Studying Lacan s Seminar VI

Series Editor: Carol Owens Studying Lacan's Seminars brings together leading Lacanian scholars and practitioners from across the globe to participate in a contemporary examination of Lacan's seminars, many of which are newly translated ...

Studying Lacan   s Seminar VI

The second volume in the Studying Lacan’s Seminars series, this book is the first comprehensive study of Lacan’s Seminar VI: Desire and its Interpretation. A natural companion to Bruce Fink’s recent translation of the seminar into English (2019), this book offers a genuine opportunity to delve deeply into the seminar, and a hospitable introduction to Lacan’s teachings of the 1950s. This important book brings together various aspects of Cox Cameron’s teachings and systematic, careful, and critical readings of Seminar VI. Lacan’s theorizing and conceptualizing of the object a, the fundamental fantasy, and aphanisis, as well as the ambiguous treatment of the phallus in his work at the time, are all introduced, contextualized, and explored in detail. The trajectories of his thinking are traced in terms of future developments and elaborations in the seminars that follow closely on the heels of Seminar VI – Seminars VII (Ethics of Psychoanalysis), VIII (Transference), IX (Identification), and X (Anxiety). Consideration is also given to how certain themes and motifs are recapitulated or reworked in his later teachings such as in Seminars XX (Encore), and XXIII (The Sinthome). Also included in this volume are two further essays by Cox Cameron, a most valuable critique of the concept of the phallus in Lacan’s theories of the 1950s, and an overview of Seminar VI originally presented as a keynote address to the APW congress in Toronto 2014. The book is of great interest to Lacanian scholars and students, as well as psychoanalytic therapists and analysts interested in Lacan’s teachings of the 1950s and in how important concepts developed during this period are treated in his later work.

Studying Lacan s Seminars IV and V

“A stellar constellation of readers analyze two of Lacan's major seminars here, one on our relation to the object and ... author of several books on Freud and Lacan, translator into English of Lacan's Ecrits and Seminars VI: Desire and ...

Studying Lacan s Seminars IV and V

This is the first collection of essays to offer a comprehensive analysis of, and reflection on, the major themes emergent in Jacques Lacan’s seminars of 1955-56 and 1956-57: Seminar IV – the object relation, and Seminar V – formations of the unconscious. Assessing the value of a clinical approach orientated around the question of the object lack in the contemporary clinic, the book comprises 16 chapters which follow the development of a range of concepts elaborated by Lacan in these seminars, including sustained engagement with his critique of object relations theory. It considers the effectiveness of these early ideas in clinical practice in relation to hysteria, phobia, fetishism, obsessional neurosis, and of the so-called "Borderline" case. Lacan’s early concepts are also subjected to critique for engagement with Queer theory, and research in asexuality or the operation(s) of the signifier Phallus. The chapters build to provide an invaluable resource to interpret and evaluate Lacan’s early teaching, and to find in his early concepts a fresh utility and scope for both clinical work and psychoanalytic research and enquiry. The book will be of great interest to Lacanian scholars and students, as well as psychoanalytic therapists, and analysts interested in Lacan’s early work.

Studying Lacan s Seminar VI

The second volume in the Studying Lacan's Seminars series, this book a comprehensive study of Lacan's Seminar VI: Desire and its Interpretation.

Studying Lacan s Seminar VI

The second volume in the Studying Lacan's Seminars series, this book is the first comprehensive study of Lacan's Seminar VI: Desire and its Interpretation. A natural companion to Bruce Fink's recent translation of the seminar into English (2019), this book offers a genuine opportunity to delve deeply into the seminar, and a hospitable introduction to Lacan's teachings of the 1950s. This important book brings together various aspects of Cox Cameron's teachings and systematic, careful, and critical readings of Seminar VI. Lacan's theorizing and conceptualizing of the object a, the fundamental fantasy, and aphanisis, as well as the ambiguous treatment of the phallus in his work at the time, are all introduced, contextualized, and explored in detail. The trajectories of his thinking are traced in terms of future developments and elaborations in the seminars that follow closely on the heels of Seminar VI - Seminars VII (Ethics of Psychoanalysis), VIII (Transference), IX (Identification), and X (Anxiety). Consideration is also given to how certain themes and motifs are recapitulated or reworked in his later teachings such as in Seminars XX (Encore), and XXIII (The Sinthome). Also included in this volume are two further essays by Cox Cameron, a most valuable critique of the concept of the phallus in Lacan's theories of the 1950s, and an overview of Seminar VI originally presented as a keynote address to the APW congress in Toronto 2014. The book is of great interest to Lacanian scholars and students, as well as psychoanalytic therapists and analysts interested in Lacan's teachings of the 1950s and in how important concepts developed during this period are treated in his later work.

Asexuality and Freudian Lacanian Psychoanalysis

13) says the unanswerable question of the Other's desire is a terrifying moment for the child which, for Lacan, ... Cox Cameron, O. (2021) (with Owens, C.), Studying Lacan's seminar VI: Dream, symptom, and the collapse of subjectivity.

Asexuality and Freudian Lacanian Psychoanalysis

Asexuality and Freudian-Lacanian Psychoanalysis: Towards a Theory of an Enigma proposes that asexuality is a libidinally founded desire for no sexual desire, a concept not included in psychoanalytic theory up to now. "Asexuality" is defined as the experience of having no sexual attraction for another person; as an emerging self-defined sexual orientation, it has received practically no attention from psychoanalytic research. This book is the first sustained piece of exploratory and theoretical research from a Freudian-Lacanian perspective. Using Freudian concepts to understand the intricacies of human sexual desire, this volume will also employ Lacanian conceptual tools to understand how asexuality might sustain itself despite the absence of Other-directed sexual desire. This book argues that asexuality holds a mirror to contemporary sexualized society which assumes sexual attraction and eroticism as the benchmarks for experiencing sexual desire. It also argues that asexuality may be a previously unrecognized form of human sexuality which can contribute new understandings to the range and breadth of what it means to be a sexual being. This book will be of interest to anyone in the area of asexuality or sexuality – psychoanalysts, psychotherapists, psychologists, psychiatrists, university lecturers, researchers, students or those simply curious about the possibilities of the human sex drive.

The Real Jouissance of Uncountable Numbers

Desire and the interpretation of desire in Hamlet, from Seminar VI on Desire and its Interpretation (trans: James Hulbert). Yale French Studies 55/56: 11–52. Lacan, J. (1959–1960). Book VII: The Ethics of Psychoanalysis.

The Real Jouissance of Uncountable Numbers

Lacan critiqued imaginary intuition for confusing direct perception with unconscious pre-conceptions about people and the world. The emphasis on description goes hand in hand with a rejection of theory and the science of the unconscious and a belief in the naive self-transparency of the world. At the same time, knowing in and of the Real requires a place beyond thinking, multi-valued forms of logic, mathematical equations, and different conceptions of causality, acausality, and chance. This book explores some of the mathematical problems raised by Lacan's use of numbers and the interconnection between mathematics and psychoanalytic ideas. Within any system, mathematical or otherwise, there are holes, or acausal cores and remainders of indecidability. It is this senseless point of non-knowledge that makes change, and the emergence of the new, possible within a system. This book differentiates between two types of void, and aligns them with the Lacanian concepts of a true and a false hole and the psychoanalytic theory of primary repression.

Zizek and Media Studies

30. studies, she states that the notion of a cinematic gaze derived from the analogy between screen and mirror ... in Lacan's Seminar XI (66). 6. Todd McGowan, The Real Gaze: Film Theory After Lacan (Albany, NY: SUNY, 2007), 28. 7.

Zizek and Media Studies

Film, media, and cultural theorists have long appealed to Lacanian theory in order to discern processes of subjectivization, representation, and ideological interpellation. Here, the contributors take up a Zizekian approach to studies of cinema and media, raising questions about power, ideology, sexual difference, and enjoyment.

Jacques Lacan and the Freudian Practice of Psychoanalysis

In his Seminar VI, for instance, he did not hesitate to impress on his audience that 'there can be no other subject than ... It is important to bear this difference in mind when studying Lacan' s comments on the One, for he continuously ...

Jacques Lacan and the Freudian Practice of Psychoanalysis

Jacques Lacan and the Freudian Practice of Psychoanalysis paints a completely new picture of the man and his ideas. The book suceeds in showing how ideas can become more accessible, and re-evaluates his significance within the field of psychodynamic psychotherapy. The book is structured thematically around five key issues: diagnosis, the analyst's position during the treatment, the management of transference, the formulation of interpretations, and the organisation of analytic training. For each of these issues, Lacan's entire work both published and unpublished material, has been taken into account and theoretical principles have been illustrated with clinical examples. The book also contains the first complete bibliography of Lacan's works in English. Clear, detailed, and wide ranging, Jacques Lacan and the Freudian Practice of Psychoanalysis will prove essential reading, not only for professionals and students within the fields of psychology and psychiatry, but for all those keen to discover a new Lacan.

Studies on Hysteria Revisited

1 J. Lacan, “Seminar on 'The Purloined Letter'” in Écrits (trans. B. Fink). New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 2006. ... 6 J. Lacan, The Seminar of Jacques Lacan, Book XX: Encore, 1972–1973 (trans. C. Gallagher, unedited). 7 Lacan, Book III: ...

Studies on Hysteria Revisited

Steeped in Lacanian theory, this book is the first of its kind to present a longitudinal approach to the study of hysteria. In these 21 seminars Dr Melman leads us from the first records of hysteria to Freud’s major discovery of the principal concepts of trauma, incompatibility, repression and the unconscious. Peppered with invaluable clinical examples, the author guides readers through difficult concepts as he links hysteria to the birth of psychoanalysis itself, and demonstrates how the reader may become implicated in this discourse. Capturing Melman’s indomitable spirit, Studies on Hysteria Revisited will be an important read for graduate students, clinicians, and those in psychoanalytic formation.

Lacan and the Destiny of Literature

Lacan admits this at the outset of his remarks on Hamlet in his Seminar VI: Le Désiret son Interprétation when he says ... significance for literary studies because, for Lacan, Hamlet was a modern hero caught up in the Other's desire.

Lacan and the Destiny of Literature

In contemporary academic literary studies, Lacan is often considered impenetrably obscure, due to the unavailability of his late works, insufficient articulation of his methodologies and sometimes stereotypical use of Lacanian concepts in literary theory. This study aims to integrate Lacan into contemporary literary study by engaging with a broad range of Lacanian theoretical concepts, often for the first time in English, and using them to analyse a range of key texts from different periods. Azari explores Lacan's theory of desire as well as his final theories of lituraterre, littoral, and the sinthome and interrogates a range of poststructuralist interpretive approaches. In the second part of the book, he outlines the variety of ways in which Lacanian theory can be applied to literary texts and offers detailed readings of texts by Shakespeare, Donne, Joyce and Ashbery. This ground-breaking study provides original insights into a number of the most influential intellectual discussions in relation to Lacan and will fill a recognised gap in understanding Lacan and his legacy for literary study and criticism.

Reading Lacan s crits From Signification of the Phallus to Metaphor of the Subject

Actually, in Seminar VI – Desire and its interpretation – Lacan dedicates five lessons on a dream analyzed by Ella ... At the beginning of 1959 Lacan was studying the status of the signifier in the actual praxis of psychoanalysis.

Reading Lacan   s   crits  From    Signification of the Phallus    to    Metaphor of the Subject

The Écrits was Jacques Lacan’s single most important text, a landmark in psychoanalysis which epitomized his aim of returning to Freud via structural linguistics, philosophy and literature. Reading Lacan’s Écrits is the first extensive set of commentaries on the complete edition of Lacan’s Écrits to be published in English. An invaluable document in the history of psychoanalysis, and one of the most challenging intellectual works of the twentieth century, Lacan’s Écrits still today begs the interpretative engagement of clinicians, scholars, philosophers and cultural theorists. The three volumes of Reading Lacan’s Écrits offer just this: a series of systematic paragraph-by-paragraph commentaries – by some of the world’s most renowned Lacanian analysts and scholars – on the complete edition of the Écrits, inclusive of lesser known articles such as ‘Kant with Sade’, ‘The Youth of Gide’, ‘Science and Truth’, ‘Presentation on Transference’ and ‘Beyond the "Reality Principle". The originality and importance of Lacan’s Écrits to psychoanalysis and intellectual history is matched only by the text’s notorious inaccessibility. Reading Lacan’s Écrits is an indispensable companion piece and reference-text for clinicians and scholars exploring Lacan's magnum opus. Not only does it contextualize, explain and interrogate Lacan's arguments, it provides multiple interpretative routes through this most labyrinthine of texts. Reading Lacan’s Écrits provides an incisive and accessible companion for psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic psychotherapists in training and in practice, as well as philosophers, cultural theorists and literary, social science and humanities researchers who wish to draw upon Lacan’s pivotal work.

The Hamlet Doctrine

Lacan, “Seminar VI: Desire and Its Interpretation,” 221. 23. ... hostile references to Claudius can be interpreted as indications of repressed admiration” (Lacan, “Desire and the Interpretation of Desire,” Yale French Studies, 50), ...

The Hamlet Doctrine

What Shakespeare's greatest play tells us about the modern world Arguably, no literary work is more familiar to us than Shakespeare’s most famous tragedy. Everyone can quote at least six words from the play; often people know many more. In this riveting and thought-provoking re-examination, philosopher Simon Critchley and psychoanalyst Jamieson Webster explore Hamlet’s continued relevance for a modern world no less troubled by existential anxieties than Elizabethan London. Reading the drama alongside writers, philosophers and psychoanalysts—Schmitt, Benjamin, Freud, Lacan, Nietzsche, Melville, and Joyce—the authors delve into the politics of the era, the play’s relationship to religion, the exigencies of desire and the incapacity to love. It is an intellectual investigation that leads to a startling conclusion: Hamlet is a play about nothing in which Ophelia emerges as the true hero. From the illusion of theatre and the spectacle of statecraft to the psychological theatre of inhibition and emotion, what Hamlet makes manifest is the modern paradox of our lives: where we know, we cannot act. The Hamlet Doctrine is a passionate encounter with a great work of literature that continues to speak to us across centuries.

Sexual Enjoyment in British Romanticism

79 Jacques Lacan, The Seminar of Jacques Lacan, Book XV: The Psychoanalytic Act, 1967–1968, trans. Cormac Gallagher (unpublished translation from unedited French manuscripts, n.d.), 24.1.68 VII 6. 80 Burke, A Philosophical Enquiry, 11, ...

Sexual Enjoyment in British Romanticism

Debates about gender in the British Romantic period often invoked the idea of sexual enjoyment: there was a broad cultural concern about jouissance, the all-engulfing pleasure pertaining to sexual gratification. On one hand, these debates made possible the modern psychological concept of the unconscious - since desire was seen as an uncontrollable force, the unconscious became the repository of disavowed enjoyment and the reason for sexual difference. On the other hand, the tighter regulation of sexual enjoyment made possible a vast expansion of the limits of imaginable sexuality. In Sexual Enjoyment and British Romanticism, David Sigler shows how literary writers could resist narrowing gender categories by imagining unregulated enjoyment. As some of the era's most prominent thinkers - including Edmund Burke, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Robinson, Joanna Southcott, Charlotte Dacre, Jane Austen, and Percy Bysshe Shelley - struggled to understand sexual enjoyment, they were able to devise new pleasures in a time of narrowing sexual possibilities. Placing Romantic-era literature in conversation with Lacanian psychoanalytic theory, Sexual Enjoyment in British Romanticism reveals the fictive structure of modern sexuality, makes visible the diversity of sexual identities from the period, and offers a new understanding of gender in British Romanticism.

Essays on the Pleasures of Death

Jacques Lacan, "Desire and the Interpretation of Desire in Hamlet," ed. Shoshana Felman, in Literature and Psychoanalysis: The Question of Reading Otherwise, Yale French Studies, nos. 55/56 (1977): 11-52. The seminar of April 29, 1959, ...

Essays on the Pleasures of Death

In Essays on the Pleasure of Death, Ellie Ragland discusses the interconnection of Freud and Lacan's theories, while maintaining that crucial differences between them still exist. Ragland argues, however, that Lacan's "return to Freud" gave coherence to concepts which Freud could never explain: psychosis, narcissism, the body and the death drive. Drawing upon Lacan's untranslated seminars through 1981, Ragland analyzes his theories of the death drive and the concept of jouissance, the driving force behind language and libido. Along with her examination of Lacanian theories about the body, meaning systems, and how they shape reality, Ragland also discusses the ethical problems of psychoanalysis and the ways in which Lacan's work points to the inadequacies of terms like "sexuality" and "gender."

Times of Mourning

In the Seminar X, Anxiety (1962–1963),3 Lacan presented in the first class a matrix where he places, diagonally, ... (Lacan 2014, 333) He was referring to what he posed in Seminar VI, Desire and Its Interpretation (1958–1959), ...

Times of Mourning

Times of Mourning: Bereavement, Clinical Challenge, and Subjectivity works around the homonymous property of the word duelo in Spanish, which means both grief and duel. Adriana Bauab argues that the mourning process is a challenge and an opportunity for the subject to recompose their symbolic universe, recovering the function of lack that can ignite desire. Citing multiple clinical examples, Bauab proposes new tools for the treatment of grief.

Adventures in Transcendental Materialism

... 56 Seminar VI (Lacan), 99 Seminar VII (Lacan), 99, 240 Seminar XI (Lacan), 78, 81–3, 93 Seminar XVI (Lacan), 84–7, 95, ... 55–6, 101, 295 spirit see Geist Stalin, Joseph, 89–90, 98 Stanovich, Keith, 155 Studies on Hysteria (Freud), ...

Adventures in Transcendental Materialism

Critically engaging with thinkers including Slavoj Zizek, Alain Badiou, Catherine Malabou, Jean-Claude Milner, Martin Hagglund, William Connolly and Jane Bennett, Johnston formulates a materialist and naturalist account of subjectivity that does full just

Lacan and Klein Creation and Discovery

Cf. Hartmann and Kris, “The Genetic Approach in Psychoanalysis,” Psychoanalytic Studies ofthe Child 1 (1945): 11—30. 235. ... Seminar II: 246; translation modified following Bruce Fink, Lacan to the Letter: Reading Ecrits Closely ...

Lacan and Klein  Creation and Discovery

This book reconstructs the metapsychological and clinical theories of Melanie Klein and Jacques Lacan in a manner designed to redress prevalent mischaracterizations of their works that are largely responsible for the deadlocked polemics between partisans of Kleinian and Lacanian camps.

Lacan

Bibliography Lacan : Principal Publications The fullest guide so far published to Lacan's writings is Joël Dor's Bibliographie des ... Yale French Studies , 55/6 , 1977 , 11-52 ( a part - translation of Seminar VI by James Hulbert ] .

Lacan

Bowie (French language and literature, U. of London) traces the development of famed French psychoanalyst Lacan's (1901-1981) ideas over the 50-year span of his writing and teaching career, focusing on the mutations in Lacan's interpretation of Freud. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

A Clinical Introduction to Lacanian Psychoanalysis

Seminar V, “Unconscious Formations” (unpublished); on puns, slips, and parapraxes of all kinds. ... Discussions by different analysts of their analysis with Lacan. 6. A Lacanian Approach to Diagnosis Freud, Introductory Lectures on ...

A Clinical Introduction to Lacanian Psychoanalysis

Arguably the most profound psychoanalytic thinker since Freud, and deeply influential in many fields, Jacques Lacan often seems opaque to those he most wanted to reach. These are the readers Bruce Fink addresses in this clear and practical account of Lacan's highly original approach to therapy. Written by a clinician for clinicians, Fink's introduction is an invaluable guide to Lacanian psychoanalysis, how it's done, and how it differs from other forms of therapy. While elucidating many of Lacan's theoretical notions, the book does so from the perspective of the practitioner faced with the pressing questions of diagnosis, which therapeutic stance to adopt, how to involve the patient, and how to bring about change.

Contemporary Fiction and the Uses of Theory

6. Robert Eaglestone, in 'The Fiction of Angela Carter: The Woman Who Loved to Retell Stories', in Richard J. Lane, Rod Mengham and Philip ... Jacques Lacan, 'Seminar on “The Purloined Letter” ', Yale French Studies 48 (1972), 38–72.

Contemporary Fiction and the Uses of Theory

This topical study examines the 'novelizations' of radical literary theory in the work of A.S. Byatt, Angela Carter, Umberto Eco, John Fowles, Richard Powers and many other leading novelists. It offers a comprehensive analysis of the 'post-theoretical novel', and traces an alternative history of the 'theory revolution' in recent literary fiction.

Lacan s Return to Antiquity

side to Lacan that craved dialogue and response: 'Yesterday evening's meeting marked a definite step forward in comparison ... Studying Lacan in the context of his evolving seminar, the extent to which his theory is about communication, ...

Lacan s Return to Antiquity

Lacan’s Return to Antiquity is the first book devoted to the role of classical antiquity in Lacan’s work. Oliver Harris poses a question familiar from studies of Freud: what are Ancient Greece and Rome doing in a twentieth-century theory of psychology? In Lacan’s case, the issue has an additional edge, for he employs antiquity to demonstrate what is radically new about psychoanalysis. It is a tool with which to convey the revolutionary power of Freud’s ideas by digging down to the philosophical questions beneath them. It is through these questions that Lacan allies psychoanalysis with the pioneering intellectual developments of his time in anthropology, philosophy, art and literature. Harris begins by considering the role of Plato and Socrates in Lacan’s conflicted thoughts on teaching, writing and the process of becoming an intellectual icon. In doing so, he provides a way into considering the uniquely challenging nature of the Lacanian texts themselves, and the live performances behind them. Two central chapters explore when and why myth is drawn upon in psychoanalysis, its threat to the discipline’s scientific aspirations, and Lacan’s embrace of its expressive potential. The final chapters explore Lacan’s defence of tragedy and his return to Ovidian themes. These include the unwitting voyeurism of Actaeon, and the fate of Narcissus, a figure of tragic metamorphosis that Freud places at the heart of infantile development. Lacan’s Return to Antiquity brings to Lacan studies the close reading and cross-disciplinary research that has proved fruitful in understanding Freud’s invention of psychoanalysis. It will appeal to psychoanalysts and advanced students studying in the field, being of particular value to those interested in the roots of Lacanian concepts, the evolution of his thought, and the cultural context of his work. What emerges is a more nuanced, self-critical figure, a corrective to the reputation for dogmatism and obscurity that Lacan has attracted. In the process, new light is thrown on enduring controversies, from Lacan’s pronouncements on feminine sexuality to the opaque drama of the seminars themselves.