Surrealism and Women

Speaking with Forked Tongues : " Male " Discourse in " Female " Surrealism ? Robert J. Belton Surrealism is popularly understood as an unreflective indulgence in sub- conscious material , and to some extent it was .

Surrealism and Women

These sixteen illustrated essays present an important revision of surrealism by focusing on the works of women surrealists and their strategies to assert positions as creative subjects within a movement that regarded woman primarily as an object of masculine desire or fear.While the male surrealists attacked aspects of the bourgeois order, they reinforced the traditional patriarchal image of woman. Their emphasis on dreams, automatic writing, and the unconscious reveal some of the least inhibited masculine fantasies. The first resistance to the male surrealists' projection of the female figure arose in the writings and paintings of marginalized woman artists and writers associated with Surrealism. The essays in this collection explore the complexity of these women's works, which simultaneously employ and subvert the dominant discourse of male surrealists. Essays What Do Little Girls Dream Of: The Insurgent Writing of Gis�le Prassinos • Finding What You Are Not Looking For • From D�jeuner en fourrure to Caroline: Meret Oppenheim's Chronicle of Surrealism • Speaking with Forked Tongues: "Male" Discourse in "Female" Surrealism? • Androgyny: Interview with Meret Oppenheim • The Body Subversive: Corporeal Imagery in Carrington, Prassinos, and Mansour • Identity Crises: Joyce Mansour's Narratives • Joyce Mansour and Egyptian Mythology • In the Interim: The Constructivist Surrealism of Kay Sage • The Flight from Passion in Leonora Carrington's Literary Work • Beauty and/Is the Beast: Animal Symbology in the Work of Leonora Carrington, Remedio Varo, and Leonor Fini • Valentine, Andr�, Paul et les autres, or the Surrealization of Valentine Hugo • Refashioning the World to the Image of Female Desire: The Collages of Aube Ell�ou�t • Eileen Agar • Statement by Dorothea Tanning

Automatic Woman

The heart of the book, however, examines the writings of Leonora Carrington and Unica Z_rn, two women in the Surrealist movement whose works, Conley argues, anticipate much contemporary feminist art and theory.

Automatic Woman

Contemporary feminist critics have often described Surrealism as a misogynist movement. In Automatic Woman, Katharine Conley addresses this issue, confirming some feminist allegations while qualifying and overturning others. Through insightfuløanalyses of works by a range of writers and artists, Conley develops a complex view of Surrealist portrayals of Woman. Conley begins with a discussion of the composite image of Woman developed by such early male Surrealists as Andrä Breton, Francis Picabia, and Paul Eluard. She labels that image ?Automatic Woman??a term that comprises views of Woman as provocative and revolutionary but also as a depersonalized object largely devoid of individuality and volition. This analysis largely confirms feminist critiques of Surrealism. The heart of the book, however, examines the writings of Leonora Carrington and Unica Z_rn, two women in the Surrealist movement whose works, Conley argues, anticipate much contemporary feminist art and theory. In concluding, Conley shows how Breton?s own views on women evolved in the course of his long career, arriving at last at a position far more congenial to contemporary feminists. Automatic Woman is distinguished by Katharine Conley?s judicious understanding of how women?and the image of Woman?figured in Surrealism. The book is an important contemporary account of a cultural movement that continues to fascinate, influence, and provoke us.

Women Artists and the Surrealist Movement

This pioneering book stands as the most comprehensive treatment of the lives, ideas and art works of the remarkable group of women who were an essential part of the Surrealist movement.

Women Artists and the Surrealist Movement

This pioneering book stands as the most comprehensive treatment of the lives, ideas and art works of the remarkable group of women who were an essential part of the Surrealist movement. Frida Kahlo, Meret Oppenheim and Dorothea Tanning, among many others, became an embodiment of their age as they struggled towards artistic maturity and their own 'liberation of the spirit' in the context of the Surrealist revolution. Their stories and their achievements are presented here against the background of the turbulent decades of the 1920s, 30s and 40s, and the war that forced Surrealism into exile in New York and Mexico.

Surrealist Women

She opens the book with a succinct summary of surrealism's basic aims and principles, followed by a discussion of the place of gender in the origins of the movement.The texts are organised into historical periods ranging from the 1920s to ...

Surrealist Women

Surrealist Women displays the range and significance of women's contributions to surrealism. Penelope Rosemont, affiliated with the Paris Surrealist Group in the 1960s and now a Chicago poet and painter, has assembled nearly three hundred texts by ninety-six women from twenty-eight countries. She opens the book with a succinct summary of surrealism's basic aims and principles, followed by a discussion of the place of gender in the origins of the movement.The texts are organised into historical periods ranging from the 1920s to the present, with introductions describing trends in the movement for each period; and each surrealist's work is prefaced by a brief biographical statement. Authors include El Allailly, Bruna, Cunard, Carrington, Cesaire, Gauthier, Giovanna, van Hirtum, Kahlo, Levy, Mansour, Mitrani, Pailthorpe, Joyce Peters, Rahon, Svankmajerova, Taub, Zangana>

Fantastic Women

"The female side of Surrealism: in the period from 1930 to the 1960s, women artists from all over the world were involved in the Surrealist movement and created a fantastic universe of images.

Fantastic Women


Photography and Surrealism

Another sociological complaint that surrealists were only or all men is simply wrong, even as a description of the early years. As Penelope Rosemont has pointed out, 'the first women of surrealism have been almost entirely overlooked in ...

Photography and Surrealism

David Bate examines automatism and the photographic image, the Surrealist passion for insanity, ambivalent use of Orientalism, use of Sadean philosophy and the effect of fascism of the Surrealists. The book is illustrated wtih a wide range of surrealist photographs.

A Companion to Dada and Surrealism

“'Women'in Dada: Elsa, Rrose, and Charlie.” In Women in Dada: Essays on Sex, Gender, and Identity, edited by Naomi Sawelson‐Gorse. ... In Surrealism and Women edited by Mary Ann Caws, Rudolf E. Kuenzli, and Gwen Raaberg.

A Companion to Dada and Surrealism

This excellent overview of new research on Dada and Surrealism blends expert synthesis of the latest scholarship with completely new research, offering historical coverage as well as in-depth discussion of thematic areas ranging from criminality to gender. This book provides an excellent overview of new research on Dada and Surrealism from some of the finest established and up-and-coming scholars in the field Offers historical coverage as well as in–depth discussion of thematic areas ranging from criminality to gender One of the first studies to produce global coverage of the two movements, it also includes a section dealing with the critical and cultural aftermath of Dada and Surrealism in the later twentieth century Dada and Surrealism are arguably the most popular areas of modern art, both in the academic and public spheres

Dada and Surrealist Film

As so often in Surrealism , the " woman " comes to stand for a complex set of cultural associations which underscore the driving sexual metaphor of androgyny in Surrealist theory , that is to say the ideal union of the male and female ...

Dada and Surrealist Film

This groundbreaking collection of thirteen original essays analyzes connections between film and two highly influential twentieth-century movements.

Intersections

The essays address work produced in a wide variety of international contexts and across several generations of surrealist production by women closely connected to the surrealist movement or more marginally influenced by it.

Intersections

Demonstrates the significant roles taken by women artists within the history of modern and contemporary art, and expands and redefines conventional conceptions of both surrealist and modernist canons.

Sacred Surrealism Dissidence and International Avant Garde Prose

Whitney Chadwick, 'Leonora Carrington: Evolution of a Feminist Consciousness', Woman's Art Journal, 7, 1 (Spring–Summer 1986), 37. 'Surrealist Women', Surreal Friends ExhibiƟon, Pallant House Gallery, Chichester, UK, June–September 2010 ...

Sacred Surrealism  Dissidence and International Avant Garde Prose

Vivienne Brough-Evans proposes a compelling new way of reevaluating aspects of international surrealism by means of the category of divin fou, and consequently deploys theories of sacred ecstasy as developed by the Collège de Sociologie (1937–39) as a critical tool in shedding new light on the literary oeuvre of non-French writers who worked both within and against a surrealist framework. The minor surrealist genre of prose literature is considered herein, rather than surrealism's mainstay, poetry, with the intention of fracturing preconceptions regarding the medium of surrealist expression. The aim is to explore whether International surrealism can begin to be more fully explained by an occluded strain of 'dissident' surrealist thought that searches outside the self through the affects of ekstasis. Bretonian surrealism is widely discussed in the field of surrealist studies, and there is a need to consider what is left out of surrealist practice when analysed through this Bretonian lens. The Collège de Sociologie and Georges Bataille's theories provide a model of such elements of 'dissident' surrealism, which is used to analyse surrealist or surrealist influenced prose by Alejo Carpentier, Leonora Carrington and Gellu Naum respectively representing postcolonial, feminist and Balkan locutions. The Collège and Bataille's 'dissident' surrealism diverges significantly from the concerns and approach towards the subject explored by surrealism. Using the concept of ekstasis to organise Bataille's theoretical ideas of excess and 'inner experience' and the Collège's thoughts on the sacred it is possible to propose a new way of reading types of International surrealist literature, many of which do not come to the forefront of the surrealist literary oeuvre.

Surrealism Feminism Psychoanalysis

Surrealist Women : An International Anthology . Austin : University of Texas Press , 1998 . Cahun , Claude . “ La “ Salomé d'Oscar Wilde : Les procès Billing et les 47.000 pervertis du Livre Noir , " in Mercure de France , VII , 1918 .

Surrealism  Feminism  Psychoanalysis

Combining historical and cultural methods of analysis with sophisticated theoretical discussions, Natalya Lusty explores how women artists and intellectuals responded to the appropriation of 'the feminine' in Surrealism and psychoanalysis. Reading work by

Mirror Images

Published to accompany exhibition held at the MIT List Center, Cambridge, MA; 9/4 - 28/6 1998.

Mirror Images

Published to accompany exhibition held at the MIT List Center, Cambridge, MA; 9/4 - 28/6 1998.

Studies in Southeast Asian Art

Some of the literature on the unknown and marginalized European women surrealist artists throw light on Hartini's plight as a female artist in Java. In contrast to male surrealists, Raaberg writes, the aim of surrealist women artists is ...

Studies in Southeast Asian Art

This wide-ranging collection of essays examines the arts of Southeast Asia in context. Contributors study the creation, use, and local significance of works of art, illuminating the many complex links between an object's aesthetic qualities and its origins in a community.

Concise Dictionary of Women Artists

Joined London Group, 1933. Affair with Paul Nash, 1935-40. Spent summer of 1937 in Mougins with Nash, Nusch Eluard and Picasso. Included in International Surrealist Exhibition, New Burlington Galleries, London, 193 6; also participated ...

Concise Dictionary of Women Artists

This book includes some 200 complete entries from the award-winning Dictionary of Women Artists, as well as a selection of introductory essays from the main volume.

Rachilde and French Women s Authorship

She also consistently gets lined up with the old guard by virtue of her attack on the surrealists . Rachilde had not always been at odds with the surrealists , however . She had corresponded sympathetically with André Breton ...

Rachilde and French Women s Authorship

Under the assumed name Rachilde, Marguerite Eymery (1860?1953) wrote over sixty works of fiction, drama, poetry, memoir, and criticism, including Monsieur Vänus, one of the most famous examples of decadent fiction. She was closely associated with the literary journal Mercure de France, inspired parts of Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray, and mingled with all the literary lights of the day. Yet for all that, very little has been written about her. Melanie C. Hawthorne corrects this oversight and counters the traditional approach to Rachilde by persuasively portraying this "eccentric" as patently representative of the French women writers of her time and of the social and literary issues they faced. Seen in this light, Rachilde's writing clearly illustrates important questions in feminist literary theory as well as significant features of turn-of-the-century French society. ø Hawthorne arranges her approach to Rachilde around several defining events in the author's life, including the controversial publication of Monsieur Vänus, with its presentation of sex reversals. Weaving back and forth in time, she is able to depict these moments in relation to Rachilde's life, work, and times and to illuminate nineteenth-century publishing practices and rivalries, including authorial manipulations of the market for sexually suggestive literature. The most complete and accurate account yet written of this emblematic author, Hawthorne's work is also the first to situate Rachilde in the broader social contexts and literary currents of her time and of our own.

Prague Capital of the Twentieth Century

William S. Rubin, Dada, Surrealism, and Their Heritage, New York: Museum of Modern Art, 1968. ... Rosemont's excellent anthology, which contains texts by ninety-seven women associated with the surrealist movement, should be essential ...

Prague  Capital of the Twentieth Century

The story of modernity told through a cultural history of twentieth-century Prague Setting out to recover the roots of modernity in the boulevards, interiors, and arcades of the "city of light," Walter Benjamin dubbed Paris "the capital of the nineteenth century." In this eagerly anticipated sequel to his acclaimed Coasts of Bohemia: A Czech History, Derek Sayer argues that Prague could well be seen as the capital of the much darker twentieth century. Ranging across twentieth-century Prague's astonishingly vibrant and always surprising human landscape, this richly illustrated cultural history describes how the city has experienced (and suffered) more ways of being modern than perhaps any other metropolis. Located at the crossroads of struggles between democratic, communist, and fascist visions of the modern world, twentieth-century Prague witnessed revolutions and invasions, national liberation and ethnic cleansing, the Holocaust, show trials, and snuffed-out dreams of "socialism with a human face." Yet between the wars, when Prague was the capital of Europe's most easterly parliamentary democracy, it was also a hotbed of artistic and architectural modernism, and a center of surrealism second only to Paris. Focusing on these years, Sayer explores Prague's spectacular modern buildings, monuments, paintings, books, films, operas, exhibitions, and much more. A place where the utopian fantasies of the century repeatedly unraveled, Prague was tailor-made for surrealist André Breton's "black humor," and Sayer discusses the way the city produced unrivaled connoisseurs of grim comedy, from Franz Kafka and Jaroslav Hasek to Milan Kundera and Václav Havel. A masterful and unforgettable account of a city where an idling flaneur could just as easily be a secret policeman, this book vividly shows why Prague can teach us so much about the twentieth century and what made us who we are.

Mina Loy Twentieth Century Photography and Contemporary Women Poets

70 Echoing Dalí's Surrealist understanding of photography expressed in “Photography as Fact,” Levy identified an exemplary ... Surrealism's notorious obsession with the female body, in both writing and visual art, generates a gendered ...

Mina Loy  Twentieth Century Photography  and Contemporary Women Poets

Mina Loy, Twentieth-Century Photography, and Contemporary Women Poets- Front Cover -- Mina Loy, Twentieth-Century Photography, and Contemporary Women Poets -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Contents -- List of figures -- Acknowledgements -- Permissions -- Introduction -- Notes -- Chapter 1: Loy among the photographers: poetry, perception, and the camera -- Portraits and photographers -- Julien Levy and the modern photograph -- Islands in the Air and the figure of the photographer -- Vision and poetry -- Notes -- Chapter 2: Surrealism and the female body: economies of violence -- Surrealist contexts and contextualized Surrealism -- Surrealist cameras -- Loy and the female body of Surrealism -- The Surrealist mannequin -- Hans Bellmer, bodies, and war -- Notes -- Chapter 3: Portraits of the poor: the Bowery poems and the rise of documentary photography -- The 1930s and the rise of documentary -- Urban documentary and the visual rhetoric of poverty -- Portraits of the poor -- "Hot Cross Bum" and the tabloids: Sequence as portrait -- Notes -- Chapter 4: From patriotism to atrocity: the war poems and photojournalism -- Patriotism and the poetics of the mural photo-exhibit -- The rise of photojournalism -- The female gaze and the gendered body -- Atrocity and the female body -- Photographing the bomb -- Notes -- Chapter 5: Gendering the camera: Kathleen Fraser and Caroline Bergvall -- Kathleen Fraser and visual reassembly: "[T]he screen was carried inside her"--Caroline Bergvall's rearticulated bodies: Photography and the graphic page -- Coda: Looking back to Loy -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index

Reading Claude Cahun s Disavowals

See also the anthology Surrealism and Women, ed. Mary Ann Caws, Rudolf Kuenzli and Gwen Raaberg (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1993); and Caws, “Ladies Shot and Painted: Female Embodiment in Surrealist Art,” in Susan Rubin Suleiman (ed.) ...

Reading Claude Cahun s Disavowals

The first monograph on a Surrealist cult classic, Reading Claude Cahun's Disavowals offers a comprehensive account of Cahun's most important published work, Aveux non avenus (Disavowals), 1930. Jennifer L. Shaw provides an encompassing interpretation of this groundbreaking work, paying careful attention to the complex interrelationship between the photomontages and writings of Aveux non avenus. This study argues that the texts and images of Aveux non avenus not only explore Cahun's own subjectivity, they formulate a trenchant social and cultural critique. Shaw explores how Cahun's work both calls into question the dominant culture of interwar France - with its traditional gender roles, religious conservatism, and pronatalism - and takes to task the era's artistic avant-garde and in particular its models of desire. This volume cuts across the disciplinary boundaries of interwar art studies, demonstrating how one artist's personal exploration intervened in wider contemporary debates about the purpose of art, the role of women in French culture, and the status of homosexuality, in the aftermath of World War I.

Angela Carter and Surrealism

However, although the contributions of these women surrealists have been acknowledged within the movement itself, until relatively recently, many of them have hardly been known beyond it. Until the women's liberation movement of the ...

Angela Carter and Surrealism

In 1972, Angela Carter translated Xavière Gauthier’s ground-breaking feminist critique of the surrealist movement, Surréalisme et sexualité (1971). Although the translation was never published, the project at once confirmed and consolidated Carter’s previous interest in surrealism, representation, gender and desire and aided her formulation of a new surrealist-feminist aesthetic. Carter’s sustained engagement with surrealist aesthetics and politics as well as surrealist scholarship aptly demonstrates what is at stake for feminism at the intersection of avant-garde aesthetics and the representation of women and female desire. Drawing on previously unexplored archival material, such as typescripts, journals, and letters, Anna Watz’s study is the first to trace the full extent to which Carter’s writing was influenced by the surrealist movement and its critical heritage. Watz’s book is an important contribution to scholarship on Angela Carter as well as to contemporary feminist debates on surrealism, and will appeal to scholars across the fields of contemporary British fiction, feminism, and literary and visual surrealism.

Women Artists and Writers

Three recent examples of feminist art historical archaeology in the field of women's modernism are Whitney Chadwick's Women Artists and the Surrealist Movement ( 1985 ) , Women and Surrealism , edited by Mary Ann Caws , Rudolf E.

Women Artists and Writers

In this beautifully illustrated and provocative study, Bridget Elliott and Jo-Ann Wallace reappraise women's literary and artistic contribution to Modernism. An important study in twentieth-century cultural history.In this beautifully illustrated and provocative study, Bridget Elliott and Jo-Ann Wallace reappraise women's literary and artistic contribution to Modernism. Through comparative case studies, including Natalie Barney, Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell and Gertrude Stein, the authors examine the ways in which women responded to Modernism and created their artistic identity, and how their work has been positioned in relation to that of men.Bringing together women's studies, visual arts and literature, Women Writers and Artists makes an important contribution to 20th century cultural history. It puts forward a powerful case against the academic division of cultural production into departments of Art History and English Studies, which has served to marginalize the work of female Modernists.