Storylistening

Taking the reader through complex ideas from different disciplines in ways that do not require any prior knowledge, this book is an essential read for policymakers, political scientists, students of literary studies, and anyone interested ...

Storylistening

Storylistening makes the case for the urgent need to take stories seriously in order to improve public reasoning. Dillon and Craig provide a theory and practice for gathering narrative evidence that will complement and strengthen, not distort, other forms of evidence, including that from science. Focusing on the cognitive and the collective, Dillon and Craig show how stories offer alternative points of view, create and cohere collective identities, function as narrative models, and play a crucial role in anticipation. They explore these four functions in areas of public reasoning where decisions are strongly influenced by contentious knowledge and powerful imaginings: climate change, artificial intelligence, the economy, and nuclear weapons and power. Vivid performative readings of stories from The Ballad of Tam-Lin to The Terminator demonstrate the insights that storylistening can bring and the ways it might be practised. The book provokes a reimagining of what a public humanities might look like, and shows how the structures and practices of public reasoning can evolve to better incorporate narrative evidence. Storylistening aims to create the conditions in which the important task of listening to stories is possible, expected, and becomes endemic. Taking the reader through complex ideas from different disciplines in ways that do not require any prior knowledge, this book is an essential read for policymakers, political scientists, students of literary studies, and anyone interested in the public humanities and the value, importance, and operation of narratives.

Narrative Organizations

Storylistening. Workshop: Sharing. Experiences. Christine. Erlach. and. Michael. Müller. What Is a Storylistening Workshop? At first glance, the storylistening workshop might come across as a fairly basic narrative setting.

Narrative Organizations

This book shows how to work with stories and narrative approaches in almost all fields of action of a company, and demonstrates the added value resulting from a holistic narrative perspective. The authors take thereby a practice-based perspective from the viewpoint of managing directors, the C-suite, organizational developers, corporate communicators and advisers with a rich description of the methods and implementation. By the employment of these narrative methods, leadership styles, communication, knowledge and change management can be planned in such a way that on the one hand the identity-core of the enterprise remains always apparent and on the other, the organization can develop in an agile fashion into the future.

Story Listening and Experience in Early Childhood

We have observed and know that story listening can engage listeners in a story-listening trance or absorb them to the point that they are in a state of transportation. But if those mental states do no more than just hold a listener's ...

Story Listening and Experience in Early Childhood

This book shows connections between oral story listening and unique, enduring educational effects in and outside of the classroom. Using scientific studies and interviews, as well as personal observations from more than thirty years in schools and libraries, the authors examine learning outcomes from frequent story listening. Throughout the book, Schatt and Ryan illustrate that experiencing stories told entirely from memory transforms individuals and builds community, affecting areas such as reading comprehension, visualization, focus, flow states, empathy, attachment, and theory of mind.

Bringing Linguistics to Work A Story Listening Story Finding and Story Telling Approach to Your Career

The point is to familiarize yourself with the stories that organizations tell about themselves, the places and communities where those stories get told, and the kinds of useful information that you can glean from active story listening.

Bringing Linguistics to Work  A Story Listening  Story Finding  and Story Telling Approach to Your Career

You were drawn to linguistics as a course of study because you enjoy tackling challenges, so why not bring the skills you have honed to professional challenges that speak to you? The world (of work) needs linguists!! Linguists possess a unique set of analytical skills that are applicable in any professional context, and which may also be brought to the process of finding the job. Who better to tackle the series of texts and interactions that comprise the job search than someone trained to critically analyze language? There’s no reason our cover letters shouldn’t be the very best ones out there!! In this book, I share stories of professional linguists to help answer the perennial question “linguistics? what can you do with that?” along with developmental activities to help you use the tools and skills you already possess to navigate your career next steps. “Here’s to what’s next!”

Storylistening

Taking the reader through complex ideas from different disciplines in ways that do not require any prior knowledge, this book is an essential read for policy-makers, political scientists, students of literary studies, and anyone interested ...

Storylistening

Storylistening makes the case for the urgent need to take stories seriously in order to improve public reasoning. Dillon and Craig provide a theory and practice for gathering narrative evidence that will complement and strengthen, not distort, other forms of evidence, including that from science. Focusing on the cognitive and the collective, Dillon and Craig show how stories offer alternative points of view, create and cohere collective identities, function as narrative models, and play a crucial role in anticipation. They explore these four functions in areas of public reasoning where decisions are strongly influenced by contentious knowledge and powerful imaginings: climate change, artificial intelligence, the economy, and nuclear weapons and power. Vivid performative readings of stories from the ballad of Tam Lin to the Terminator demonstrate the insights that storylistening can bring and the ways it might be practiced. The book provokes a reimagining of what a public humanities might look like, and shows how the structures and practices of public reasoning can evolve to better incorporate narrative evidence. Storylistening aims to create the conditions in which the important task of listening to stories is possible, expected, and becomes endemic. Taking the reader through complex ideas from different disciplines in ways that do not require any prior knowledge, this book is an essential read for policy makers, political scientists, students of literary studies, and anybody interested in the public humanities and the value, importance and operation of narratives.

African American Pastoral Care

Storylistening is also an important dimension of African American pastoral care, and the narrative approach is a story-listening as well as a storytelling approach. Story-listening involves empathically hearing the story of the person ...

African American Pastoral Care

Respond to God's unfolding drama to bring healing and reconciliation. In this major revision of his classic book, Dr. Edward Wimberly updates his narrative methodology by examining current issues in African American pastoral care and counseling.

Getting Change Right

Storylistening is paying careful attention to another's storytelling. Reconnaissance using eight storylistening skills and accomplishes two important goals simultaneously: gathering valuable information from the most important ...

Getting Change Right

Presents a model of leadership communication that moves from to-down dictums to the collaborative construction of shared understanding. Serves as a practitioner's guide to implementing change, presenting a critical shift from the old mind-set of coming up with a good idea and then pushing it through with mandates to one of engagement-- the need to connect to people, to listen as much as to share ideas, and to involve as many key people as possible in the realization of their goals.

Restorying Our Lives

Chapter 6 Storytelling and Storylistening : Ethical Issues I've found that we feel stronger and more hopeful after writing and sharing our autobiographies . We see that we must have been good travellers to have gotten this far .

Restorying Our Lives

A blend of practical insight and academic analysis concerning composing or "storying" our lives. With a bibliography on the narrative approach in the human sciences, and examples, this work should be a useful resource for anyone curious about the dynamics of continuity and change.

Story Listening and Experience in Early Childhood

This book shows connections between oral story listening and unique, enduring educational effects in and outside of the classroom.

Story Listening and Experience in Early Childhood

This book shows connections between oral story listening and unique, enduring educational effects in and outside of the classroom. Using scientific studies and interviews, as well as personal observations from more than thirty years in schools and libraries, the authors examine learning outcomes from frequent story listening. Throughout the book, Schatt and Ryan illustrate that experiencing stories told entirely from memory transforms individuals and builds community, affecting areas such as reading comprehension, visualization, focus, flow states, empathy, attachment, and theory of mind.

Identity and Strategy

Thus, using storylistening®, facilitators need to be thoughtfully inquisitive during the interview in order to discover the unexpected (Reason and Rowan, 1990). They should be well trained and experienced in passive interview techniques ...

Identity and Strategy

This book exemplifies one of the most complete and rigorous examples of scholarship relative to its subject matter that I have ever seen. Russell L. Ackoff, University of Pennsylvania, US This is a book written by someone who makes a living from helping organizations make strategy. It is also, though, written by a scholar someone who has thought hard about the topic and knows what other scholars think. This mix makes a book that is both thorough, well argued, and yet of great significance for consultants and managers. It unashamedly takes an inside-out view of strategy making, and this is what makes it so practical. It focuses on what those who manage want to do with their organization, rather than on some notion of what they should do. The book takes the field of strategic management forward by bringing theory and practice together more management writing needs to come from practitioner scholars. Colin Eden, University of Strathclyde Graduate School of Business, UK Olaf Rughase successfully unlocks important insights for creative market strategy development by linking it to central ideas about organizational identity. He provides a compelling theoretical rationale and useful practical process insights for how to induce creative market strategy formation through articulating current desired organizational identities. The book is clearly written, the claims well documented and well illustrated, providing a fresh and useful perspective on how to enable market strategies that work. Jane E. Dutton, University of Michigan, US In his well-researched book, Olaf Rughase introduces a new element into the concept of strategy which has so far been neglected to a surprising degree: the human factor. Strategy development certainly consists of data research, analysis and synthesis but after all, it is at least as much driven by fear and hope, will and might, the vision and the experience of the people involved. Only approaches that take this into account can claim any relevance for real-life strategy making. Viewed in this light, Olaf Rughase s book fills a gaping hole in the existing world of strategic thinking. Jörg Fengler, Management Consultancy, E.ON Ruhrgas AG, Germany Theorists and practitioners often underestimate the subtlety of each others thinking. Rughase s work engages seriously with both groups, and as a result is both deep and thoroughly practical. This is a genuinely original contribution. David Sims, Cass Business School, London, UK . . . this book is not just an academic treatise. Its insights grow out of facilitating strategy making, and one of these experiences is described in some detail. There are many practical observations to be found here. Political realities are acknowledged. Alternative paths anticipated. The ideas advanced here are, in combination, a genuine departure from past efforts. The theoretic development, which moves back and forth from experience to academic explanation, is convincing. From the foreword by Anne S. Huff This groundbreaking book explores the relationship between organizational identity and strategy and proposes a practical strategy making process that helps to avoid the typical pitfalls in strategic change processes. In doing so, the author bridges an important gap in management and strategy literature and explains how to practically link content and process when designing market strategies. A new conceptual framework is also presented which emphasizes the importance and dynamics of organizational identity and corresponding time discrepancies for strategy making. Whilst most strategists use the economically and analytically best strategy as a measure, Olaf Rughase introduces a new measure for strategy making that takes personal feelings, values and aspirations of organizational members into account. Claiming that individually desired organizational identities which can be seen as individual visions give direction, motivation and impetus for strategy action and developme

COMMUNICATIVE LANGUAGE TEACHING Know the Communicative Competence of Learners

Mediumfor Listening(Attitude) A StoryListening–Englishlanguage 17.33 B StoryListening–MarathiLanguage 18.00 C StoryListening–Adivasilanguage 33.80 DStoryListening–HindiLanguage 12.46 E StoryListening–Gujarathilanguage 18.40 5.

COMMUNICATIVE LANGUAGE TEACHING  Know the Communicative Competence of Learners


Narratives Health and Healing

(p. xxiv) The story of illness narratives, therefore, is incomplete without a focus on the potential healing effects of both storytelling and storylistening. Accordingly, in this chapter, we explore both storytelling and storylistening ...

Narratives  Health  and Healing

This distinctive collection explores the use of narratives in the social construction of wellness and illness. Narratives, Health, and Healing emphasizes what the process of narrating accomplishes--how it serves in the health communication process where people define themselves and present their social and relational identities. Organized into four parts, the chapters included here examine health narratives in interpersonal relationships, organizations, and public fora. The editors provide an extensive introduction to weave together the various threads in the volume, highlight the approach and contribution of each chapter, and bring to the forefront the increasingly important role of narrative in health communication. This volume offers important insights on the role of narrative in communicating about health, and it will be of great interest to scholars and graduate students in health communication, health psychology, and public health. It is also relevant to medical, nursing, and allied health readers.

New Perspectives on Consumer Culture Theory and Research

The storylistening part of the study revealed the following strategic issues based on orientation: – What are the orientations of customers towards the brand and the offering?

New Perspectives on Consumer Culture Theory and Research

In the post-socialist countries, the subject of consumption has not received sufficient attention from the perspective of Consumer Culture Theory. The opinion has long prevailed among the majority of social scientists from this region that consumer society and consumptive behaviour is a socially destructive phenomenon and one of the main causes of problems in contemporary society. This impression has prevented them from scrutinizing the symbolic dimension of consumption and led them to a critical analysis of the social causes and environmental consequences of excessive consumption. The examination of symbolic aspects of consumer culture or the mutual interaction of culture and marketing communication, for example, have remained outside the realm of academic interest. The absence of comprehensive academic interest in the topic of consumer culture does not, however, mean that consumer culture is not a subject of research. Such research, instead, takes place outside of the sphere of the university in the commercial sector and is primarily focused on issues of how to successfully sell products and services. Due to competitive concerns, commercial research into consumer culture has led to the privatization of its results, which runs contrary to the ideal of science as an open and critical project. The goal of this book is to create a counterbalance to this “science in the shadows” and overcome the mutual distrust between the academic and commercial spheres and make possible the transfer of recent discoveries between the two parties. This publication is dedicated to the exploration of three areas of consumer culture: research on consumer culture and consumer behaviour in post-socialist countries (especially in the Czech Republic), new developments in the theory of consumer culture and innovative methodological approaches to its research and, finally, to recent criticism of consumer culture and consumerism. It emerged from the collaboration of a team of authors made up of leading European researchers in the field of consumer culture, such as Kate Soper (London Metropolitan University), Franz Liebl (Berlin University of the Arts) and Rainer Gries (University of Vienna), as well as promising young scholars from the Czech Republic, Great Britain, Sweden, Serbia, Poland and Portugal. This book will be of great interest to students and scholars of sociology, cultural studies, marketing and market research.

Storytelling Art and Technique 5th Edition

The impact of storytelling and story listening is not—nor has it ever been—easily measured. Yet by better understanding the effects of story listening, educators can avoid the pedagogical fallacy of which Dewey speaks and become better ...

Storytelling  Art and Technique  5th Edition

This book serves as both a textbook and reference for faculty and students in LIS courses on storytelling and a professional guide for practicing librarians, particularly youth services librarians in public and school libraries. Storytelling: Art and Technique serves professors, students, and practitioners alike as a textbook, reference, and professional guide. It provides practical instruction and concrete examples of how to use the power of story to build literacy and presentation skills, as well as to create community in those same educational spaces. This text illustrates the value of storytelling, cover the history of storytelling in libraries, and offer valuable guidance for bringing stories to contemporary listeners, with detailed instructions on the selection, preparation, and presentation of stories. They also provide guidance around the planning and administration of a storytelling program. Topics include digital storytelling, open mics and slams, and the neuroscience of storytelling. An extensive and helpful section of resources for the storyteller is included in an expanded Part V of this edition. Offers readers a thorough overview of the role of story and storytelling in the library Gives a convincing argument for the value of storytelling Provides practical tips on selecting, preparing, and telling stories Presents insights on storytelling to specific populations, including children, young adults, and those with special needs Includes an extensive list of resources

A Multimodal Perspective on Applied Storytelling Performances

Leaning back or hypnotic stories, on the other hand, are said to “transport” the audience to a “storylistening trance” (Stallings 1988). Certain genres of stories, such as fairy tales, religious stories, fantasy and dreamlike stories ...

A Multimodal Perspective on Applied Storytelling Performances

In this volume, Soe Marlar Lwin proposes a contextualized multimodal framework that brings together storytelling practitioners’ and academic researchers’ conceptions of storytelling. It aims to highlight the ways in which various institutions in contemporary society have been using live storytelling performances as an effective communicative, educative and meaning-making tool. Drawing on theories of narrative from narratology as well as from related fields such as discourse analysis, multimodal analysis, communication and performance studies, the author proposes a contextualized multimodal framework to (a) uncover the potential narrativity of a live storytelling performance through an analysis of narrative elements constituting the story, (b) capture the process of developing actual narrativity through a multimodal analysis of performance features in the storytelling discourse, and (c) highlight the importance of context and dynamics between the storyteller and audience for an achievement of optimal narrativity in a particular storytelling event. The sample analysis shows how the framework not only describes the system governing institutionalized storytelling performances in general but also serves as a useful model to examine individual performance as a unique realization of the general system. The book also offers implications for possible applications of such contextualized multimodal frameworks more broadly across the disciplines.

Is There a Heaven for a G

... past before their current crisis. reflection is pivotal in storylistening. Usually unfortunate transference and projection occur when the story-listener begins to insert their own experiences and beliefs in the pastoral encounter.

Is There a Heaven for a  G

The moment the pager rings, all hell breaks loose. Across the pager appears the words, "Code Yellow ER: Gun Shot Wound." A chaplain at a Level I trauma center can dread these words. These words mean it's gonna' be a long night. These words mean somebody is probably fighting for their life right now. How does a hospital chaplain provide pastoral care to gang member patients? What are the systemic factors that contribute to gang violence? How does the American culture contribute to gang violence? What is the church called to be and do? Where is the hope? These are just some of the questions that this fast-paced, energetic book tackles, ultimately leaving one to theologically grapple with the question: Is There A Heaven For A 'G' (or Gangster)? Buckle up and get ready for this adrenaline ride. One thing is for certain, after engaging this book, readers won't view gang violence in the same way ever again.

Story Strategy

Story Strategy


Evocative Coaching

... of judgment and fear for people to open up and speak freely. That is especially STORY LISTENING ThePowerofStory Evoking Coachable Stories CHAPTER 8COACHING CONVERSATIONS The Great 8: Choreographing the Coaching Dance StoryListening.

Evocative Coaching

There?s a lot of conversation about how to make schools better. Unfortunately, the nature of those conversations often makes things worse. Evocative Coaching: Transforming Schools One Conversation at a Time maps out a way to change that. By taking a teacher-centered, no-fault, strengths-based approach to performance improvement, the Evocative Coaching model generates the motivation and movement that enables teachers and schools to achieve desired outcomes and enhance quality of life. Viewed as a dynamic dance, the model is choreographed in four steps ? Story, Empathy, Inquiry, Design ? which are each laid out in its own chapter with powerful illustrative materials and end-of-chapter discussion questions to prompt further reflection. Bringing together the best research and wisdom in educational leadership and professional coaching, authors Bob and Megan Tschannen-Moran have developed a simple yet profound way of facilitating new conversations in schools through Story Listening, Expressing Empathy, Appreciative Inquiry, and Design Thinking. It?s an iterative process that moves beyond old ways of thinking, doing, and being. It?s an inspirational process that reinvigorates the passion for making schools better, one conversation at a time. This happens when coaches: give teachers our full, undivided attention; accept and meet teachers where they are right now, without making them wrong; ask and trust teachers to take charge of their own learning and growth; make sure teachers are talking more than we are; enable teachers to appreciate the positive value of their own experiences; harness the strengths teachers have to meet challenges and overcome obstacles; reframe difficulties and challenges as opportunities to learn and grow; invite teachers to discover possibilities and find answers for themselves; dialogue with teachers regarding their higher purpose for teaching; uncover teachers? natural impulse to engage with colleagues and students; assist teachers to draw up a personal blueprint for professional mastery; support teachers in brainstorming and trying new ways of doing things; maintain an upbeat, energetic, and positive attitude at all times; collaborate with teachers to design and conduct appropriate learning experiments; enable teachers to build supportive environments and teams; use humor to lighten the load; and inspire and challenge teachers to go beyond what they would do alone. Each chapter provides a research-based theory to support the strategies presented, and includes specific suggestions and anecdotes. The Evocative Coaching model makes coaching enjoyable by getting people to focus on what they do best, and it invites larger, more integral conversations so that people talk about their work in the context of other things they care about. Resting on strong, evidence-based practices, the Evocative Coaching model offers educators the help they need to meet the challenges of increased accountability and expectations. This model can also be used effectively by coaches and leaders in other organizational contexts. Table of Contents: Chapter 1: What Is Evocative Coaching? Chapter 2: Coaching Presence Loop I: The No-Fault Turn Chapter 3: Story Listening Chapter 4: Expressing Empathy Loop II: The Strengths-Building Turn Chapter 5: Appreciative Inquiry Chapter 6: Design Thinking Chapter 7: Aligning Environments Chapter 8: Coaching Conversations Chapter 9: The Reflective Coach To learn more about Evocative Coaching and to sign up for the Evocative Coach Training Program, visit w