Modernism and Still Life

VIBRATION AND LIFEHWRITING a In Woolf's essay, 'The Death of the Moth', the fragile life of the moth 'fluttering from side to side', represents a conduit for 'a fibre, very thin but pure, of the enormous energy of the world'.67 As we ...

Modernism and Still Life

Explores the 'still life spirit' in modern painting, prose, dance, sculpture and poetryChallenges the conventional positioning of still life a 'minor' genre in art historyProposes a radical alternative to narratives of modernism that privilege speed and motion by revealing forms of stillness and still life at the heart of modern literature and visual cultureProvides the first study of still life to consider the genre across modern literature, visual cultures and danceUncovers connections and cultural exchange between networks of European and American artists including the Bloomsbury Group and Wallace StevensThe late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries have been characterised as the 'age of speed' but they also witnessed a reanimation of still life across different art forms. This book takes an original approach to still life in modern literature and the visual arts by examining the potential for movement and transformation in the idea of stillness and the ordinary. It ranges widely in its material, taking Czanne and literary responses to his still life painting as its point of departure. It investigates constellations of writers, visual artists and dancers including D. H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, David Jones, Winifred Nicholson, Wallace Stevens, and lesser-known figures including Charles Mauron and Margaret Morris. Claudia Tobin reveals that at the heart of modern art were forms of stillness that were intimately bound up with movement: the still life emerges charged with animation, vibration and rhythm; an unstable medium, unexpectedly vital and well suited to the expression of modern concerns.

You Have to Say Something

BUDDHISM, LIFE AND DEATH are not separate; they walk as one. Life is death ... That's why we have to meditate on the problem of life and death every day, year after year. ... In other words, life is still life, and death is still death.

You Have to Say Something

Dainin Katagiri (1928–1990) was a central figure in the transmission of Zen in America. His first book, Returning to Silence, emphasized the need to return to our original, enlightened state of being, and became one of the classics of Zen in America. In You Have to Say Something, selections from his talks have been collected to address another key theme of Katagiri's teaching: that of bringing Zen insight to bear on our everyday experience. "To live life fully," Katagiri says, "means to take care of your life day by day, moment to moment, right here, right now." To do this, he teaches, we must plunge into our life completely, bringing to it the same wholeheartedness that is required in Zen meditation. When we approach life in this way, every activity—everything we do, everything we say—becomes an opportunity for manifesting our own innate wisdom. With extraordinary freshness and immediacy, Katagiri shows the reader how this wisdom not only enlivens our spiritual practice but can help make our life a rich, seamless whole.

The Zen Master s Dance

Thus, there is getting out of life and death and entering right into life and death, both of which are perfectly penetrating the ... However, from another perspective, there is still life and death, and this life and death is your life; ...

The Zen Master s Dance

Zen Master's Dance makes some of Zen’s subtlest teaching deeply personal and freshly accessible. Eihei Dogen—the thirteenth-century Japanese Zen Master of peerless depth and subtlety—heard the music of the universe that sounds as all events and places, people, things, and spaces. He experienced reality as a great dance moving through time, coming to life in the thoughts and acts of all beings. It is a most special dance, the dance that the whole of reality is dancing, with nothing left out. All beings are dancing, and reality is dancing as all beings. In The Zen Master’s Dance, Jundo Cohen takes us deep into the mind of Master Dogen—and shows us how to join in the great and intimate dance of the universe. Through fresh translations and sparkling teaching, Cohen opens up for us a new way to read one of Buddhism’s most remarkable spiritual geniuses.

Translation and the Arts in Modern France

20 With photography, death imprints itself on the surface of the image, if only because photography displaces the issue of ... Even in the most mannerist and de-realized of still-lifes— such as American artist Zachary Zavislak's—the ...

Translation and the Arts in Modern France

Translation and the Arts in Modern France sits at the intersection of transposition, translation, and ekphrasis, finding resonances in these areas across periods, places, and forms. Within these contributions, questions of colonization, subjugation, migration, and exile connect Benin to Brittany, and political philosophy to the sentimental novel and to film. Focusing on cultural production from 1830 to the present and privileging French culture, the contributors explore interactions with other cultures, countries, and continents, often explicitly equating intercultural permeability with representational exchange. In doing so, the book exposes the extent to which moving between media and codes—the very process of translation and transposition—is a defining aspect of creativity across time, space, and disciplines.

Death and Resurrection in Art

Arranged on a tabletop, a composition of natural or manmade elements prompts a meditation on life, death, and the ultimate significance of existence. Still Life Name The Italian name for the genre—natura morta, or “dead nature”—began as ...

Death and Resurrection in Art

"This book will examine the iconography of death as well as that of its symbolic opposite - resurrection and rebirth."-Introduction.

The Cinema of Takeshi Kitano

In its undulating, circular, chaotic heartbeat, life and death wrap one another, bathed in pathos, and the possibilities that pathos brings. In a Kitano film, one has to understand that life is a type of death, and that death is still- ...

The Cinema of Takeshi Kitano

The Cinema of Takeshi Kitano: Flowering Blood is a detailed aesthetic, Deleuzian, and phenomenological exploration of Japan’s finest currently-working film director, performer, and celebrity. The volume uniquely explores Kitano’s oeuvre through the tropes of stillness and movement, becoming animal, melancholy and loss, intensity, schizophrenia, and radical alterity; and through the aesthetic temperatures of color, light, camera movement, performance and urban and oceanic space. In this highly original monograph, all of Kitano’s films are given due consideration, including A Scene at the Sea (1991), Sonatine (1993), Dolls (2002), and Outrage (2010).

The Decision of Desire

Death is not simply the end of life but the dead moment of life, in the sense from painting of la nature morte, or better, “a still life.” A still life is, we know, irreducible to the structure of its lines and colors, and refers to ...

The Decision of Desire

A unique rereading of Lacan’s theory of desire and its link to masochism, joy, mysticism, death, and feminine jouissance Of all of Lacan’s reconceptualizations of Freudian psychoanalytic discourse, the most misunderstood are those concerning human beings’ relation to the unconscious play of desire and the neurosis stemming from their attachment to the phallic function. An interpretive tour de force that engages works by surrealists such as André Breton, canonical writers like William Faulkner and James Joyce, and the philosophers Jean-Paul Sartre, Emmanuel Levinas, and Baruch Spinoza, The Decision of Desire is groundbreaking in its proposal that each of us can seek out and reimagine our relation to the infinite aporias of desire and thereby detach from its destructive, repetitive forms in favor of joy and affirmation. Providing insight to the lay reader of psychoanalytic theory as much as to practicing psychoanalysts, The Decision of Desire is a bold reengagement with the legacy of the notion of desire within psychoanalysis and the quandary of how to assume responsibility for desires. For if desire is always already that of the Other and the unconscious, and also a decision that escapes our consciousness of ourselves, how can we assume an ethical relation to it that avoids the vicious circle of disappointment, neurosis, and destruction? Such is the decision of desire attempted within Silvia Lippi’s profound development of a contemporary psychoanalytic thought.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

... RG6327 Still - life in art UF Infants ( Stillborn ) NT Still - life painting Late fetal death Still - life painting ... Perinatal death Still - life in art Stillbirth in animals ( May Subd Geog ) NT Trompe l'oeil painting UF Still ...

Library of Congress Subject Headings


Reading Rembrandt

Description is supposed to be the mode that differentiates still states from narrative events, and outer from inner. In a way we can say it differentiates death from life. Whereas narration represents events, including inner events like ...

Reading Rembrandt

In Reading Rembrandt: Beyond the Word-Image Opposition onderzoekt Mieke Bal de toepasbaarheid van een interdisciplinaire methodiek voor beeldende kunst en literatuur. Door de bestudering van een reeks van kunstanalyses van de werken van "Rembrandt" - van hedendaagse kunstkritieken tot de verschillende wijzen waarop men vroeger de werken van Rembran

The Fiction of A S Byatt

Although Sorensen spends considerable time tracing the range of deaths within Byatt's fiction, her essay focuses on the accidental death of Stephanie in Still Life, which she claims is among Byatt's 'greatest written achievements'.61 ...

The Fiction of A S  Byatt

This Guide examines the key critical responses to Byatt's fiction (both her novels and short stories) tracing the wider debates about realism, postmodernism and feminism with which they engage. The Guide also explores the themes which are central to Byatt's work, such as her depiction of writer-figures and her conception of artistic vision.

Derrida and Autobiography

The ' steep path to life ' plays out what Derrida calls the ' logic of obsequence ' , return within the death of the other ... but a passing in the other's death , and so mourning for what is still life in which the other fructifies .

Derrida and Autobiography

A reading of the philosophy of Jacques Derrida and an investigation of theories of autobiography.

Critical Moral Liberalism

Life in prison is still life , however unpleasant . In contrast , the death penalty does not just threaten to make life unpleasant — it threatens to take life altogether . This difference is perceived by those affected .

Critical Moral Liberalism

In this important book, Jeffrey Reiman responds to recent assaults on liberal theory by proposing a 'critical moral liberalism.' It is liberal in maintaining the emphasis of classical liberalism on individual freedom, moral in adhering to a distinctive vision of the good life rather than professing neutrality, and critical in taking seriously the objection-raised by feminists and Marxists, among others-that liberal theories often serve as ideological cover for oppression of one group by others. Critical moral liberalism has a conception of ideology, and resources for testing the suspicion that arrangements that look free are really oppressive. Reiman sets forth the basic arguments for the liberal moral obligation to maximize people's ability to govern their own lives, and for the conception of the good life that goes with this. He considers and answers objections to the liberal project, and defends liberal conceptions of privacy, moral virtue, economic justice, and Constitutional interpretation. Reiman then takes up specific policy issues, among them abortion, infanticide, euthanasia, moral education, capital punishment, and threats to privacy from modern information technology. Critical Moral Liberalism will be of interest to scholars and students of ethics, social and political philosophy, political theory, and public policy.

Slow Movies

Perhaps reflecting this emphasis, Still Life's final scene highlights the individual more than the group. The scene begins with Sanming leading his ... In a sense, individuality emerges where life and death converge in Still Life.

Slow Movies

"In all film there is the desire to capture the motion of life, to refuse immobility," Agnes Varda has noted. But to capture the reality of human experience, cinema must fasten on stillness and inaction as much as motion. Slow Movies investigates movies by acclaimed international directors who in the past three decades have challenged mainstream cinema's reliance on motion and action. More than other realist art cinema, slow movies by Lisandro Alonso, Nuri Bilge Ceylan, Pedro Costa, Jia Zhang-ke, Abbas Kiarostami, Cristian Mungiu, Alexander Sokurov, Bela Tarr, Gus Van Sant and others radically adhere to space-times in which emotion is repressed along with motion; editing and dialogue yield to stasis and contemplation; action surrenders to emptiness if not death.

The Conception of Eternal Life With Special Reference to the Gospel of St John

It is true; we cannot fairly argue from the physical process of the seed to the spiritual process of life. Still, it is an illustrative and suggestive metaphor; it brings home to the mind that physical death is not a determining factor ...

The Conception of Eternal Life  With Special Reference to the Gospel of St  John

The Very Reverend Dr. Milan G. Popovich was born in Banat, Serbia, in 1896 and emigrated to the United States in the late 1920s. With degrees from Oxford University and the University of Pittsburgh, Father Popovich was a pillar of the Serbian Orthodox Church. He was a priest, educator, builder, and musician. The industry and determination of the late Father Popovich are impressed deeply in the memories of the Orthodox faithful. Although well known among many of the Serbian Orthodox Church, he is far less known outside that sector. The Conception of Eternal Life is an in-depth look at spirituality and eternal life written by Father Popovich in 1922, while he was a young student of theology at Oxford University. You will learn how Father Popovich's experiences at Oxford helped formulate his faith. Father Popovich died in 1975, but his legacy continues. The Conception of Eternal Life can strengthen the faith of all who believe in God.

LOVE SONNETS On the Threshold of Life Death and Rebirth

Sonnet 30: On the lawn at Saint Agnes' Convent Lying in grass quilts on wide fields of play I stare at clouds chaotic, silent mimes that ape still life below where children lay in short repose, like me, these quiet times, angelic sylphs ...

LOVE SONNETS  On the Threshold of Life  Death and Rebirth


The French Connections of Jacques Derrida

... seminar on " Life Death " ( La vie la mort ) , part of which was included in " To Speculateon Freud " ( cf. P ... , 52 ) . The affinities of this pulsating tension between life and death with painting's so - called " still life ...

The French Connections of Jacques Derrida

Addresses for the first time the issue of Derrida's relation to French poetics, writing, thought, and culture.

Understanding Sharon Olds

“At moments almost thinking of her,” the daughter reflects, “I was moving through the still life museum.” This is symbolic of the artist who memorializes lifeindeath, even as literal life and death compete outside the frame: as the ...

Understanding Sharon Olds

Understanding Sharon Olds explores this Pulitzer Prize–winning poet’s major themes, characters, life, and career, including her often-controversial portrayals of family dysfunction, sexuality, and violence against women. In this first book dedicated entirely to the poetry of Sharon Olds, Russell Brickey examines how Olds approaches these difficult and complex topics with pathos and intimate, sometimes provocatively private, details through poetry that not all her critics appreciate. Olds has never shied away from difficult subject matter. Her first award-winning book, Satan Says, is a feminist exploration of gender politics and adolescent discovery. The Father comprises a book-length elegy about cancer. Stag’s Leap, Olds’s Pulitzer Prize–winning volume, is a surprisingly tender look at divorce in modern American culture. Extremely personal, her poems often deal with the victories and contradictions of being a woman in the United States during a time when the country is often involved in racial upheavals and military conflicts overseas. She investigates the victories and contradictions of being a wife and mother during the era of feminism, as one of our most honest, most overt poets of female sexuality and its relationship to family life and its place within the history of humanity. Brickey organizes each chapter around a theme or a persona within Olds’s cast of characters. These include poems dedicated to mothers, fathers, children, and the arc of history. Through his close readings, Brickey shows how and where Olds has expanded the tradition of confessional poetry (literature that deals with psychology, family, love, and sexuality), a term Olds disdains but nevertheless expanded into commentary about the human condition in all its paradoxes.

Phantasmal Media

Yep, I've been thinking about life and death a lot lately. ... is well known in the arts; you probably have seen a memento mori artwork in the form of a still life featuring a lush flower arrangement next to an inert skull.

Phantasmal Media

An argument that great expressive power of computational media arises from the construction of phantasms—blends of cultural ideas and sensory imagination. In Phantasmal Media, D. Fox Harrell considers the expressive power of computational media. He argues, forcefully and persuasively, that the great expressive potential of computational media comes from the ability to construct and reveal phantasms—blends of cultural ideas and sensory imagination. These ubiquitous and often-unseen phantasms—cognitive phenomena that include sense of self, metaphors, social categories, narrative, and poetic thinking—influence almost all our everyday experiences. Harrell offers an approach for understanding and designing computational systems that have the power to evoke these phantasms, paying special attention to the exposure of oppressive phantasms and the creation of empowering ones. He argues for the importance of cultural content, diverse worldviews, and social values in computing. The expressive power of phantasms is not purely aesthetic, he contends; phantasmal media can express and construct the types of meaning central to the human condition. Harrell discusses, among other topics, the phantasm as an orienting perspective for developers; expressive epistemologies, or data structures based on subjective human worldviews; morphic semiotics (building on the computer scientist Joseph Goguen's theory of algebraic semiotics); cultural phantasms that influence consensus and reveal other perspectives; computing systems based on cultural models; interaction and expression; and the ways that real-world information is mapped onto, and instantiated by, computational data structures. The concept of phantasmal media, Harrell argues, offers new possibilities for using the computer to understand and improve the human condition through the human capacity to imagine.

Symbols in Life and Art

cyclical themes of life and death was limited or even primarily embodied in his landscape depictions , since they are equally recurrent with paintings devoted to either still life or figural subjects . Good examples of the former genre ...

Symbols in Life and Art

Northrop Frye describes the way symbols operate as media of exchange in literature, drawing examples from English literature in difference periods. Eva Kushner examines the increased freedom on expression possible to Renaissance poets because of the availability of a wider range of symbols. Poet and literary historian Douglas Jones probes the use of the railway as a distinctive symbol of both unity and alienation for English Canadians. Abraham Moles analyses the social impact of "dynamic myths" on social changes which break with established traditions. Bogomila Welsh-Ovcharov discusses the function of symbols in the art of Van Gogh. James Leith examines the role of symbols in revolutionary movements, in particular the adaptation of the ancient symbol of the equilateral triangle. Anthony Storr discusses the vital role of symbols in the search for a sense of unity in life. Wilfred Cantwell-Smith considers various world religions as symbolic efforts to give ultimate meaning to life. In conclusion, Norman Mackenzie reflects on all the essays, drawing on his own command of modern literature and culture.

Still Life

The Body Economic: Life, Death, and Sensation in the Political Economy of the Victorian Novel. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2006. Gallagher, Catherine. “Formalism and Time.” MLQ 61.1 (2000): 229–51. Gallagher, Catherine.

Still Life

Still Life: Suspended Development in the Victorian Novel rethinks the nineteenth-century aesthetics of agency through the Victorian novel's fascination with states of reverie, trance, and sleep. These states challenge contemporary scientific and philosophical accounts of the perfectibility of the self, which privileged reflective self-awareness. In dialogue with the field of literature and science studies and affect studies, this book shows how Victorian writers used narrative form to respond to the analytical practices and knowledge production of those other disciplines. Drawing upon canonical texts--by Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, George Meredith, and Thomas Hardy--Still Life contends that depictions of non-purposive perceptual experience suspend the processes of self-cultivation (Bildung) central to Victorian aesthetics, science, psychology, and political theory, as well as most critical accounts of the novel form. Departing from the values of individual cultivation and moral revelation associated with the genre, these writers offer an affective framework for understanding the subtly non-instrumental powers of narrative. Victorian novels ostensibly working within the parameters of the Bildungsroman are suspended by moments of "still life": a decentered lyricism associated with states of diminished consciousness. They use this style to narrate what should be unnarratable: experiences not dependent on reflective consciousness, which express a distinctive ambivalence toward dominant developmental frameworks of individual self-culture. "