Stolen Daughters Virgin Mothers

A study of the social history and cultural significance of the sisterhoods that sprang up in Victorian Britain, examining the lives of women who pushed the boundaries of what women could do within the Anglican Church and paved the way for ...

Stolen Daughters  Virgin Mothers

A study of the social history and cultural significance of the sisterhoods that sprang up in Victorian Britain, examining the lives of women who pushed the boundaries of what women could do within the Anglican Church and paved the way for modern social workers. So successful were they in organizing and recruiting that they threatened to undermine the ideal of domestic life for women.

Slum Travelers

Mother Kate , who remained in Haggerston for the rest of her life , was deeply involved in the material struggles of the ... See also Susan Munn , Stolen Daughters , Virgin Mothers : Anglican Sisterhoods in Victorian Britain ( London ...

Slum Travelers

Ellen Ross has collected impressions from some of the half a million women involved in philanthropy by the 1890s, most of them active in the London slums. The contributors include Sylvia Pankhurst and Beatrice Webb, as well as many more less well known figures.

Say Little Do Much

Mumm, Stolen Daughters, Virgin Mothers, 137-65. The fluidity of the Anglican sisterhoods in the nineteenth century mirrors that of the Catholic sisterhoods in the first few decades of the century. As a new and growing phenomenon the ...

Say Little  Do Much

In the nineteenth century, more than a third of American hospitals were established and run by women with religious vocations. In Say Little, Do Much, Sioban Nelson casts light on the work of these women's religious communities. According to Nelson, the popular view that nursing invented itself in the second half of the nineteenth century is historically inaccurate and dismissive of the major advances in the care of the sick as a serious and skilled activity, an activity that originated in seventeenth-century France with Vincent de Paul's Daughters of Charity. In this comparative, contextual, and critical work, Nelson demonstrates how modern nursing developed from the complex interplay of the Catholic emancipation in Britain and Ireland, the resurgence of the Irish Church, the Irish diaspora, and the mass migrations of the German, Italian, and Polish Catholic communities to the previously Protestant strongholds of North America and mainland Britain. In particular, Nelson follows the nursing Daughters of Charity through the French Revolution and the Second Empire, documenting the relationship that developed between the French nursing orders and the Irish Catholic Church during this period. This relationship, she argues, was to have major significance for the development of nursing in the English-speaking world.

Women Gender and Religious Cultures in Britain 1800 1940

14 SusanMumm, Stolen Daughters, Virgin Mothers: AnglicanSisterhoods in Victorian Britain (London: Leicester University Press, 1998),p.6. 15See Thomas J. Williams, Priscilla Lydia Sellon:The Restorer afterThree Centuries of the Religious ...

Women  Gender and Religious Cultures in Britain  1800   1940

This volume is the first comprehensive overview of women, gender and religious change in modern Britain spanning from the evangelical revival of the early 1800s to interwar debates over women’s roles and ministry. This collection of pieces by key scholars combines cross-disciplinary insights from history, gender studies, theology, literature, religious studies, sexuality and postcolonial studies. The book takes a thematic approach, providing students and scholars with a clear and comparative examination of ten significant areas of cultural activity that both shaped, and were shaped by women’s religious beliefs and practices: family life, literary and theological discourses, philanthropic networks, sisterhoods and deaconess institutions, revivals and preaching ministry, missionary organisations, national and transnational political reform networks, sexual ideas and practices, feminist communities, and alternative spiritual traditions. Together, the volume challenges widely-held truisms about the increasingly private and domesticated nature of faith, the feminisation of religion and the relationship between secularisation and modern life. Including case studies, further reading lists, and a survey of the existing scholarship, and with a British rather than Anglo-centric approach, this is an ideal book for anyone interested in women's religious experiences across the nineteeth and twentieth centuries.

A Foreign and Wicked Institution

Mumm, Stolen Daughters, Virgin Mothers, 224–25. 3. For biographies of Emily Ayckbowm, see Anonymous, Emily H. E. Ackbowm; and Anonymous, A Valiant Victorian. The Sisters of the Church still exist today. The community is involved in ...

A Foreign and Wicked Institution

Many in Victorian England harbored deep suspicion of convent life. In addition to looking at anti-Catholicism and the fear of both Anglican and Catholic sisterhoods that were established during the nineteenth century, this work explores the prejudice that existed against women in Victorian England who joined sisterhoods and worked in orphanages and in education and were comitted to social work among the urban poor. Women, according to some of these critics, should remain passive in matters of religion. Nuns, however, did play an important role in many areas of life in nineteenth-century England and faced hostility from many who felt threatened and challenged by members of female religious orders. The accomplishments of the nineteenth-century nuns and the opposition they overcame should serve as both an example and encouragement to all men and women committed to the Gospel.

Victorians and the Virgin Mary

120 Susan Mumm, Stolen daughters, virgin mothers: Anglican sisterhoods in Victorian Britain (London and New York: Leicester University Press, 1999), p. 3. 121 While still an Anglican, Newman praised convents as 'institutions which give ...

Victorians and the Virgin Mary

This interdisciplinary study of competing representations of the Virgin Mary examines how anxieties about religious and gender identities intersected to create public controversies that, whilst ostensibly about theology and liturgy, were also attempts to define the role and nature of women. Drawing on a variety of sources, this book seeks to revise our understanding of the Victorian religious landscape, both retrieving Catholics from the cultural margins to which they are usually relegated, and calling for a reassessment of the Protestant attitude to the feminine ideal. This book will be useful to advanced students and scholars in a variety of disciplines including history, religious studies, Victorian studies, women’s history and gender studies.

Catholic Sensationalism and Victorian Literature

15 Frances Power Cobbe, Essays on the Pursuits of Women, 1863; quoted in Susan Mumm, Stolen Daughters, Virgin Mothers: Anglican Sisterhoods in Victorian Britain (London and New York: Leicester University Press, 1999), p. 63.

Catholic Sensationalism and Victorian Literature

Catholic Sensationalism and Victorian Literature offers a highly original examination of Victorian sensationalism through the exploration of popular literary representations of Roman Catholicism, that exotic, corrupt religious 'Other' which is inscribed as the implacable anti-English enemy. The book demonstrates how new understandings of cultural tensions of the period are gained through the association of Roman Catholicism with secular fears of crime, sex and violence, rather than with theological 'excesses' and doctrinal 'superstitions'.

The Cowley Fathers

23 Susan Mumm, Stolen Daughters, Virgin Mothers: Anglican Sisterhoods in Victorian Britain, Leicester University Press (1999) 6; Thomas Jay Williams & Allan Walter Campbell, The Park Village Sisterhood, London: SPCK (1965).

The Cowley Fathers

The Society of St John the Evangelist, otherwise known as the Cowley Fathers, was the first men’s religious order to be founded in the Church of England since the Reformation, as a result of the spread and influence of the Oxford Movement and its Anglo-Catholic spirituality in the 19th century. Established in Oxford in 1866, its charismatic founder, Richard Meux Benson worked closely with American priests and just four years later a congregation was founded in Massachusetts that flourishes to this day. The charism of the order embraced high regard of theology with practical service, fostered by an emphasis on prayer and personal holiness. Cowley, a poor and rapidly expanding village on the outskirts of Oxford, provided ample opportunity for service. At its height, the English congregation had houses in Oxford (now St Stephen’s House) and Westminster where figures such as C S Lewis sought spiritual direction. Now no longer operating as a community in Britain, this definitive and comprehensive history records its significant contribution to Anglicanism then and now.

Protestant Communalism in the Trans Atlantic World 1650 1850

78Susan Mumm, Stolen Daughters, Virgin Mothers: Anglican Sisterhoods in Victorian Britain (London: Leicester University Press, 1999), p. 3. 79Allchin, Silent Rebellion, pp. 71–3; Mumm, Stolen Daughters ...

Protestant Communalism in the Trans Atlantic World  1650   1850

This book explores the trans-Atlantic history of Protestant traditions of communalism – communities of shared property. The sixteenth-century Reformation may have destroyed monasticism in northern Europe, but Protestant Christianity has not always denied common property. Between 1650 and 1850, a range of Protestant groups adopted communal goods, frequently after crossing the Atlantic to North America: the Ephrata community, the Shakers, the Harmony Society, the Community of True Inspiration, and others. Early Mormonism also developed with a communal dimension, challenging its surrounding Protestant culture of individualism and the free market. In a series of focussed and survey studies, this book recovers the trans-Atlantic networks and narratives, ideas and influences, which shaped Protestant communalism across two centuries of early modernity.

Providence and Empire

62Most ofthe discussion that follows is based on S. Mumm, Stolen Daughters, Virgin Mothers: Anglican Sisterhoods in Victorian Britain (London, 1999). 63Chadwick, VictorianChurch, PartOne, 506. 64Hoppen, The MidVictorian Generation,322.

Providence and Empire

The 19th century was, to a large extent, the ‘British century’. Great Britain was the great world power and its institutions, beliefs and values had an immense impact on the world far beyond its formal empire. Providence and Empire argues that knowledge of the religious thought of the time is crucial in understanding the British imperial story. The churches of the United Kingdom were the greatest suppliers of missionaries to the world, and there was a widespread belief that Britain had a divine mission to spread Christianity and civilisation, to eradicate slavery, and to help usher in the millennium; the Empire had a providential purpose in the world. This is the first connected account of the interactions of religion, politics and society in England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales between 1815 and 1914. Providence and Empire is essential reading for any student who wishes to gain an insight into the social, political and cultural life of this period.

The I B Tauris History of Monasticism

Susan Mumm, Stolen Daughters, Virgin Mothers: Anglican Sisterhoods in Victorian Britain (Leicester, 1999), 4. J. Scobell to Miss Gream, 1855, in Mumm, Stolen Daughters, Virgin Mothers, 176, and also see 209. Ibid., 189. Ibid., 168.

The I B Tauris History of Monasticism

From the earliest centuries of the church, asceticism and the contemplative life have been profoundly important aspects of western Christianity. And in assessing the glories of western civilization, perhaps the best place to start is within medieval monastic institutions, not outside of them. For while monasteries withdrew from the main currents of their societies, until the rise of universities in the 12th century they provided fertile soil and sanctuary to the liberal arts and sciences as well as those who wanted to spend their lives focused upon God. They became the driving cultural forces of Europe, nurturing education, music, manuscript illumination, art and history, agriculture, animal husbandry - all in addition to spiritual guidance. In this first general history of monasticism since 1900, Andrea Dickens explores the cloistered communities and individuals who have aspired to the ascetic ideal in their religious life, assessing the impact they have made on the wider church and its practices. She discusses some of the best known names in Christian history - including Cuthbert, Columba, Hilda of Whitby, Peter Abelard and Thomas Merton - and traces the monastic impulse from its beginnings in the Egyptian desert through the Rule of St Benedict, Cluny's foundation in 910, the austerity of the Cistercians, the legacy of women's houses, the critique of Luther and Calvin, Trappists and Catholic reform, up to the present-day ecumencial Taize community. Offering a lively and informed overview of western monasticism, the book will be essential reading for students of history and religion as well as the lay reader.

Oxford Movement

For a nuanced study of Anglican sisterhoods , see Susan Mumm , Stolen Daughters , Virgin Mothers : Anglican Sisterhoods in Victorian Britain ( London : Leicester University Press , 1999 ) , and , by the same author , All Saints Sisters ...

Oxford Movement

Well over a century and a half after its high point, the Oxford Movement continues to stand out as a powerful example of religion in action. Led by four young Oxford dons—John Henry Newman, John Keble, Richard Hurrell Froude, and Edward Pusey—this renewal movement within the Church of England was a central event in the political, religious, and social life of the early Victorian era. This book offers an up-to-date and highly accessible overview of the Oxford Movement. Beginning formally in 1833 with John Keble's famous "National Apostasy" sermon and lasting until 1845, when Newman made his celebrated conversion to Roman Catholicism, the Oxford Movement posed deep and far-reaching questions about the relationship between Church and State, the Catholic heritage of the Church of England, and the Church's social responsibility, especially in the new industrial society. The four scholar-priests, who came to be known as the Tractarians (in reference to their publication ofTracts for the Times), courted controversy as they attacked the State for its insidious incursions onto sacred Church ground and summoned the clergy to be a thorn in the side of the government. C. Brad Faught approaches the movement thematically, highlighting five key areas in which the movement affected English society more broadly—politics, religion and theology, friendship, society, and missions. The advantage of this thematic approach is that it illuminates the frequently overlooked wider political, social, and cultural impact of the movement. The questions raised by the Tractarians remain as relevant today as they were then. Their most fundamental question—"What is the place of the Church in the modern world?"—still remains unanswered.

Nursing History Review Volume 9 2001

By the end of the century both the sisters and the new secular trained nurses had lost that battle, ... Susan Mumm, Stolen Daughters, Virgin Mothers: Anglican Sisterhoods in Victorian Britain (Leicester: University of Leicester Press, ...

Nursing History Review  Volume 9  2001

ìLong neglected, the history of nursing has recently become the focus of a considerable amount of attention. Over the past decade, developments in the history of medicine, the history of women ó particularly of womenís work ó and nursing itself have resulted in a new recognition of the importance of the subject. As the official journal of the American Association for the History of Nursing, Nursing History Review enables those interested in nursing and health care history to trace new and developing work in the field. The Review publishes significant scholarly work in all aspects of nursing history as well as reviews of recent books and updates on national and international activities in health care history.î Under the distinguished editorship of Joan Lynaugh, with the Editorial Review Board including such noted nurses as Ellen Baer, Susan Baird, Olga Maranjian Church, Donna Diers, Marilyn Flood, Beatrice Kalisch, The Review provides historical articles, historiographic essays, discourse on the work of history, and multiple book reviews in each annual issue. Articles appearing in The Review are indexed/abstracted in CINAHL, Current Contents, Social Science Citation Index, Research Alert, RNdex, Index Medicus, MEDLINE, Historical Abstracts, and America: History and Life.

Making and remaking saints in nineteenth century Britain

See Susan Mumm, Stolen Daughters, Virgin Mothers: Anglican Sisterhoods in Victorian Britain (London: Leicester University Press, 1999), Appendix 1. Many of the Irish and continental Catholic orders that opened convents and other ...

Making and remaking saints in nineteenth century Britain

This original collection of essays examines for the first time the place of 'saints' and sanctity in nineteenth-century Britain.

Landmark Cases in the Law of Restitution

Stolen or Undutiful Daughters Most of the judges in Allcard v Skinner referred to the domestic situation that might ... Stolen Daughters, Virgin Mothers: Anglican Sisterhoods in Victorian Britain (London, Leicester University Press, ...

Landmark Cases in the Law of Restitution

It is now well established that the law of unjust enrichment forms an important and distinctive part of the English law of obligations. Restitutionary awards for unjust enrichment and for wrongdoing are clearly recognised for what they are. But these are recent developments. Before the last decade of the twentieth century the very existence of a separate law of unjust enrichment was controversial, its scope and content matters of dispute. In this collection of essays, a group of leading scholars look back and reappraise some of the landmark cases in the law of restitution. They range from the early seventeenth century to the mid-twentieth century, and shed new light on some classic decisions. Some argue that the importance of their case has been overstated; others, that it has been overlooked, or misconceived. All persuasively invite the reader to think again about some well-known authorities. The book is an essential resource for anyone, scholar, student or practitioner, with an interest in this fascinating area of the law.

Tracing Your Church of England Ancestors

20. Ibid., p.200. 21. Gregory, Restoration, Reformation, and Reform, op cit, p.75. 22. Virgin, The Church in an Age of Negligence, op cit, , pp.81 and 111–12. 23. Ibid, p.132. 24. Mumm, Susan. Stolen Daughters, Virgin Mothers: Anglican ...

Tracing Your Church of England Ancestors

In his latest handbook on the records of the major Christian religions, Stuart Raymond focuses on the Church of England. He identifies the available sources, comments on their strengths and weaknesses and explains how to make the best use of them. The history of the Church of England is covered, from the Reformation in the mid-sixteenth century until the present day. Anyone who has a family connection with the Church of England or a special interest in the local history of the church will find his book to be a mine of practical information and an essential aid for their research. A sequence of short, accessible chapters gives an insight into the relevant records and demonstrates how much fascinating genealogical information can be gleaned from them. After providing a brief history of the Church of England, and a description of its organization, Stuart Raymond explores the wide range of records that researchers can consult. Among them are parish registers, bishops transcripts, marriage licenses, churchwardens accounts, vestry minutes, church magazines, tithe records and the records of the ecclesiastical courts and Anglican charities and missions. A wealth of research material is available and this book is the perfect introduction to it.

The Oxford Handbook of Mary

Stolen Daughters, Virgin Mothers: Anglican Sisterhoods in Victorian Britain. London: Leicester University Press. Nolan, Mary Lee and Sidney. 1989. Christian Pilgrimage in Modern Western Europe. hapel Hill and London: University of North ...

The Oxford Handbook of Mary

The Oxford Handbook of Mary offers an interdisciplinary guide to Marian Studies, including chapters on textual, literary, and media analysis; theology; Church history; art history; studies on devotion in a variety of forms; cultural history; folk tradition; gender analysis; apparitions and apocalypticism. Featuring contributions from a distinguished group of international scholars, the Handbook looks at both Eastern and Western perspectives and attempts to correct imbalance in previous books on Mary towards the West. The volume also considers Mary in Islam and pilgrimages shared by Christian, Muslim, and Jewish adherents. While Mary can be a source of theological disagreement, this authoritative collection shows Mary's rich potential for inter-faith and inter-denominational dialogue and shared experience. It covers a diverse number of topics that show how Mary and Mariology are articulated within ecclesiastical contexts but also on their margins in popular devotion. Newly-commissioned essays describe some of the central ideas of Christian Marian thought, while also challenging popularly-held notions. This invaluable reference for students and scholars illustrates the current state of play in Marian Studies as it is done across the world.

Refugee Nuns the French Revolution and British Literature and Culture

“English Women Writers and the French Revolution,” in Sara E. Melzer and Leslie W. Rabine (eds), Rebel Daughters: Women ... Stolen Daughters, Virgin Mothers: Anglican Sisterhoods in Victorian Britain (London: Leicester University Press, ...

Refugee Nuns  the French Revolution  and British Literature and Culture

In eighteenth-century literature, negative representations of Catholic nuns and convents were pervasive. Yet, during the politico-religious crises initiated by the French Revolution, a striking literary shift took place as British writers championed the cause of nuns, lauded their socially relevant work, and addressed the attraction of the convent for British women. Interactions with Catholic religious, including priests and nuns, Tonya J Moutray argues, motivated writers, including Hester Thrale Piozzi, Helen Maria Williams, and Charlotte Smith, to revaluate the historical and contemporary utility of religious refugees. Beyond an analysis of literary texts, Moutray's study also examines nuns’ personal and collective narratives, as well as news coverage of their arrival to England, enabling a nuanced investigation of a range of issues, including nuns' displacement and imprisonment in France, their rhetorical and practical strategies to resist authorities, representations of refugee migration to and resettlement in England, relationships with benefactors and locals, and the legal status of "English" nuns and convents in England, including their work in recruitment and education. Moutray shows how writers and the media negotiated the multivalent figure of the nun during the 1790s, shaping British perceptions of nuns and convents during a time critical to their survival.

The Bloomsbury Guide to Christian Spirituality

Mumm, Susan (1999) Stolen Daughters, Virgin Mothers: Anglican Sisterhoods in Victorian Britain. London: Leicester University Press. Mursell, Gordon (2001), English Spirituality., 2 vols London: SPCK. Rowell, Geoffrey; Stevenson, Kenneth ...

The Bloomsbury Guide to Christian Spirituality

What is Christian Spirituality? How does it relate to non-Christian traditions? Where does it arise from and where is it going? These are some of the key questions addressed in this innovative new guide from Bloomsbury. The Bloomsbury Guide to Christian Spirituality is written by foremost academics in their fields who distill their knowledge for a wide intelligent audience. They do this with huge skill and attention to the needs of modern readers. Appealing equally to those studying the tradition for religious formation or those wishing to acquaint themselves with this fascinating subject, this guide is destined to become an essential text in the field.

Christina Rossetti

Susan Mumm, Stolen Daughters, Virgin Mothers: Anglican Sisterhoods in Victorian Britain (London and New York: Leicester University Press, 1999), 13. 94. Ibid. 72. 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. 100. 101. 102. 103. 104. See Susan Mumm, ed., ...

Christina Rossetti

Christina Rossetti (1830-94) is regarded is one of the greatest Christian poets to write in English. While Rossetti has firmly secured her place in the canon, her religious poetry was for a long time either overlooked or considered evidence of a melancholic disposition burdened by faith. Recent scholarship has redressed reductive readings of Christian theology as repressive by rethinking it as a form of compassionate politics. This shift has enabled new readings of Rossetti's work, not simply as a body of significant nineteenth-century devotional literature, but also as a marker of religion's relevance to modern concerns through its reflections on science and materialism, as well as spirituality and mysticism. Emma Mason offers a compelling study of Christina Rossetti, arguing that her poetry, diaries, letters, and devotional commentaries are engaged with both contemporary theological debate and an emergent ecological agenda. In chapters on the Catholic Revival, Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, contemporary debates on plant and animal being, and the relationship between grace and apocalypse, Mason reads Rossetti's theology as an argument for spiritual materialism and ecological transformation. She ultimately suggests that Rossetti's life and work captures the experience of faith as one of loving intimacy with the minutiae of creation, a divine body in which all things, material and immaterial, human and nonhuman, divine and embodied, are interconnected.