Studies in the Literary Imagination

Studies in the Literary Imagination Forthcoming Issues Spring 1981 W. B. YEATS: THE OCCULT AND PHILOSOPHICAL BACKGROUNDS, ed. Ted R. Spivey Fall 1981 THE INKLINGS, ed. Raymond Carter Sutherland You are invited to become a regular ...

Studies in the Literary Imagination


Catholicism and American Borders in the Gothic Literary Imagination

Studies in the Literary Imagination 27.2 (Fall 1994): 29–39. Mahoney, Dhira B., ed. and introduction. The Grail: A Casebook. New York: Garland, 2000. Martin, Robert, and Eric Savoy. American Gothic: New Interventions in a National ...

Catholicism and American Borders in the Gothic Literary Imagination

In Catholicism and American Borders in the Gothic Literary Imagination, Farrell O'Gorman presents the first study of the recurrent role of Catholicism in a Gothic tradition that is essential to the literature of the United States. In this tradition, Catholicism is depicted as threatening to break down borders separating American citizens—or some representative American—from a larger world beyond. While earlier studies of Catholicism in the American literary imagination have tended to highlight the faith's historical association with Europe, O'Gorman stresses how that imagination often responds to a Catholicism associated with Latin America and the Caribbean. On a deeper level, O'Gorman demonstrates how the Gothic tradition he traces here builds on and ultimately transforms the persistent image in modern Anglophone literature of Catholicism as “a religion without a country; indeed, a religion inimical to nationhood.” O'Gorman focuses on the work of J. Hector St. John de Crèvecœur, Herman Melville, Kate Chopin, William Faulkner, Flannery O’Connor, Walker Percy, Cormac McCarthy, and selected contemporary writers including Toni Morrison. These authors, representing historical periods from the early republic to the present day, have distinct experiences of borders within and around their nation and hemisphere, itself an ever-emergent “America.” As O'Gorman carefully documents, they also have distinct experiences of Catholicism and distinct ways of imagining the faith, often shaped at least in part within the Church itself. In their narratives, Catholicism plays a complicated and profound role that ultimately challenges longstanding notions of American exceptionalism and individual autonomy. This analysis contributes not only to discourse regarding Gothic literature and nationalism but also to a broader ongoing dialogue regarding religion, secularism, and American literature.

Islands Identity and the Literary Imagination

Anthem Studies in Australian Literature and Culture Anthem Studies in Australian Literature and Culture specializes in quality, innovative research in Australian literary studies. The series publishes work that advances contemporary ...

Islands  Identity and the Literary Imagination

Australia is the planet’s sole island continent. This book argues that the uniqueness of this geography has shaped Australian history and culture, including its literature. Further, it shows how the fluctuating definition of the island continent throws new light on the relationship between islands and continents in the mapping of modernity. The book links the historical and geographical conditions of islands with their potent role in the imaginaries of European colonisation. It prises apart the tangled web of geography, fantasy, desire and writing that has framed the Western understanding of islands, both their real and material conditions and their symbolic power, from antiquity into globalised modernity. The book also traces how this spatial imaginary has shaped the modern 'man' who is imagined as being the island's mirror. The inter-relationship of the island fantasy, colonial expansion, and the literary construction of place and history, created a new 'man': the dislocated and alienated subject of post-colonial modernity. This book looks at the contradictory images of islands, from the allure of the desert island as a paradise where the world can be made anew to their roles as prisons, as these ideas are made concrete at moments of British colonialism. It also considers alternatives to viewing islands as objects of possession in the archipelagic visions of island theorists and writers. It compares the European understandings of the first and last of the new worlds, the Caribbean archipelago and the Australian island continent, to calibrate the different ways these disparate geographies unifed and fractured the concept of the planetary globe. In particular it examines the role of the island in this process, specifically its capacity to figure a 'graspable globe' in the mind. The book draws on the colonial archive and ranges across Australian literature from the first novel written and published in Australia (by a convict on the island of Tasmania) to both the ancient dreaming and the burgeoning literature of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in the twenty-first century. It discusses Australian literature in an international context, drawing on the long traditions of literary islands across a range of cultures. The book's approach is theoretical and engages with contemporary philosophy, which uses the island and the archipleago as a key metaphor. It is also historicist and includes considerable original historical research.

Olmsted South Old South Critic New South Planner

He is the author of James Agee and the forthcoming book Thomas Merton , and is also editor of issues of Studies in the Literary Imagination . His articles and reviews have appeared in numerous scholarly journals .

Olmsted South  Old South Critic  New South Planner


Breeding and Eugenics in the American Literary Imagination

Palgrave Studies in Literature, Science and Medicine Series editors: Prof Sharon Ruston (Lancaster University, UK), Prof Alice Jenkins (University of Glasgow, UK) and Prof Catherine Belling (Northwestern University, USA) Palgrave ...

Breeding and Eugenics in the American Literary Imagination

A disturbing but ultimately discredited strain in American thought, eugenics was a crucial ideological force in the early twentieth century. Luczak investigates the work of writers like Jack London and Charlotte Perkins Gilman, to consider the impact of eugenic racial discourse on American literary production from 1900-1940.

Tuberculosis and the Victorian Literary Imagination

cambridge studies in nineteenth-century literature and culture General editor Gillian Beer, University of Cambridge Editorial board Isobel Armstrong, Birkbeck, University of London Kate Flint, Rutgers University Catherine Gallagher, ...

Tuberculosis and the Victorian Literary Imagination

This book examines representations of tuberculosis in Victorian fiction, giving insights into how society viewed this disease and its sufferers.

Fate and Prognostication in the Chinese Literary Imagination

QunXie is a Professor of English and Director of the Center of Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies of Zhongnan University of Economics and Law, China. She got her PhD from The Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2004.

Fate and Prognostication in the Chinese Literary Imagination

The essays collected in Fate and Prognostication in the Chinese Literary Imagination deal with the issues hidden in the Chinese conception of fate as represented in literary texts and films, with a focus placed on human efforts to solve the riddles of fate prediction.

Philosophy Dreaming and the Literary Imagination

The majority of recently published studies on literature and dreams tend to repudiate neurocognitive insights as irrelevant to, or inappropriate for, their field of study, sometimes explicitly so.62 In contrast, my interdisciplinary ...

Philosophy  Dreaming and the Literary Imagination

This book explores the intersections between dreaming and the literary imagination, in light of the findings of recent neurocognitive and empirical research, with the aim to lay a groundwork for an empirically informed aesthetics of dreaming. Drawing on perspectives from literary theory, philosophy of mind and dream research, this study investigates dreaming in relation to creativity and waking states of imagination such as writing and reading stories. Exploring the similarities and differences between the 'language' of dreams and the language of literature, it analyses the strategies employed by writers to create a sense of dream in literary fiction as well as the genres most conducive to this endeavour. The book closes with three case studies focusing on texts by Kazuo Ishiguro, Clare Boylan and John Banville to illustrate the diverse ways in which writers achieve to 'translate' the experience and 'language' of the dream.

Becoming Utopian

Suvin, D. (1973), “Defining the Literary Genre of Utopia: Some Historical Semantics, Some Genology, a Proposal, and a Plea,” Studies in the Literary Imagination 2 (1973): 121–45. Suvin, D. (1976), “'Utopian' and 'Scientific': Two ...

Becoming Utopian

A dream of a better world is a powerful human force that inspires activists, artists, and citizens alike. In this book Tom Moylan – one of the pioneering scholars of contemporary utopian studies – explores the utopian process in its individual and collective trajectory from dream to realization. Drawing on theorists such as Fredric Jameson, Donna Haraway and Alain Badiou and science fiction writers such as Kim Stanley Robinson and China Miéville, Becoming Utopian develops its argument for sociopolitical action through studies that range from liberation theology, ecological activism, and radical pedagogy to the radical movements of 1968. Throughout, Moylan speaks to the urgent need to confront and transform the global environmental, economic, political and cultural crises of our time.

American and British Poetry

Jonson's Epigrammes : The Named and the Nameless , " Studies in the Literary Imagination 6 ( 1 ) , April 1973 , 176-78 . " To Sir Robert Wroth " HUGH MACLEAN . " Ben Jonson's Poems : Notes on the Ordered Society , " in Seventeenth ...

American and British Poetry


The Western in the Global Literary Imagination

He is the author of El proceso de la vio- lencia en la narrativa de Robert Penn Warren (University of the Basque Coun- try Press, 1995), Robert Laxalt: The Voice of the Basques in American Literature (Center for Basque Studies, ...

The Western in the Global Literary Imagination

This groundbreaking collection of essays shows how the American Western has been reimagined in different national contexts, producing fictions that interrogate, reframe, and remix the genre in unexpectedly critical ways.

Food and the Literary Imagination

The rise of historicism (in all its differentstripes) in literary andcultural studies has made it almost second natureto situatea literarywork in itshistorical context, as a reflection of the life and timesof its authorand first readers ...

Food and the Literary Imagination

Food and the Literary Imagination explores ways in which the food chain and anxieties about its corruption and disruption are represented in poetry, theatre and the novel. The book relates its findings to contemporary concerns about food security.

Fear in the Medical and Literary Imagination Medieval to Modern

Fear in the Medical and Literary Imagination, Medieval to Modern, Palgrave Studies in Literature, Science and Medicine, https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-55948-7_5 79 In eighteenth and nineteenth century studies of how sensations become.

Fear in the Medical and Literary Imagination  Medieval to Modern

This book is about an emotion constantly present in human culture and history: fear. It is also a book about literature and medicine, two areas of human endeavour that engage with fear most acutely. The essays in this volume explore fear in various literary and medical manifestations, in the Western World, from medieval to modern times. It is divided into two parts. The first part, Treating Fear, examines fear in medical history, and draws from theology, medicine, philosophy, and psychology, to offer an account of how fear shifts in Western understanding from the Middle Ages to Modern times. The second part, Writing Fear, explores fear as a rhetorical and literary force, offering an account of how it is used and evoked in distinct literary periods and texts. This coherent and fascinating collection will appeal to medical historians, literary critics, cultural theorists, medical humanities’ scholars and historians of the emotions.

Italy in the German Literary Imagination

... 1964– Italy in the German literary imagination : Goethe's Italian journey and its reception by Eichendorff , Platen , and Heine / Gretchen L. Hachmeister . p . cm . - ( Studies in German literature , linguistics , and culture ) ...

Italy in the German Literary Imagination

The German fascination with Italy, as seen in Goethe's Italian Journey and in a number of literary reactions to it. Italy has long exerted a particular fascination on the Germans, and this has been reflected in German literature, most prominently in Goethe's Italienische Reise but also by numerous other writers who have returned to the topic. This book is concerned with two inextricably linked images - those of the German traveler in Italy and of Italy in German literature in the first third of the 19th century. Goethe's publication of his account nearly three decades after his actual journey was in some measure a vehicle to resist the challenge of a new generation of writers, who in turn would confront what they found to be a questionable, if not altogether false, representation. Hachmeister emphasizes the consequences of the disparity between the reality of Goethe's journey and his depiction of it, taking into consideration also his occasional discomfort with Italy's classical past. She shows how the German predilection for Italy is unique in the larger European cultural context of the Grand Tour, before moving on to chapters that contain readings of Italienische Reise and Goethe's Römische Elegien. Individual chapters follow on Eichendorff's Aus dem Leben eines Taugenichts, Platen's Sonette aus Venedig, and Heine's three Italian Reisebilder, each of which is to some degree a reaction to Goethe's work. These chapters investigatehow the individual's reaction to Italy reflects his view of Germany and the author's role in early 19th-century German society. The conclusion offers a short glance at the continued evolution of the German fascination with Italyin the mid- and late nineteenth century. Gretchen Hachmeister received her Ph.D. in German literature from Yale University.

Philosophy Dreaming and the Literary Imagination

This book explores the intersections between dreaming and the literary imagination, in light of the findings of recent neurocognitive and empirical research, with the aim to lay a groundwork for an empirically informed aesthetics of ...

Philosophy  Dreaming and the Literary Imagination

This book explores the intersections between dreaming and the literary imagination, in light of the findings of recent neurocognitive and empirical research, with the aim to lay a groundwork for an empirically informed aesthetics of dreaming. Drawing on perspectives from literary theory, philosophy of mind and dream research, this study investigates dreaming in relation to creativity and waking states of imagination such as writing and reading stories. Exploring the similarities and differences between the 'language' of dreams and the language of literature, it analyses the strategies employed by writers to create a sense of dream in literary fiction as well as the genres most conducive to this endeavour. The book closes with three case studies focusing on texts by Kazuo Ishiguro, Clare Boylan and John Banville to illustrate the diverse ways in which writers achieve to 'translate' the experience and 'language' of the dream.

Monsters in the Italian Literary Imagination

Monsters in the Italian Literary Imagination will interest scholars and students of literary theory and criticism , gender studies , cultural studies , art , and Italian studies . KEALA JEWELL is an associate professor of French and ...

Monsters in the Italian Literary Imagination

A culture defines monsters against what is essentially thought of as human. Creatures such as the harpy, the siren, the witch, and the half-human all threaten to destroy our sense of power and intelligence and usurp our human consciousness. In this way, monster myths actually work to define a culture's definition of what is human. In Monsters in the Italian Literary Imagination, a broad range of scholars examine the monster in Italian culture and its evolution from the medieval period to the twentieth century. Editor Keala Jewell explores how Italian culture juxtaposes the powers of the monster against the human. The essays in this volume engage a wide variety of philological, feminist, and psychoanalytical approaches and examine monstrous figures from the medieval to postmodern periods. They each share a critical interest in how monsters reflect a culture's dominant ideologies.

Time the City and the Literary Imagination

Praise for Time, the City, and the Literary Imagination “As the editors and contributors to this volume make vividly ... major contribution to the fields of literary urban studies, time and temporality studies, and geocritical studies.

Time  the City  and the Literary Imagination

Time, the City, and the Literary Imagination explores the relationship between the constructions and representations of the relationship between time and the city in literature published between the late eighteenth century and the present. This collection offers a new way of reading the literary city by tracing the ways in which the relationship between time and urban space can shape literary narratives and forms. The essays consider the representation of a range of literary cities from across the world and consider how an understanding of time, and time passing, can impact on our understanding of the primary texts. Literature necessarily deals with time, both as a function of storytelling and as an experience of reading. In this volume, the contributions demonstrate how literature about cities brings to the forefront the relationship between individual and communal experience and time.

How Literary Worlds Are Shaped

In sum, How Literary Worlds Are Shaped is the first study to present a wide-ranging and detailed comparative account of the makings of literary worlds.

How Literary Worlds Are Shaped

Literary studies still lack an extensive comparative analysis of different kinds of literature, including ancient and non-Western. How Literary Worlds Are Shaped. A Comparative Poetics of Literary Imagination aims to provide such a study. Literature, it claims, is based on individual and shared human imagination, which creates literary worlds that blend the real and the fantastic, mimesis and genre, often modulated by different kinds of unreliability. The main building blocks of literary worlds are their oral, visual and written modes and three themes: challenge, perception and relation. They are blended and inflected in different ways by combinations of narratives and figures, indirection, thwarted aspirations, meta-usages, hypothetical action as well as hierarchies and blends of genres and text types. Moreover, literary worlds are not only constructed by humans but also shape their lives and reinforce their sense of wonder. Finally, ten reasons are given in order to show how this comparative view can be of use in literary studies. In sum, How Literary Worlds Are Shaped is the first study to present a wide-ranging and detailed comparative account of the makings of literary worlds.

Nigerian Literary Imagination and the Nationhood Project

Without overstressing the issue, the Nigerian literary imagination shifts to accommodate societal changes as the latter evolves. In addressing supposedly transgressive issues, providing novel or unsettling perspectives on familiar or ...

Nigerian Literary Imagination and the Nationhood Project

This book explores how modern Nigerian fiction is rooted in writers’ understanding of their identity and perception of Nigeria as a country and home. Surveying a broad range of authors and texts, the book shows how these fictionalized representations of Nigeria reveal authentic perceptions of Nigeria’s history and culture today. Many of the lessons in these works of literature provide cautionary tales and critiques of Nigeria, as well as an examination of the lasting impact of colonialism. Furthermore, the book presents the nation as both the framework and subject of its narrative. By conducting literary analyses of Nigerian fiction with historical reference points, this work demonstrates how Nigerian literature can convey profound themes and knowledge that resonates with audiences, teaching Nigerians and non-Nigerians about the colonial and postcolonial experience. The chapters cover topics on nationhood, women’s writing, postcolonial modernity, and Nigerian literature in the digital age.