A Superior Death (Anna Pigeon Mysteries, Book 2)

A thrilling adventure of the American wilderness

A Superior Death (Anna Pigeon Mysteries, Book 2)

Sunken treasure comes at a deadly price... Park ranger Anna Pigeon returns in Nevada Barr's A Superior Death, a mystery that unfolds in and around Lake Superior. Perfect for fans of Sue Grafton and Janet Evanovich. 'Nevada Barr is one of the best' - Boston Globe Trying to keep America's pristine wilderness untouched is no easy job for park ranger Anna Pigeon. It's lonely work, but her unyielding love of nature makes her well-suited for it - especially when murder mars the scene... A self-avowed 'desert rat', Anna finds herself out of her element when she is reassigned to Isle Royale National Park on the North Shore of Lake Superior. Below the frigid waters lies the Kamloops, a sunken 1927 ship - the final resting place of its five victims. But when divers surface with a tale of seeing a sixth body, Anna must break the Great Lake's grip on its icy secrets... What readers are saying about A Superior Death: 'Fantastic, brilliant, glorious' 'Well-constructed mystery which keeps you guessing until the end' 'Five stars'

Cradle to Grave : Life, Work, and Death at the Lake Superior Copper Mines

Life, Work, and Death at the Lake Superior Copper Mines

Cradle to Grave : Life, Work, and Death at the Lake Superior Copper Mines

Concentrating on technology, economics, labor, and social history, Cradle to Grave documents the full life cycle of one of America's great mineral ranges from the 1840s to the 1960s. Lankton examines the workers' world underground, but is equally concerned with the mining communities on the surface. For the first fifty years of development, these mining communities remained remarkably harmonious, even while new, large companies obliterated traditional forms of organization and work within the industry. By 1890, however, the Lake Superior copper industry of upper Michigan started facing many challenges, including strong economic competition and a declining profit margin; growing worker dissatisfaction with both living and working conditions; and erosion of the companies' hegemony in a district they once controlled. Lankton traces technological changes within the mines and provides a thorough investigation of mine accidents and safety. He then focuses on social and labor history, dealing especially with the issue of how company paternalism exerted social control over the work force. A social history of technology, Cradle to Grave will appeal to labor, social and business historians.

Death was His Kooan

The Samurai-zen of Suzuki Shoosan

Death was His Kooan

Biography and views of Shosan (1579-1655), a samurai turned Zen Buddhist monk, by a noted scholar.

Symbolic Exchange and Death

Symbolic Exchange and Death

Jean Baudrillard is one of the most celebrated and most controversial of contemporary social theorists. This major work occupies a central place in the rethinking of the humanities and social sciences around the idea of postmodernism. It leads the reader on an exhilarating tour encompassing the end of Marxism, the enchantment of fashion, symbolism about sex and the body, and the relations between economic exchange and death. Most significantly, the book represents Baudrillard's fullest elaboration of the concept of the three orders of the simulacra, defining the historical passage from production to reproduction to simulation. A classic in its field, Symbolic Exchange and Death is a key source for the redefinition of contemporary social thought. Baudrillard's critical gaze appraises social theories as diverse as cybernetics, ethnography, psychoanalysis, feminism, Marxism, communications theory and semiotics. This English translation begins with a new introductory essay.

Mentats of Dune

Book Two of the Schools of Dune Trilogy

Mentats of Dune

In Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson's Mentats of Dune, the thinking machines have been defeated but the struggle for humanity's future continues. Gilbertus Albans has founded the Mentat School, a place where humans can learn the efficient techniques of thinking machines. But Gilbertus walks an uneasy line between his own convictions and compromises in order to survive the Butlerian fanatics, led by the madman Manford Torondo and his Swordmaster Anari Idaho. Mother Superior Raquella attempts to rebuild her Sisterhood School on Wallach IX, with her most talented and ambitious student, Valya Harkonnen, who also has another goal—to exact revenge on Vorian Atreides, the legendary hero of the Jihad, whom she blames for her family's downfall. Meanwhile, Josef Venport conducts his own war against the Butlerians. VenHold Spacing Fleet controls nearly all commerce thanks to the superior mutated Navigators that Venport has created, and he places a ruthless embargo on any planet that accepts Manford Torondo's anti-technology pledge, hoping to starve them into submission. But fanatics rarely surrender easily . . . The Mentats, the Navigators, and the Sisterhood all strive to improve the human race, but each group knows that as Butlerian fanaticism grows stronger, the battle will be to choose the path of humanity's future—whether to embrace civilization, or to plunge into an endless dark age. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

The Madness of Alexander the Great

And the Myth of Military Genius

The Madness of Alexander the Great

Over the years, some 20,000 books and articles have been written about Alexander the Great, the vast majority hailing him as possibly the greatest general that ever lived. Richard A. Gabriel, however, argues that, while Alexander was clearly a succesful soldier-adventurer, the evidence of real greatness is simply not there. The author presents Alexander as a misfit within his own warrior society, attempting to overcompensate. Thoroughly insecure and unstable, he was given to episodes of uncontrollable rage and committed brutal atrocities that would today have him vilified as a monstrous psychopath. The author believes some of his worst excesses may have been due to what we now call Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, of which he displays many of the classic symptoms, brought on by extended exposure to violence and danger. Above all the author thinks that Alexander's military ability has been flattered by History. Alexander was tactically competent but contributed nothing truly original, while his strategy was often flawed and distorted by his obsession with personal glory. This radical reappraisal is certain to provoke debate.

The Scottish Law Reporter

Continuing Reports ... of Cases Decided in the Court of Session, Court of Justiciary, Court of Teinds, and House of Lords

The Scottish Law Reporter