State Department Counterintelligence

DASS—Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Security DIA—Defense
Intelligence Agency DAO—Defense Attaché Office DOD—Department of Defense
DOJ—Department of Justice DRL—Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and
Labor, ...

State Department Counterintelligence

A veteran counterintelligence agent presents a revealing chronicle of his State Department investigations into intelligence leaks and spying on US soil. On October 7th, 1974, Robert D. Booth swore an oath to support and uphold the United States Constitution as a special agent of the State Department’s Office of Security. As a member of the Special Investigations Branch, he investigated numerous information leaks, losses of classified documents, and instances of espionage. Now, in State Department Counterintelligence, Booth reveals some of the most egregious leaks, spies, and lies that have adversely affected national security over his decades-long career. Booth tells the story of his pivotal role in three major counterespionage assignments as well as numerous investigations into unauthorized disclosures—including the unmasking of Fidel Castro’s most damaging US citizen spy. With the narrative style of a political thriller, Booth brings readers inside the real world of counterintelligence.

Counterintelligence Working Together

Counterintelligence   Working Together


Recent Counterintelligence Problems at Department of Energy Laboratories

On Tuesday, Jones called on Secretary of State Madeleine Albright to turn over
documents leading to the State Department's decision to make its anthrax
vaccination program voluntary. "I just have some very deep questions about the
vaccine ...

Recent Counterintelligence Problems at Department of Energy Laboratories


The Origins of FBI Counterintelligence

Examines the United States- efforts to create and project a strong counterintelligence capability both at home and abroad during the 1930s.

The Origins of FBI Counterintelligence

Examines the United States- efforts to create and project a strong counterintelligence capability both at home and abroad during the 1930s. Several federal agencies, governmental departments, and military divisions vied for that role before it was eventually handed to the FBI. The author, a former FBI agent, chronicles the evolution, achievements, and failure of that effort.

Encyclopedia of Intelligence and Counterintelligence

The net result was that by the fall of 1917, the Cheka under Feliks Dzerzhinsky
was reading Kalamatiano's intelligence reports before the Department of State in
Washington, D.C., received them. In the late summer of 1918, President
Woodrow ...

Encyclopedia of Intelligence and Counterintelligence

From references to secret agents in The Art of War in 400 B.C.E. to the Bush administration's ongoing War on Terrorism, espionage has always been an essential part of state security policies. This illustrated encyclopedia traces the fascinating stories of spies, intelligence, and counterintelligence throughout history, both internationally and in the United States. Written specifically for students and general readers by scholars, former intelligence officers, and other experts, Encyclopedia of Intelligence and Counterintelligence provides a unique background perspective for viewing history and current events. In easy-to-understand, non-technical language, it explains how espionage works as a function of national policy; traces the roots of national security; profiles key intelligence leaders, agents, and double-agents; discusses intelligence concepts and techniques; and profiles the security organizations and intelligence history and policies of nations around the world. As a special feature, the set also includes forewords by former CIA Director Robert M. Gates and former KGB Major General Oleg Kalugin that help clarify the evolution of intelligence and counterintelligence and their crucial roles in world affairs today.

Congressional Serial Set

The House and Senate Intelligence Committees have highlighted serious
deficiencies in current counterintelligence and security ... Continued
enhancements to the State Department Counterintelligence Staff are essential for
this purpose .

Congressional Serial Set


Departments of Commerce Justice State the Judiciary and Related Agencies Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1986 Arms Control and Disarmament Agency

Question : Why aren ' t the State Department ' s counter intelligence needs
handled by the Justice Department ? Answer : The Justice Department , as a
domestic agency , is unable to handle our counterintelligence needs on a world -
wide ...

Departments of Commerce  Justice  State  the Judiciary  and Related Agencies Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1986  Arms Control and Disarmament Agency


Dirty Tricks Or Trump Cards

The Office of Foreign Missions (OFM) was established in the Department of State,
headed by James Nolan, a former senior FBI counterintelligence manager. His
arrival was not generally welcomed by State Department diplomats, and upon ...

Dirty Tricks Or Trump Cards

Contrary to popular misconceptions and public branding as "dirty tricks," covert action and counterintelligence can have considerable value. Democracies, while wary of these instruments, have benefited significantly from their use, saving lives, treasure, and gaining strategic advantage. As liberal democracies confront the post-Cold War mix of rogue states and non-state actors, such as criminals and terrorists, and weapons of mass destruction and mass disruption, these clandestine arts may prove to be important tools of statecraft, and perhaps trump cards in the twenty-first century. Godson defines covert action as influencing events in other parts of the world without attribution, and counterintelligence as identifying, neutralizing, and exploiting the secret activities of others. Together they provide the capability to resist manipulation and control others to advantage. Counterintelligence protects U.S. military, technological, and diplomatic secrets and turns adversary intelligence to U.S. advantage. Covert action enables the United States to weaken adversaries and to assist allies who may be hampered by open acknowledgment of foreign support. Drawing on contemporary and historical literature, broad-ranging contacts with senior intelligence officials in many countries, as well as his own research and experience as a longtime consultant to the U.S. government, Godson traces the history of U.S. covert action and counterintelligence since 1945, showing that covert action works well when it is part of a well-coordinated policy and when policy makers are committed to succeeding in the long-term. Godson argues that the best counterintelligence is an offensive defense. His exposition of the essential theoretical foundations of both covert action and counterintelligence, supported by historical examples, lays out the ideal conditions for their use, as well as demonstrating why they are so difficult to attain. This book will be of interest to students and general readers interested in political science, national security, foreign policy, and military policy. Roy Godson is professor of government at Georgetown University in Washington D.C. Through his leadership of the Academic Consortium for the Study of Intelligence he helped institutionalize the teaching of intelligence in colleges and universities throughout the English-speaking world. "...if you want to understand how the whole thing works at Washington level, and to have an idea of what George W. Bush is hearing from his adviser, then reading this will prove quicker and cheaper than setting up your spy network."-Daily Telegram

Vaults Mirrors and Masks

Vaults, Mirrors, and Masks skillfully reveals that robust counterintelligence is vital to ensuring America's security.

Vaults  Mirrors  and Masks

Decision makers matching wits with an adversary want intelligence—good, relevant information to help them win. Intelligence can gain these advantages through directed research and analysis, agile collection, and the timely use of guile and theft. Counterintelligence is the art and practice of defeating these endeavors. Its purpose is the same as that of positive intelligence—to gain advantage—but it does so by exploiting, disrupting, denying, or manipulating the intelligence activities of others. The tools of counterintelligence include security systems, deception, and disguise: vaults, mirrors, and masks. In one indispensable volume, top practitioners and scholars in the field explain the importance of counterintelligence today and explore the causes of—and practical solutions for—U.S. counterintelligence weaknesses. These experts stress the importance of developing a sound strategic vision in order to improve U.S. counterintelligence and emphasize the challenges posed by technological change, confused purposes, political culture, and bureaucratic rigidity. Vaults, Mirrors, and Masks skillfully reveals that robust counterintelligence is vital to ensuring America's security. Published in cooperation with the Center for Peace and Security Studies and the George T. Kalaris Memorial Fund, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University.

Historical Dictionary of Chinese Intelligence

The Historical Dictionary of Chinese Intelligence covers the history of Chinese Intelligence from 400 B.C. to modern times. This is done through a chronology, an introductory essay, an extensive bibliography, and an index.

Historical Dictionary of Chinese Intelligence

The Historical Dictionary of Chinese Intelligence covers the history of Chinese Intelligence from 400 B.C. to modern times. This is done through a chronology, an introductory essay, an extensive bibliography, and an index. The dictionary section has over 400 cross-referenced entries on the agencies and agents, the operations and equipment, the tradecraft and jargon, and many of the countries involved. This book is an excellent access point for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about Chinese Intelligence.

Strategic Intelligence Counterintelligence and counterterrorism defending the nation against hostile forces

22 The Bentley , Rosenberg , and Hall cases were not the FBI ' s sole
counterintelligence failures . Another case , highly publicized during the Cold
War era , involved former State Department employee Alger Hiss , indicted in
December 1948 ...

Strategic Intelligence  Counterintelligence and counterterrorism   defending the nation against hostile forces

While several fine texts on intelligence have been published over the past decade, there is no complementary set of volumes that addresses the subject in a comprehensive manner for the general reader. This major set explains how the sixteen major U.S. intelligence agencies operate, how they collect information from around the world, the problems they face in providing further insight into this "raw" information through the techniques of analysis, and the difficulties that accompany the dissemination of intelligence to policymakers in a timely manner.

United States Code Congressional and Administrative News

STUDY OF TECHNICAL SECURITY AND COUNTERINTELLIGENCE
CAPABILITIES. (a) STUDY BY INSPECTOR GENERAL.-Not later than 30 days
after the date of enactment of this Act, the Inspector General of the Department of
State shall ...

United States Code Congressional and Administrative News

Contains laws, legislative history, administrative regulations, lists of committees, proclamations, executive messages and orders.

Intelligence and the National Security Strategist

—Isaiah 48: 1 8 The need for counterintelligence (CI) has not gone away, nor is it
likely to. The end of the Cold ... It was the SVRR that planted a listening device in
a conference room of the State Department in Washington in the summer of 1 ...

Intelligence and the National Security Strategist

Intelligence and the National Security Strategist: Enduring Issues and Challenges presents students with a useful anthology of published articles from diverse sources as well as original contributions to the study of intelligence. The collection includes classic perspectives from the history of warfare, views on the evolution of U.S. intelligence, and studies on the delicate balance between the need for information-gathering and the values of democratic societies. It also includes succinct discussions of complex issues facing the Intelligence Community, such as the challenges of technical and clandestine collection, the proliferation of open sources, the problems of deception and denial operations, and the interaction between the Intelligence Community and the military. Several timely chapters examine the role of the intelligence analyst in support of the national security policymaker. Rounding out the volume are appendices on the legislative underpinnings of our national intelligence apparatus.

The journal of national security law

PDD-24 corrected this and established an Issue Coordinator for
Counterintelligence under the DCI's Needs Process. ... for counterintelligence
issues within the Department of Defense, a representative from the State
Department's INR [Bureau ...

The journal of national security law


Oswald and the CIA

... “his wife indicated that he had CIC [Counterintelligence Corps] connections.”
Mrs. Dutkanicz told State Department officials some intriguing details about her
husband: In an interview at the American Embassy Moscow on 5 December 1961
 ...

Oswald and the CIA

From the acclaimed author of JFK and Vietnam comes a book that uncovers the government's role in the Kennedy assassination more clearly than any previous inquiry. What was the extent of the CIA's involvement with Lee Harvey Oswald? Why was Oswald's file tampered with before the assassination of John F. Kennedy? And why did significant documents from that file mysteriously disappear? Oswald and the CIA answers these questions, not with theories, but with information from the primary sources themselves—ex-agents, officials, and secret records. To look at the Oswald file is to look at the most sensitive CIA operation of the Cold War. The story is as alarming as it is tragic; the lies and manipulations it reveals led directly to Kennedy's murder. Oswald and the CIA is a gripping journey to the darkest corners of the CIA.

Current News

The whole C.I. ( counterintelligence ) system has proved to be inferior to the
excellence of its component parts , ” they write . Mr. Kalaris was ... On Capitol Hill
, House and Senate negotiators are working on a State Department
appropriations ...

Current News


Law Enforcement Counterintelligence

... 180 PIUs & police intelligence units , 75 power , 180 sustained efforts at , 186
units in a single department not , 186 ... 106 routine crime , 107 undesirables ,
106 Soviet Active Measures , Interdepartmental Working Group on ( State Dept. )
 ...

Law Enforcement Counterintelligence


Foundations of Homeland Security

Participate with the Department of State in overtly collecting information with
respect to foreign energy matters; b. ... Within the United States conduct
counterintelligence and coordinate counterintelligence activities of otheragencies
withinthe ...

Foundations of Homeland Security

This book is the complete guide to understanding the structure of homeland security – its underlying law and policy. Created from a broad and in depth, yet edited collection of statutes, policy papers, presidential directives, and other documents, it cultivates a detailed understanding of the foundations of homeland security. It is arranged in a topic-by-topic format structured to include only the documents and statues that affect a particular subject, making for much easier understanding. Thus, the chapter on FEMA contains only the portions of the statutes and other documents that relate to FEMA. There are twenty-five topic areas. It contains hundreds of end notes, references, and suggestions for further study. This book offers important legal guidance that students, law enforcement officers, lawyers, and other homeland security professionals need to accurately interpret, understand, and apply homeland security policy. The Introduction provides an in-depth overview of the subject of homeland security and includes a discussion of what is homeland security, definitions of homeland security and terrorism, what is homeland security law, its development, and what is a homeland security curriculum. There are contributing chapters about homeland security in Europe, and homeland security in China and Japan.

State Department

... has a increased its focus on security awareness training to employees
traveling outside of the official State compound. ... upgraded its domestic
technical and procedural security programs and strengthened its
counterintelligence program.

State Department

State Department's (State) Bureau of Diplomatic Security (DS) is responsible for the protection of people, information, and property at over 400 foreign missions and domestic locations. DS must be prepared to counter threats such as crime, espionage, and passport fraud, technological intrusions, political violence, and terrorism. This report assesses: (1) how DS's mission has evolved since 1998; (2) how its resources have changed over the last 10 years; and (3) the challenges it faces in conducting its missions. The auditor analyzed DS data; reviewed relevant documents; and interviewed officials at several domestic facilities and 18 international missions. Includes recommendations. Charts and tables.