Culture and Subjective Well Being

Yet only in the last decades has the study of well-being become a scientific endeavor. This book is based on the idea that we can empirically study quality of life and make cross-society comparisons of subjective well-being (SWB).

Culture and Subjective Well Being

The question of what constitutes the good life has been pondered for millennia. Yet only in the last decades has the study of well-being become a scientific endeavor. This book is based on the idea that we can empirically study quality of life and make cross-society comparisons of subjective well-being (SWB). A potential problem in studying SWB across societies is that of cultural relativism: if societies have different values, the members of those societies will use different criteria in evaluating the success of their society. By examining, however, such aspects of SWB as whether people believe they are living correctly, whether they enjoy their lives, and whether others important to them believe they are living well, SWB can represent the degree to which people in a society are achieving the values they hold dear. The contributors analyze SWB in relation to money, age, gender, democracy, and other factors. Among the interesting findings is that although wealthy nations are on average happier than poor ones, people do not get happier as a wealthy nation grows wealthier.

The Science of Subjective Well Being

This authoritative volume reviews the breadth of current scientific knowledge on subjective well-being (SWB): its definition, causes and consequences, measurement, and practical applications that may help people become happier.

The Science of Subjective Well Being

This authoritative volume reviews the breadth of current scientific knowledge on subjective well-being (SWB): its definition, causes and consequences, measurement, and practical applications that may help people become happier. Leading experts explore the connections between SWB and a range of intrapersonal and interpersonal phenomena, including personality, health, relationship satisfaction, wealth, cognitive processes, emotion regulation, religion, family life, school and work experiences, and culture. Interventions and practices that enhance SWB are examined, with attention to both their benefits and limitations. The concluding chapter from Ed Diener dispels common myths in the field and presents a thoughtful agenda for future research.

Subjective Well Being

Subjective Well-Being: Measuring Happiness, Suffering, and Other Dimensions of Experience explores the use of this measure in population surveys. This report reviews the current state of research and evaluates methods for the measurement.

Subjective Well Being

Subjective well-being refers to how people experience and evaluate their lives and specific domains and activities in their lives. This information has already proven valuable to researchers, who have produced insights about the emotional states and experiences of people belonging to different groups, engaged in different activities, at different points in the life course, and involved in different family and community structures. Research has also revealed relationships between people's self-reported, subjectively assessed states and their behavior and decisions. Research on subjective well-being has been ongoing for decades, providing new information about the human condition. During the past decade, interest in the topic among policy makers, national statistical offices, academic researchers, the media, and the public has increased markedly because of its potential for shedding light on the economic, social, and health conditions of populations and for informing policy decisions across these domains. Subjective Well-Being: Measuring Happiness, Suffering, and Other Dimensions of Experience explores the use of this measure in population surveys. This report reviews the current state of research and evaluates methods for the measurement. In this report, a range of potential experienced well-being data applications are cited, from cost-benefit studies of health care delivery to commuting and transportation planning, environmental valuation, and outdoor recreation resource monitoring, and even to assessment of end-of-life treatment options. Subjective Well-Being finds that, whether used to assess the consequence of people's situations and policies that might affect them or to explore determinants of outcomes, contextual and covariate data are needed alongside the subjective well-being measures. This report offers guidance about adopting subjective well-being measures in official government surveys to inform social and economic policies and considers whether research has advanced to a point which warrants the federal government collecting data that allow aspects of the population's subjective well-being to be tracked and associated with changing conditions.

Subjective Well Being and Life Satisfaction

The goal of this volume is to offer scholarly summaries of theory and research on topics at the frontier of the study of these social psychological influences—both interpersonal and intrapersonal—on subjective well-being and life ...

Subjective Well Being and Life Satisfaction

The quality of people’s relationships with and interactions with other people are major influences on their feelings of well-being and their evaluations of life satisfaction. The goal of this volume is to offer scholarly summaries of theory and research on topics at the frontier of the study of these social psychological influences—both interpersonal and intrapersonal—on subjective well-being and life satisfaction. The chapters cover a variety of types of relationships (e.g., romantic relationships, friendships, online relationships) as well as a variety of types of interactions with others (e.g., forgiveness, gratitude, helping behavior, self-presentation). Also included are chapters on broader social issues such as materialism, sexual identity and orientation, aging, spirituality, and meaning in life. Subjective Well-Being and Life Satisfaction provides a rich and focused resource for graduate students, upper-level undergraduate students, and researchers in positive psychology and social psychology, as well as social neuroscientists, mental health researchers, clinical and counselling psychologists, and anyone interested in the science of well-being.

Culture and Well Being

Thus, the papers in this volume represent most of the major publications on culture and well-being. Furthermore, this is the area that is least well-known by most scholars.

Culture and Well Being

material boundaries capture cultural effects? The articles contained in this volume offer initial answers to most of these questions. The culture and well-being questions are of fundamental importance to understanding in the entire eld and to scienti c knowledge in the behavioral s- ences as a whole. Unless we understand what is universal and what is speci c, we cannot hope to understand the processes governing well-being. Unfortunately, our scienti c knowledge in most behavioral science elds, including the study of we- being, has been built on a narrow database drawn from westernized, industrialized nations. This means that we have only a little knowledge of whether our ndings are generalizable to all peoples of the globe and to universal human psychol- ical processes. Fortunately, during the last decade my students and I, as well as others working in this area, have rapidly expanded our knowledge of well-being vis-a-vis ` culture. The rst attempt to summarize the ndings in this area came in 1999 with Culture and Subjective Well-Being, a book edited by Eunkook Suh and Diener. The current volume represents a renewed effort to give a broad overview of major ndings in this area and to point to the important directions for future research. Composition of This Volume I am very pleased with the articles presented in this volume because I believe that they represent true advances in our fundamental understanding of subjective we- being.

Subjective Well Being and Social Media

the volatile and the structural components of well-being path described by virtual conversations on the net. ... of well-being based on self-declared evaluations of individuals, i.e., what is commonly conceived as subjective well-being.

Subjective Well Being and Social Media

Subjective Well-Being and Social Media shows how, by exploiting the unprecedented amount of information provided by the social networking sites, it is possible to build new composite indicators of subjective well-being. These new social media indicators are complementary to official statistics and surveys, whose data are collected at very low temporary and geographical resolution. The book also explains in full details how to solve the problem of selection bias coming from social media data. Mixing textual analysis, machine learning and time series analysis, the book also shows how to extract both the structural and the temporary components of subjective well-being. Cross-country analysis confirms that well-being is a complex phenomenon that is governed by macroeconomic and health factors, ageing, temporary shocks and cultural and psychological aspects. As an example, the last part of the book focuses on the impact of the prolonged stress due to the COVID-19 pandemic on subjective well-being in both Japan and Italy. Through a data science approach, the results show that a consistent and persistent drop occurred throughout 2020 in the overall level of well-being in both countries. The methodology presented in this book: enables social scientists and policy makers to know what people think about the quality of their own life, minimizing the bias induced by the interaction between the researcher and the observed individuals; being language-free, it allows for comparing the well-being perceived in different linguistic and socio-cultural contexts, disentangling differences due to objective events and life conditions from dissimilarities related to social norms or language specificities; provides a solution to the problem of selection bias in social media data through a systematic approach based on time-space small area estimation models. The book comes also with replication R scripts and data. Stefano M. Iacus is full professor of Statistics at the University of Milan, on leave at the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. Former R-core member (1999-2017) and R Foundation Member. Giuseppe Porro is full professor of Economic Policy at the University of Insubria. An earlier version of this project was awarded the Italian Institute of Statistics-Google prize for "official statistics and big data".

Subjective Well Being and Security

Social indicators of well-being: American's perceptions of life quality. New York: Plenum Press. ... The subjective well-being of people caring for a severely disabled family member at home: A review. Journal of Intellectual and ...

Subjective Well Being and Security

Security, or the perceived lack thereof, impacts on quality of life at many levels. An important consideration is how security should be best understood. Although definitions of how to understand human security have been proposed, it is not clear how security should be measured. Security can be analyzed from different perspectives i.e., personal security, economic security, health security, political security, cyber security etc. In this volume, all facets of research pertaining to security and subjective well-being (SWB) are discussed, including among others: Objective and subjective measures of security; Multiple security dimensions; The relationship between security and SWB and possible mediators and moderators; Cultural and religious influences on security and SWB; Present and future security; Perceptions of crime in cities and regions and development of relevant indicators; Security in a globalized era and its relationship to SWB; Security, major events and SWB

Social Capital and Subjective Well Being

Subjective well-being: Three decades of progress.https://doi.org/10.1037/00332909.125.2.276 Diener, E., Oishi, S., & Lucas, R. E. (2003). Personality, culture, and subjective well-being: Emotional and cognitive evaluations of life.

Social Capital and Subjective Well Being

This book presents a cross-cultural investigation into the interplay between social capital and subjective well-being. Based on a quantitative analysis of the latest large-N cross-cultural data sets, including the World Value Survey and the European Social Survey, and covering various countries, it offers a comparative perspective on and new insights into the determinants of social capital and well-being. By identifying both universal and culture-specific patterns, the authors shed new light on the spatial and temporal differentiation of social capital and subjective well-being. The book is divided into two main parts: The first discusses mutual trust, religious and cultural tolerance, and pro-social and human values as essential dimensions of social capital. In turn, the second part studies social capital as a source of subjective well-being and life satisfaction. Given its scope, the book will appeal to scholars of sociology, social psychology, political science and economics seeking a deeper understanding of the multi-faceted nature of social capital and well-being.

Well being

In this chapter , statistical results are presented on national distributions of wellbeing , and regression analyses of factors associated with high levels of subjective well - being are reported . The new analyses included in this ...

Well being

This book considers what makes us happy, using a new approach that directly addresses the circumstances under which highly subjective well-being is experienced, often with surprising results.

Measuring the Subjective Well Being of Nations

enced well-being and life (or happiness) satisfaction mostly have the same sign. ... For example, we show how differences in subjective well-being between age groups can be attributed to a component due to differences in time allocation ...

Measuring the Subjective Well Being of Nations

Surely everyone wants to know the source of happiness, and indeed, economists and social scientists are increasingly interested in the study and effects of subjective well-being. Putting forward a rigorous method and new data for measuring, comparing, and analyzing the relationship between well-being and the way people spend their time—across countries, demographic groups, and history—this book will help set the agenda of research and policy for decades to come. It does so by introducing a system of National Time Accounting (NTA), which relies on individuals’ own evaluations of their emotional experiences during various uses of time, a distinct departure from subjective measures such as life satisfaction and objective measures such as the Gross Domestic Product. A distinguished group of contributors here summarize the NTA method, provide illustrative findings about well-being based on NTA, and subject the approach to a rigorous conceptual and methodological critique that advances the field. As subjective well-being is topical in economics, psychology, and other social sciences, this book should have cross-disciplinary appeal.

OECD Guidelines on Measuring Subjective Well being

These Guidelines represent the first attempt to provide international recommendations on collecting, publishing, and analysing subjective well-being data.

OECD Guidelines on Measuring Subjective Well being

These Guidelines represent the first attempt to provide international recommendations on collecting, publishing, and analysing subjective well-being data.

Subjective Well being Among Different Age Groups

relationship has an impact on their subjective well - being which is substantial and stronger than its effect among older or middle - aged respondents . Other doma in satisfactions which contribute to the overall subjective well - being ...

Subjective Well being Among Different Age Groups


Subjective Well Being

Philosophy has long wondered about relations between a happy and an honest, moral life. This book includes chapters on the relationship between the satisfaction with life (the cognitive component of subjective well-being) and happiness.

Subjective Well Being

Philosophy has long wondered about relations between a happy and an honest, moral life. This book includes chapters on the relationship between the satisfaction with life (the cognitive component of subjective well-being) and happiness. Furthermore, the economics of happiness and subjective well-being (SWB) has been the focus of considerable attention among social scientists recently. All individuals want to be happy, but not everybody is happy. The authors examine the micro and macroeconomic influences on enhancing happiness and SWB. Other chapters aim to help the reader understand 1. Whether.

Adolescents Subjective Well being in Their Social Contexts

The scales of knowledge and activities are included in adolescent subjective well-being. An example of items regarding knowledge is: 'I know where I can get help from when I have trouble in my life'. An example of items of activities ...

Adolescents  Subjective Well being in Their Social Contexts


Metrics of Subjective Well Being Limits and Improvements

This volume analyses the quantification of the effect of factors measuring subjective well-being, and in particular on the metrics applied.

Metrics of Subjective Well Being  Limits and Improvements

This volume analyses the quantification of the effect of factors measuring subjective well-being, and in particular on the metrics applied. With happiness studies flourishing over the last decades, both in number of publications as well as in their exposure, researchers working in this field are aware of potential weaknesses and pitfalls of these metrics. Contributors to this volume reflect on different factors influencing quantification, such as scale size, wording, language, biases, and cultural comparability in order to raise awareness on the tools and on their conditions of use.

Happiness in Children

Because studies have only recently identified several of the factors associated with children’s happiness, the book ends with a discussion of how we might enhance children’s well-being and suggests directions for future research.

Happiness in Children

This briefs summarizes the research on positive well-being in children, with a particular focus on their happiness. It starts with a discussion of the constructs of positive psychology (i.e., well-being, happiness and life satisfaction), and then outlines the research that shows the importance of studying well-being. Next, it explores how researchers measure happiness and what these measures tell us about whether children are happy and how their happiness differs from adults. Following this, it discusses current positive psychology theories with the aim of suggesting their promise in understanding children’s well-being. Next, it examines the importance of individual differences, including culture and temperament. Because studies have only recently identified several of the factors associated with children’s happiness, the book ends with a discussion of how we might enhance children’s well-being and suggests directions for future research.

Subjective Well being a Definition of Subjective Well being and Happiness

Subjective well-being is often assessed using scales and questionnaires. "Subjective well-being: a definition of subjective well-being and happiness " is a pamphlet based on the book "A course in happiness".

Subjective Well being  a Definition of Subjective Well being and Happiness

Subjective well-being includes our response, perceived satisfaction, and assessment of life. Subjective well-being is not a synonymous of happiness, even if the two are often used interchangeably. Subjective well-being is often assessed using scales and questionnaires. "Subjective well-being: a definition of subjective well-being and happiness " is a pamphlet based on the book "A course in happiness." The pamphlet format makes it more accessible, both in terms of time and money, to readers who are interested only in selected topics which are part of "A course in happiness." "Subjective well-being: a definition of subjective well-being and happiness " is based on the research, inspirations, tools, etc. described on http: //www.iswb.org/ and http: //www.amareway.org/

The Science of Well Being

Ed Diener Abstract The literature on subjective well-being (SWB), including happiness, life satisfaction, and positive affect, is reviewed in three areas: measurement, causal factors, and theory. Psychometric data on single-item and ...

The Science of Well Being

Major Theoretical Questions Theories about subjective well-being have grown over the past several decades, but have been re ned only slowly as adequate data have been compiled to test them. We can characterize the theories describing happiness along several dimensions. The rst dimension is whether the theory places the locus of happiness in external conditions such as income and status, as many sociological theories do, or within the attitudes and temperament of the individual, as many psychological theories do. Some have maintained that people adapt to all circumstances over time, so that only individual personality matters for producing happiness, whereas others believe that economicandothersocietalfactorsarethedominantforcesinproducingwell-being. Throughout my writings there is a mix of both the internal and external factors that in uence well-being. A second dimension that characterizes scholarship on well-being is the issue of whether the factors affecting well-being are relative or absolute. That is, are there standards used by people at all times and places in judging their lives and in reacting to events? Or are standards dependent on what other people possess, on expec- tions,andonadaptationlevelsbasedonpastcircumstances?Again,thereisevidence supporting the role of both universal and relative standards. People around the globe are probably in uenced by common factors such as friendship versus loneliness, but even these universal in uences on happiness are probably subject to some degree of comparison depending on what the person is used to and what others have. However, some factors might be much more comparative than other in uences, as Hsee, Yang, Li, and Shen (in press) have described.

EBOOK Measuring Health A Review of Subjective Health Well being and Quality of Life Measurement Scales

oneself, a feeling that there is a place in the environment for oneself, acceptance of life, and a generalizable feeling of well-being (Lawton 1972, 1975), or more precisely, in terms of confidence and enthusiasm (George 1979; ...

EBOOK  Measuring Health  A Review of Subjective Health  Well being and Quality of Life Measurement Scales

An invaluable resource for health professionals and students engaged in research, this thoroughly updated edition provides a guide to the major measures of health and functioning. Measures of subjective health, well-being and quality of life are introduced along with analysis of their validity and reliability and the evidence for using each one. Throughout the book each measure is explained with a summary of how each one is scored and used, making this a one-stop guide to understanding health measurements, and the basic concepts behind measuring health, quality of life and well-being. • A new look and feel makes measures and scales easier to locate • Further research and evidence provides a greater critique of the measures • Useful source information to help you access each measure with permission • The addition of new scales include the Warwick-Edinburgh Wellbeing Scale, the Older People’s Quality of Life Scale and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire • Expanded material on functional independence and functional assessment measures Written by a renowned expert in health research, Measuring Health, 4th edition is essential reading for researchers and upper level undergraduates and postgraduates in health services research, health studies, health sciences, public health and social sciences. "The world of measurement scales, which ones to use and for what purpose, is a complex one even for experienced qualitative researchers. It is easy for less experienced researchers to lose their way. Ann Bowling's book provides an up to date and coherent guide and assessment of measurement tools which is comprehensible and well organised." Virginia Berridge, Professor of History and Director, Centre for History in Public Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK "In her latest edition of Measuring Health: A Review of Subjective Health, Well-Being and Quality of Life Measurement Scales, Professor Ann Bowling has, once again, provided us with an essential for our bookshelves. It is a vital resource for anyone investigating health and well-being – whether novice student researcher or experienced academic. Written in an accessible, easy to use style, we are initially taken through the importance of measuring and understanding lay people’s experiences of their physical and social health. The mechanics and challenges of measurement of subjective health are then described. Later chapters include handy definitions of relevant concepts and detailed descriptions of specific scales – both familiar and relatively new ones – including psychometric testing and use. This text is packed with useful information and can be used both as a resource for an overall understanding of measuring health and well-being or for selecting specific patient-based health scales for research projects." Dr. Nan Greenwood, Reader in Health and Social Care Service Research, St George's University of London and Kingston University, UK