Substance and Procedure in Private International Law

Examines the distinction between substance and procedure questions in private international law to analyse which is appropriate, providing detailed analysis of the decisional law in which the substance-procedure distinction has been ...

Substance and Procedure in Private International Law

Examines the distinction between substance and procedure questions in private international law to analyse which is appropriate, providing detailed analysis of the decisional law in which the substance-procedure distinction has been employed.

Substance and Procedure in Private International Law

This book examines the distinction between substance and procedure questions in private international law, and analyses where and whether each is appropriate.

Substance and Procedure in Private International Law

"When the law of a foreign country is selected or pleaded by a claimant or defendant, a question arises as to whether the issue pertains to substance, in which case it may be resolved by foreign law, or procedure, in which case it will be governed by the law of forum. This book examines the distinction between substance and procedure questions in private international law, and analyses where and whether each is appropriate. To do so, it examines previous attempts to define the scope of procedure in private international law, considers alternative choice of law methods for referring matters to the law of forum, and examines the influence of the doctrine of characterization on procedure. Substance and Procedure in Private International Law also provides detailed analysis of the decisional law in which the substance-procedure distinction has been employed, creating a clear assessment of its application in various practical situations and providing valuable guidance for practitioners on how the distinction should be applied. The book also considers 'procedural' topics such as service of process and the taking of evidence abroad, in order to show how the application of forum law may further be limited by foreign laws. With a foreword by the Hon Sir Anthony Mason."--Publisher's website.

Substance and Procedure in Private International Law

General Editor's Preface The Oxford Private International Law Series contains a number of works which fall within the ambit of what are referred to in the textbooks as preliminary or procedural matters. There is Richard Fentiman's ...

Substance and Procedure in Private International Law

When the law of a foreign country is selected or pleaded by a claimant or defendant, a question arises as to whether the issue pertains to substance, in which case it may be resolved by foreign law, or procedure, in which case it will be governed by the law of forum. This book examines the distinction between substance and procedure questions in private international law, and analyses where and whether each is appropriate. To do so, it examines previous attempts to define the scope of procedure in private international law, considers alternative choice of law methods for referring matters to the law of forum, and examines the influence of the doctrine of characterization on procedure. Substance and Procedure in Private International Law also provides detailed analysis of the decisional law in which the substance-procedure distinction has been employed, creating a clear assessment of its application in various practical situations and providing valuable guidance for practitioners on how the distinction should be applied. The book also considers 'procedural' topics such as service of process and the taking of evidence abroad, in order to show how the application of forum law may further be limited by foreign laws. With a foreword by the Hon Sir Anthony Mason.

Freedom of Establishment and Private International Law for Corporations

OXFORD PRIVATE INTERNATIONAL LAW SERIES General Editor: James J. Fawcett The aim of the series is to publish work of ... ALSO IN THIS SERIES Substance and Procedure in Private International Law RICHARD GARNETT Employment Contracts in ...

Freedom of Establishment and Private International Law for Corporations

Freedom of establishment is one of the four fundamental freedoms of the European Union. The principle is that natural persons who are European Union Citizens, and legal entities formed in accordance with the law of a Member State and having its registered office, central administration or principal place of business within the EU, may take up economic activity in any Member State in a stable and continuous form regardless of nationality or mode of incorporation. This book examines the way in which EU law has influenced how national courts in Europe assert jurisdiction in cross-border corporate disputes and insolvencies, and the mechanism which allows them to decide which national law should apply to the substance of the dispute. The book also considers the potential for EU Member States to compete for devising national corporate and insolvency legislation that will attract incorporations or insolvencies. Central to the book is the concept of national choice of law. In considering the impact of freedom of establishment on private international law for corporations, the book uniquely analyses both corporate and insolvency law together, presenting the topic in the broadest possible sense. Importantly, the doctrine of abuse in corporate and insolvency law is covered, raising the question of 'forum shopping' and regulatory competition which underpins the intersection between freedom of establishment and private international law. Through examination of the most recent and leading judgments of the European Court of Justice in Centros and Cadbury Schweppes, the book derives certain conclusions as to the operation of the doctrine of abuse and the limits thereof in the context of freedom of establishment. Being the first in the field to examine the leading ECJ cases of Inspire Art, Sevic and Cartesio regarding the real seat doctrine, the book makes the judgment that there is no incompatibility as such between the doctrine and the freedom of establishment. Ultimately, the book analyses to what extent diversity in the corporate and insolvency laws of the Member States should be preserved, so as to encourage competition between jurisdictions in Europe.

The Nature and Enforcement of Choice of Court Agreements

Substance and Procedure in Private International Law (Oxford, Oxford Private International Law Series, Oxford University Press, 2012). ——'Jurisdiction Clauses since Akai' [2013] University of Melbourne Law School Research Series 6.

The Nature and Enforcement of Choice of Court Agreements

PRAISE FOR THE BOOK: "This constitutes a work of impressive scholarship that will become a major reference point for future discourse on choice of court agreements. Dr Ahmed advances a firm thesis in a lucid manner that will satisfy both academics and practitioners. The discussion is supported by a monumental foundation of underpinning research. Ahmed's monograph throughout shows clear understanding of underlying substantive laws and in Chapter 11 displays a refreshing willingness to engage in intelligent speculation on the implications of Brexit." Professor David Milman, University of Lancaster "The book is an excellent attempt to understand the theoretical underpinnings of choice of court agreements in private international law ... Anyone with an interest in the theory and practice of choice of court agreements, in particular in mechanisms for their enforcement, should read this book. They will find much of value by doing so." Professor Paul Beaumont, University of Aberdeen (from the Series Editor's Preface) This book examines the fundamental juridical nature, classification and enforcement of choice of court agreements in international commercial litigation. It is the first full-length attempt to integrate the comparative and doctrinal analysis of choice of court agreements under the Brussels I Recast Regulation, the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements ('Hague Convention') and the English common law jurisdictional regime into a theoretical framework. In this regard, the book analyses the impact of a multilateral and regulatory conception of private international law on the private law enforcement of choice of court agreements before the English courts. In the process, it both pre-empts and offers innovative solutions to issues that may arise under the jurisprudence of the emergent Brussels I Recast Regulation and the Hague Convention. The need to understand the nature and enforcement of choice of court agreements before the English courts from the perspective of the EU private international law regime and the Hague Convention cannot be understated. This important new study aims to fill an existing gap in the literature in relation to an account of choice of court agreements which explores and reconnects arguments drawn from international legal theory with legal practice. However, the scope of the work remains most relevant for cross-border commercial lawyers interested in crafting pragmatic solutions to the conflicts of jurisdictions.

A Guide to Global Private International Law

The distinction between substance and procedure forms part of all major systems of private international law.1 Matters of procedure are governed by the law of the forum and matters of substance are subjected to the law of the cause of ...

A Guide to Global Private International Law

This book provides a substantial overview of the discipline of private international law viewed from a global perspective. The guide is divided into 4 key sections. Theory Institutional and Conceptual Framework Issues Civil and Commercial Law (apart from Family Law) Family Law Each chapter is written by a leading expert(s). The chapters address specific areas/aspects of private international law and consider the existing global solutions and the possibilities of improving/creating them. Where appropriate, the chapters are co-authored by experts from different legal perspectives in order to achieve as balanced a picture as possible. The range of contributions includes authors from Europe, North America, Latin America, Africa, Asia and Oceania. An essential resource for academics, practitioners and students alike.

Indian Private International Law

Laws. I. Introduction. A, an Indian-domiciled citizen, entered into a contract with B, a Bangladesh-domiciled citizen, ... 1 RGarnett, Substance and Procedure in Private International Law (Oxford University Press, 2012) 1, 5–6; ...

Indian Private International Law

This book provides an authoritative account of the evolution and application of private international law principles in India in civil commercial and family matters. Through a structured evaluation of the legislative and judicial decisions, the authors examine the private international law in the Republic and whether it conforms to international standards and best practices as adopted in major jurisdictions such as the European Union, the United Kingdom, the United States, India's BRICS partners - Brazil, Russia, China and South Africa and other common law systems such as Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and Nepal. Divided into 13 chapters, the book provides a contextualised understanding of legal transformation on key aspects of the Indian conflict-of-law rules on jurisdiction, applicable law and the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments or arbitral awards. Particularly fascinating in this regard is the discussion and focus on both traditional and contemporary areas of private international law, including marriage, divorce, contractual concerns, the fourth industrial revolution, product liability, e-commerce, intellectual property, child custody, surrogacy and the complicated interface of 'Sharia' in the conflict-of-law framework. The book deliberates the nuanced perspective of endorsing the Hague Conference on Private International Law instruments favouring enhanced uniformity and predictability in matters of choice of court, applicable law and the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments. The book's international and comparative focus makes it eminently resourceful for legislators, the judges of Indian courts and other interested parties such as lawyers and litigants when they are confronted with cross-border disputes that involve an examination of India's private international law. The book also provides a comprehensive understanding of Indian private international law, which will be useful for academics and researchers looking for an in-depth discussion on the subject.

International Intellectual Property and the ASEAN Way

His publications include Substance and Procedure in Private International Law in the Oxford Private International Law Series. Since 2004, he has served as an expert member of the Australian government delegation to the Hague Conference ...

International Intellectual Property and the ASEAN Way

Presents a unique interoperability model for regional and international integration of intellectual property laws based on cooperation the ASEAN Way.

Boundaries of European Private International Law

11. Quoting Dicey in L. COLLINS, Dicey, Morris and Collins on the Conflict of Laws, London, Sweet & Maxwell, 15th ed., 2012, p. 203, note 4. 12. Vid. R. GARNETT, Substance and Procedure in Private International Law, Oxford, ...

Boundaries of European Private International Law

European private international law is by now based mainly on a large body of uniform rules such as the Regulations Rome I, Rome II, Brussels I, Brussels I bis. This significant legislative output, however, does not take place in a vacuum. Rules of private international law have been earlier (and still are) adopted at national, international and even European level in scattered regulations and directives. The recent plethora of private international law rules gives rise to issues of delineation and calls for some sort of ordering as gaps, overlaps and contradictions become flagrant. At the same time, the resulting interactions can offer new insight, ideas and even opportunities at a more theoretical level. This book gathers a collection of essays resulting out of a series of international seminars held in Lyon, Barcelona and Louvain-la-Neuve. During those seminars, young researchers selected in an open call for papers had the opportunity to discuss their views among themselves as well as with various specialists of the field, such as more senior academics, EU civil servants, national experts and representatives of other international organisations. The book offers the fresh views of those who will in the future shape the dialectic between the various sources of private international law and attempts to launch a discussion on the “living together” of legal sources. Two ranges of topics are addressed in the book: - firstly, the relationship between EU private international law and national law (substantial and procedural) and/or international law (international instruments of private international law or of uniform substantive law); and - secondly, the relationship between EU private international law and other aspects of EU law (internal market rules of primary law, harmonisation through secondary law and other pieces of legislation enacted in the realm of the area of freedom, security and justice).

Freezing Injunctions in Private International Law

69 limits of operation of local and foreign laws bearing the character of public law, but the latter can be taken into account as a fact or datum. ... Substance and Procedure in Private International Law (Oxford University Press, 2012).

Freezing Injunctions in Private International Law

The extent of available pre-judgment asset preservation relief is widely regarded as a unique characteristic of English law and one of the key factors attracting international commercial litigation to the English courts. By taking a novel view of the theoretical foundations of a freezing injunction, this book challenges the long-established view that such an injunction is an in personam form of relief whose sole purpose is to prevent unscrupulous defendants from making themselves judgment-proof. Dr Šaranović combines historical and comparative perspectives to identify several theoretical flaws in the court's jurisdiction to grant this popular form of interim relief. The book demonstrates that the current application of private international law rules in this field leads to inequality among litigants and illegitimate encroachment upon the sovereignty of foreign states. It proposes a range of possible solutions to alleviate concerns about the scope of freezing injunctions both in the domestic and international arena.

Arbitration and Dispute Resolution in the Resources Sector

In 2012, Professor Garnett published the book Substance and Procedure in Private International Law in the prestigious Oxford Private International Law Series, which is the first major work on the subject in English. From 2004 to 2005, ...

Arbitration and Dispute Resolution in the Resources Sector

This book provides a comprehensive Australian perspective on the resolution of resources disputes. In particular, it focuses on the use of arbitration, mediation and adjudication in the resources sector. It concentrates on arbitration as the preferred method of dispute resolution, including international commercial and investor-state arbitration. The book offers fascinating insights into the use of arbitration to investment disputes involving resources companies in the African OHADA countries, Australia and other countries. It offers an Australian perspective which will be useful to discerning arbitration scholars and dispute resolvers. In addition, the book provides useful information on how to draft arbitration clauses for resources sector contracts. This publication will be of interest to members of the academic research community and will also appeal to dispute resolution professionals and practitioners.

Procedure and Evidence in International Arbitration

7-002; George Panagopoulos, 'Substance and Procedure in Private International Law', Journal of Private International Law 1, no. 1 (2005): 69. ... See, e.g., Adrian Briggs, Conflict of Laws (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008), 42–43.

Procedure and Evidence in International Arbitration

Central to the book’s purpose is the procedural challenge facing arbitrators at each and every stage of the arbitral process when fairness arguments conflict with efficiency concerns and trade-offs must be determined. Some key themes include how can a tribunal be fair, and in particular be neutral, if parties are so diverse? How can arbitration be made efficient and cost-effective without undue inroads into fairness and accuracy? How does a tribunal do what is best if the parties are choosing a suboptimal process? When can or must an arbitrator ignore procedural choices made by the parties? The author thoroughly evaluates competing arguments and adds his own practical tips, expertly synthesizing and engaging with the conference literature and differing authors’ views. He identifies criteria that offer a harmonized approach to each stage of the arbitral process, with particular attention to such aspects of international arbitration as: appropriate trade-offs between flexibility and certainty; the rights, duties and powers of arbitrators; appointment and challenge of arbitrators; responses to ‘guerilla’ tactics; drafting of arbitration agreements, including specialty clauses; drafting of required commencement notices and response documents; set-off; fast track arbitration and other efficiency options; strategic use of preliminary conferences and timetabling; online arbitration; multi-party, multi-contract, class arbitration; amicus and third party funders; pre-arbitral referees and interim relief; witness evidence, both factual and expert; documentary evidence, production obligations, and challenges to production; identifying applicable law; and remedies and costs.

Chinese Private International Law

See also R Garnett, Substance and procedure in private international law (Oxford University Press, 2012) 2.01–2.03. EJ Janger, 'Silos: Establishing the Distributional Baseline in Cross-Border Bankruptcies' (2014) 9 Brooklyn Journal of ...

Chinese Private International Law

Written with the assistance of a team of lecturers at the Shanghai University of Political Science and Law, this book is the leading reference on Chinese private international law in English. The chapters systematically cover the whole of Chinese private international law, not just questions likely to arise in commercial matters, but also in family, succession, cross-border insolvency, intellectual property, competition (antitrust), and environmental disputes. The chapters do not merely cover the traditional conflict of law areas of jurisdiction, applicable law (choice of law), and enforcement. They also look into conflict of law questions arising in arbitration and assess China's involvement in the harmonisation of private international law globally and regionally within the Belt and Road Initiative. Similarly to the Japanese and Indonesian volumes in the Series, this book presents Chinese conflict of laws through a combination of common and civil law analytical techniques and perspectives, providing readers worldwide with a more profound and comprehensive understanding of Chinese private international law.

The Oxford Handbook of Jurisdiction in International Law

It would be less clear how to analyse a case in which a court applied a foreign law in circumstances which were ... See generally e.g. Richard Garnett, Substance and Procedure in Private International Law (Oxford University Press, ...

The Oxford Handbook of Jurisdiction in International Law

The Oxford Handbook of Jurisdiction in International Law provides an authoritative and comprehensive analysis of the concept of jurisdiction in international law. Jurisdiction plays a fundamental role in international law, limiting the exercise of legal authority over international legal subjects. But despite its importance, the concept has remained, until now, underdeveloped. Discussions of jurisdiction in international law regularly refer to classic heads of jurisdiction based on territoriality or nationality, or use the SS Lotus decision of the Permanent Court of International Justice as a starting point. However, traditional understandings of jurisdiction are facing new challenges. Globalization has increased the need for jurisdiction to be applied extraterritorially, non-State forms of law provide new theoretical challenges and intersections between different forms of jurisdiction have become more intricate. This Handbook provides a necessary re-examination of the concept of jurisdiction in international law through a thematic analysis of its history, its contemporary application, and how it needs to adapt to encompass future developments in international law. It examines some of the most contentious elements of jurisdiction by considering how the concept is being applied in specific substantive and institutional settings.

The European Private International Law of Employment

Francq, S., 'The Scope of Secondary Community Law in the Light of the Methods of Private International Law – or the Other Way Around? ... Garnett, R., Substance and Procedure in Private International Law (Oxford University Press, 2012).

The European Private International Law of Employment

The European Private International Law of Employment provides a descriptive and normative account of the European rules of jurisdiction and choice of law which frame international employment litigation in the courts of EU Member States. The author outlines the relevant rules of the Brussels I Regulation Recast, the Rome Regulations, the Posted Workers Directive and the draft of the Posting of Workers Enforcement Directive, and assesses those rules in light of the objective of protection of employees. By using the UK as a case study, he also highlights the impact of the 'Europeanisation' of private international law on traditional perceptions and rules in this field of law in individual Member States. For example, the author demonstrates that the private international law of the EU is fundamentally reshaping English conflict of laws by almost completely merging the traditionally perceived contractual, statutory and tortious claims into one claim for choice-of-law purposes.

European Private International Law

16 17 20 21 22 International Law and the Internet (Alphen aan den Rijn, Kluwer, 2016). ... 19 See generally G Panagopoulos, 'Substance and Procedure in Private International Law' (2005) 1 Journal of Private International Law 69–92.

European Private International Law

This classic textbook provides a thorough overview of European private international law. It is essential reading for private international law students who need to study the European perspective in order to fully get to grips the subject. Opening with foundational questions, it clearly explains the subject's central tenets: the Brussels I, Rome I and Rome II Regulations (jurisdiction, applicable law for contracts and tort). Additional chapters explore the Succession Regulation, private international law and insolvency, freedom of establishment, and the impact of PIL on corporate social responsibility. The new edition includes a new chapter on the Hague instruments and an opening discussion on the impact of Brexit. Drawing on the author's rich experience, the new edition retains the book's hallmarks of insight and clarity of expression ensuring it maintains its position as the leading textbook in the field.

Australian Private International Law for the 21st Century

5 Sir A Mason, Foreword to R Garnett, Substance and Procedure in Private International Law (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2012) ix. 6 See eg Succession Act 2006 (NSW) ss 48–50. 7 Phillips v Eyre (1870) LR 6 QB 1.

Australian Private International Law for the 21st Century

A nation's prosperity depends not only on the willingness of its businesses to export goods and services, and of its citizens and residents to travel to take advantage of opportunities overseas, but also on the willingness of the businesses and citizens of other nations to cross the nation's borders to do business. Economic expansion, and parallel increases in tourism and immigration, have brought Australians more frequently into contact with the laws and legal systems of other nations. In particular, in recent years, trade with partners in the Asia-Pacific Region has become increasingly important to the nation's future. At the same time, Australian courts are faced with a growing number of disputes involving foreign facts and parties. In recognition of these developments, and the need to ensure that the applicable rules meet the needs both of transacting parties and society, the Attorney-General's Department launched in 2012 a full review of Australian rules of private international law. This collection examines the state and future of Australian private international law against the background of the Attorney-General's review. The contributors approach the topic from a variety of perspectives (judge, policy maker, practitioner, academic) and with practical and theoretical insights as to operation of private international law rules in Australia and other legal systems.

The Arrest of Ships in Private International Law

... 'Substance and Procedure in the Conflict of Laws: A Continuing Debate in Relation to Damages' (2004) 53 International and Comparative Law Quarterly 691 —— The Transfer of Property in the Conflict of Laws (OUP Oxford 2005) —— (and EB ...

The Arrest of Ships in Private International Law

Analysing the arrest of ships in English and Scots law in the light of the international conventions in the field this book examines the protective, security, and jurisdictional functions of arrest within the three classical domains of private international law: applicable law, jurisdiction, and the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments.

Forum Shopping Despite Unification of Law

This is due to these uniform private international law rules merely addressing very narrow issues. ... D. K. Anton, “Book Review: R. Garnett, Substance and Procedure in Private International Law, Oxford (2012)”, ...

Forum Shopping Despite Unification of Law

According to some commentators, forum shopping is an “evil” that must be eradicated. It has been suggested that the unification of substantive law through international conventions constitutes one way to achieve this outcome. This book shows that the drafting of uniform substantive law convention cannot prevent forum shopping. The reasons are classified into two main categories: convention-extrinsic and convention-intrinsic reasons. The former category comprises those reasons upon which uniform substantive law conventions do not have an impact at all. These reasons range from the costs of access to justice to the bias of potential adjudicators to the enforceability of judgments. The convention-intrinsic reasons, on the other hand, are reasons that relate to the nature and design of uniform substantive law conventions, and include their limited substantive and international spheres of application as well as their limited scope of application, the need to provide for reservations, etc. This book also focuses on another reason why forum shopping cannot be overcome: the impossibility of ensuring uniform applications and interpretations of the various uniform substantive law conventions.

Evidential Legal Reasoning

American Conflicts Law, 6th ed., Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press. Garnett, R. (2012). Substance and Procedure in Private International Law. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Herzog, P. and Weser, M. (1967). Civil Procedure in France.

Evidential Legal Reasoning

A global overview of evidentiary reasoning with contributions from leading authorities from different legal traditions and four continents.