early Medieval Religious Texts

In a letter of 1104 or 1105, around the time that the Life was written, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Anselm, ... For more work on Anselm's letters to women, see Sally N. Vaughn, St Anselm and the Handmaidens of God: A Study of Anselm's ...

Addressing Women in Early Medieval Religious Texts

An investigation into texts specifically addressed to women sheds new light on female literary cultures.

Aelred the Peacemaker

Anselm's correspondence with Queen Edith (Matilda) indicates that she also attempted to mediate the ... Vaughn, Handmaidens of God, 244–46; R. W. Southern, St. Anselm and His Biographer: A Study in Monastic Life and Thought, 1059–c.

Aelred the Peacemaker

In addition to being a prolific spiritual writer and the abbot of the premier Cistercian monastery in northern England, Aelred of Rievaulx somehow found the time and the stamina to travel extensively throughout the Anglo-Norman realm, acting as a mediator, a problem solver, and an adviser to kings. His career spanned the troubled years of the civil war between King Stephen and the Empress Matilda and reached its zenith during the early years of the reign of Henry II. In this work, Jean Truax focuses on the public career of Aelred of Rievaulx, placing him in his historical context, deepening the reader’s understanding of his work, and casting additional light on his underappreciated role as politician, mediator, and negotiator outside his abbey’s walls.

Archbishops Ralph d Escures William of Corbeil and Theobald of Bec

"St. Anselm and the English Investiture Controversy Reconsidered," Journal of Medieval History 6/1 (Mar., 1980): 61-86. —, St. Anselm and the Handmaidens of God: A Study of Anselm's Correspondence with Women (Turnhout: Brepols, 2002).

Archbishops Ralph d Escures  William of Corbeil and Theobald of Bec

The first two archbishops of Canterbury after the Norman Conquest, Lanfranc and Anselm, were towering figures in the medieval church and the sixth archbishop, the martyred Thomas Becket, is perhaps the most famous figure ever to hold the office. In between these giants of the ecclesiastical world came three less noteworthy men: Ralph d'Escures, William of Corbeil, and Theobald of Bec. Jean Truax's volume in the Ashgate Archbishops of Canterbury Series uniquely examines the pontificates of these three minor archbishops. Presenting their biographies, careers, thought and works as a unified period, Truax highlights crucial developments in the English church during the period of the pontificates of these three archbishops, from the death of Anselm to Becket. The resurgent power of the papacy, a changed relationship between church and state and the expansion of archiepiscopal scope and power ensured that in 1162 Becket faced a very different world from the one that Anselm had left in 1109. Selected correspondence, newly translated chronicle accounts and the text and a discussion of the Canterbury forgeries complete the volume.

Inventing The Public Sphere

St. Anselm and the Handmaidens of God. A Study of Anselm's Correspondence with Women. Turnhout. Vehse, Otto 1929. Die Amtliche Propaganda in der Staatskunst Kaiser Friedrichs II. München. Verhulst, Adriaan 1995. Economic organisation.

Inventing The Public Sphere

Based on an analysis of the most important polemics of the Investiture Contest, this book outlines the characteristics of the public sphere during the Contest and how these characteristics relate to the particular arguments used by the polemical writers.

Stealing Obedience

The two letters (= Letters 168, 169 in Schmitt, Anselmi Opera Omnia, IV: 43–50) are not part of Anselm's own letter book collections. See Frölich, Letters, I: 43–4, and Sally N. Vaughn, St Anselm and the Handmaidens of God: A Study ...

Stealing Obedience

Narratives of monastic life in Anglo-Saxon England depict individuals as responsible agents in the assumption and performance of religious identities. To modern eyes, however, many of the ‘choices’ they make would actually appear to be compulsory. Stealing Obedience explores how a Christian notion of agent action – where freedom incurs responsibility – was a component of identity in the last hundred years of Anglo-Saxon England, and investigates where agency (in the modern sense) might be sought in these narratives. Katherine O'Brien O'Keeffe looks at Benedictine monasticism through the writings of Ælfric, Anselm, Osbern of Canterbury, and Goscelin of Saint-Bertin, as well as liturgy, canon and civil law, chronicle, dialogue, and hagiography, to analyse the practice of obedience in the monastic context. Stealing Obedience brings a highly original approach to the study of Anglo-Saxon narratives of obedience in the adoption of religious identity.

Hagiography and the History of Latin Christendom 500 1500

“Now in order that almighty God might show that He was the author of the favour which Anselm had found among men”, ... see S.N. Vaughn, St. Anselm and the Handmaidens of God: A Study of Anselm's Correspondence with Women (Utrecht ...

Hagiography and the History of Latin Christendom  500   1500

The twenty-one essays of Hagiography and the History of Latin Christendom, 500-1500 employ innovative methods to unlock the historical potential of hagiographical sources and reach new discoveries about the medieval world that extend well beyond the study of sanctity.