The Suburban Christian

Finding Spiritual Vitality in the Land of Plenty

The Suburban Christian

Explores the social and economic forces that created the suburbs, and examines what it means to live Christianly in this setting, offering suggestions for integrating faith into suburban life.

The New Suburban History

The New Suburban History

America has become a nation of suburbs. Confronting the popular image of suburbia as simply a refuge for affluent whites, The New Suburban History rejects the stereotypes of a conformist and conflict-free suburbia. The seemingly calm streets of suburbia were, in fact, battlegrounds over race, class, and politics. With this collection, Kevin Kruse and Thomas Sugrue argue that suburbia must be understood as a central factor in the modern American experience. Kruse and Sugrue here collect ten essays—augmented by their provocative introduction—that challenge our understanding of suburbia. Drawing from original research on suburbs across the country, the contributors recast important political and social issues in the context of suburbanization. Their essays reveal the role suburbs have played in the transformation of American liberalism and conservatism; the contentious politics of race, class, and ethnicity; and debates about the environment, land use, and taxation. The contributors move the history of African Americans, Latinos, Asians, and blue-collar workers from the margins to the mainstream of suburban history. From this broad perspective, these innovative historians explore the way suburbs affect—and are affected by—central cities, competing suburbs, and entire regions. The results, they show, are far-reaching: the emergence of a suburban America has reshaped national politics, fostered new social movements, and remade the American landscape. The New Suburban History offers nothing less than a new American history—one that claims the nation cannot be fully understood without a history of American suburbs at its very center.

Considering Alan Ball

Essays on Sexuality, Death and America in the Television and Film Writings

Considering Alan Ball

Academy Award-winning screenwriter of the film American Beauty and creator of the HBO series Six Feet Under, Alan Ball has consistently probed the cultural forces shaping gender, sexuality, and death in the United States. Through gritty dialogue and edgy humor, Ball centers much of his social critique on the illusory promises of the American Dream. For many of his characters, a belief in the American Dream—including idealized notions of the family, heterosexual norms, and the acceptance of prescribed gender roles—proves stifling and self-destructive. This is the first book to explore Ball’s writings for theater, television and film, with an emphasis on his best-known work. These essays offer insight into both the captivating and problematic dimensions of Ball’s work, while drawing connections among his diverse writings. An interview with Ball is included.

Recent Developments in Functional Discourse Grammar

Recent Developments in Functional Discourse Grammar

This volume presents a collection of papers using the theory of Functional Discourse Grammar (FDG) to analyse and explain a number of specific constructions or phenomena (external possessor contructions and binominal constructions, negation, modification, modality, polysynthesis and transparency) from different perspectives, language-specific, comparative and typological. In addition to applying the theory to the topics in question, these papers aim to contribute to the further development of the theory by modifying and extending it on the basis of new linguistic evidence from a range of languages, thus providing the latest state-of-the-art in FDG. The volume as a whole, however, does more than this, as separately and together the papers collected here aim to demonstrate how FDG, with its unique architecture, can provide new insights into a number of issues and phenomena that are currently of interest to theoretical linguists in general.

The Promise of the Suburbs

A Victorian History in Literature and Culture

The Promise of the Suburbs

A study of the fast-growing Victorian suburbs as places of connection, creativity, and professional advance, especially for women From the earliest decades of the nineteenth century, the suburbs were maligned by the aristocratic elite as dull zones of low cultural ambition and vulgarity, as well as generally female spaces isolated from the consequential male world of commerce. Sarah Bilston argues that these attitudes were forged to undermine the cultural authority of the emerging middle class and to reinforce patriarchy by trivializing women’s work. Resisting these stereotypes, Bilston reveals how suburban life offered ambitious women, especially women writers, access to supportive communities and opportunities for literary and artistic experimentation as well as professional advancement. From more familiar figures such as the sensation author Mary Elizabeth Braddon to interior design journalist Jane Ellen Panton and garden writer Jane Loudon, this work presents a more complicated portrait of how women and English society at large navigated a fast-growing, rapidly changing landscape.

John Fawcett's Ginger Snaps

John Fawcett's Ginger Snaps

Few studies of Canadian cinema to date have engaged deeply with genre cinema and its connection to Canadian culture. Ernest Mathijs does just that in this volume, which traces the inception, production, and reception of Canada’s internationally renowned horror film, Ginger Snaps (2000). This tongue-in-cheek Gothic film, which centres on two death-obsessed teenage sisters, draws a provocative connection between werewolf monstrosity and female adolescence and boasts a dedicated world-wide fan base. The first book-length study of this popular film, John Fawcett’s Ginger Snaps is based on the author’s privileged access to most of its cast and crew and to its enthusiasts around the world. Examining themes of genre, feminism, identity, and adolescent belonging, Mathijs concludes that Ginger Snaps deserves to be recognized as part of the Canadian canon, and that it is a model example of the kind of crossover cult film that remains unjustly undervalued by film scholars.

Paradise

Paradise

A hurricane sweeps across southern Sweden, leaving chaos in its wake. Two men lie dead in Stockholm's Free Port, shot in the head at point-blank range. A young woman runs for her life. She finds refuge in Paradise, a foundation dedicated to people whose lives are in danger. Newpaper sub-editor Annika Bengtzon is trying to piece her life together following the violent death of her fiance. Covering the story of Paradise is the opening she needs to get her personal life and her career back on track. But, as she's about to find out, neither Paradise nor the young woman, Aida, are quite what they appear to be. Annika's quest for the truth will force both her and Aida to confront their troubled pasts - and ultimately Annika will be faced with the most difficult decision of her life.

Rock Climbing the San Francisco Bay Area

Rock Climbing the San Francisco Bay Area

Rock Climbing the San Francisco Bay Area offers options for multiple ascents in more than 20 areas around the San Francisco Bay. In addition to the nuts and bolts of routes and ratings, information on coffee shops, and brewpubs, and other amenities in each area is included, along with notes on where rock climbers can take their four-footed climbing partners. Photographs, topos, and maps accompany the text.

Lewis

Lewis

Can a man who's spent his life forgetting all that he doesn't want to consider find his way back to the road he's taken? Lewis Melton, infamous writer and educator, needs to find out before it kills him, and he won't get much help from all of those he betrayed. Lewis Melton is easy to please: a sunny beach, the right meds, and a continuation of his life as a literary icon of small and fading repute. He has learned to forget any unpleasant thoughts - how could he not be happy? He finds out, when a dead friend from the Sixties breaks into his house, terrorizes his ex-wife, and tries to run Lewis down in his own driveway. His old friend, not so dead after all, wants answers and revenge, while Lewis, on the run, must figure out why.

Feeling Sorry for Celia

A Novel

Feeling Sorry for Celia

A #1 Bestseller in Australia and Book Sense 76 Pick Life is pretty complicated for Elizabeth Clarry. Her best friend Celia keeps disappearing, her absent father suddenly reappears, and her communication with her mother consists entirely of wacky notes left on the fridge. On top of everything else, because her English teacher wants to rekindle the "Joy of the Envelope," a Complete and Utter Stranger knows more about Elizabeth than anyone else. But Elizabeth is on the verge of some major changes. She may lose her best friend, find a wonderful new friend, kiss the sexiest guy alive, and run in a marathon. So much can happen in the time it takes to write a letter... A #1 bestseller in Australia, this fabulous debut is a funny, touching, revealing story written entirely in the form of letters, messages, postcards—and bizarre missives from imaginary organizations like The Cold Hard Truth Association. Feeling Sorry for Celia captures, with rare acuity, female friendship and the bonding and parting that occurs as we grow. Jaclyn Moriarty's hilariously candid novel shows that the roller coaster ride of being a teenager is every bit as fun as we remember—and every bit as harrowing.