Survival Fetish

But what people say about you is never the full story, and when the cheers die out Saheer is left with just his anxieties... and his secrets. Survival Fetish keeps its foot pressed on your adrenal gland.

Survival Fetish

Downtown Honolulu is a sniper alley, and Saheer runs it better than anyone. He's a local celebrity for transporting medicine and information across a no-man's land occupied by militias and street gangs. But what people say about you is never the full story, and when the cheers die out Saheer is left with just his anxieties... and his secrets. Survival Fetish keeps its foot pressed on your adrenal gland. From writer Patrick Kindlon (We Can Never Go Home, There's Nothing There, S.H.I.E.L.D.: Quake) and illustrator Antonio Fuso (James Bond), Survival Fetish is a pulse-pounding thrill-ride that mixes political intrigue with deep characters and high octane action. Collects issues 1-5.

Your Choice

... billion people more than half of which live in cities, finding an equilibrium that allows us to exist in harmony with each other and with the resources we have is not an act of untold generosity: it's a strategy for survival. FETISH ...

Your Choice

A humanist, ecological, and technological call to action Change today is happening faster than ever before. We are overwhelmed by new technologies and an excess of information, and we feel that we and what we used to think of as society are being suffocated. Those who drive this change pursue primarily two goals: profit and power. They lure us with clickbait and abuse us as a data pool, reducing our existence to one of human resource and consumer. In doing so they threaten our democracy, our diversity, even our humanity itself. It doesn t have to be like this, thinks humanist and entrepreneur Christopher Peterka. Instead of basing our ambition on purely economic yield, he pleads for a radical new dialogue about being human: Who do we want to be? How do we want to live together as a society? What meaning is our ambition meant to have? We have to consider these questions afresh, because if we don t do so, others will. But this means leaving behind short term solutions, and taking a stance against the current system to throw off the shackles that tie us down. Your Choice is a call to action that encourages us to challenge the status quo and to bring lasting change as progressive optimists.

Wyrd

From Curt Pires , the writer of The Tomorrows , The Fiction , and pop , with art by Antonio Fuso , the artist of Survival Fetish , Clankillers , and James Bond . " I've said that Curt Pires is one of the best new writers in comics for a ...

Wyrd

A gritty and bright fantasy spy thriller starring a suicidal hero who just can't die. Full of color and violence, this mystery stars a depressed hero with an indestructible body and a forgotten past. When the U.S. Government runs up against situations too strange for them to handle alone they only have one asset to call--Pitor Wyrd. Whatever mission needs doing, whatever mystery needs solving, the roguishly handsome Wyrd acts as a one-man black ops team. With each mission, Pitor is brought closer to his mysterious past, each step pointing to the true ramifications of the Nazi's experiments with the occult during the end of World War II. From Curt Pires, the writer of The Tomorrows, The Forevers, and Pop, with art by Antonio Fuso, the artist of Survival Fetish, G. I. Joe: Cobra, and James Bond. Collects Wyrd #1-4

The English Revolution of the Twentieth Century

We have not seen him start or stagger at any fetish , be it called Free Trade Fetish , Survival of the Fittest Fetish , Political Economy , Rights of Property , Progress of Civilisation , Liberty of the Subject , or any other fetish .

The English Revolution of the Twentieth Century


In the Ruins of the Cold War Bunker

Thus the making of a fetish by a fetishist is a psychic survival strategy, which gives the fetishist some sense of meaning if not actual control or resolution: 'By displacing power onto the fetish, the individual gains symbolic control ...

In the Ruins of the Cold War Bunker

This edited collection investigates the ways in which the physical remains of now abandoned military and civil defence bunkers from the Cold War have become the totems and sites of memory.

The Nomadic Object

In his foundational study of the fetish, William Pietz showed that the Portuguese word feitiço (originally meaning 'manufactured' but which, by the sixteenth century, could also be used for ... See also Genge G., “Survival of Images?

The Nomadic Object

A team of renowned scholars examines how sacred art and artefacts responded to the demands of a world stage in the age of reform, demonstrating the significance of religious systems for a global art history.

The Cyber Effect

Chapter 1: The Normalization of a Fetish 22. 22. ... “I've found my niche”: “Felony Convictions Linked to Sexual Fetish “Haunt Me,'” Mlive.com, June 27, 2014. the most common fetishes: M. D. Griffiths, “Survival of the Fetish: A Brief ...

The Cyber Effect

A groundbreaking exploration of how cyberspace is changing the way we think, feel, and behave “A must-read for this moment in time.”—Steven D. Levitt, co-author of Freakonomics • One of the best books of the year—Nature Mary Aiken, the world’s leading expert in forensic cyberpsychology, offers a starting point for all future conversations about how the Internet is shaping development and behavior, societal norms and values, children, safety, privacy, and our perception of the world. Drawing on her own research and extensive experience with law enforcement, Aiken covers a wide range of subjects, from the impact of screens on the developing child to the explosion of teen sexting and the acceleration of compulsive and addictive behaviors online. Aiken provides surprising statistics and incredible-but-true case studies of hidden trends that are shaping our culture and raising troubling questions about where the digital revolution is taking us. Praise for The Cyber Effect “How to guide kids in a hyperconnected world is one of the biggest challenges for today’s parents. Mary Aiken clearly and calmly separates reality from myth. She clearly lays out the issues we really need to be concerned about and calmly instructs us on how to keep our kids safe and healthy in their digital lives.”—Peggy Orenstein, author of the New York Times bestseller Girls & Sex “[A] fresh voice and a uniquely compelling perspective that draws from the murky, fascinating depths of her criminal case file and her insight as a cyber-psychologist . . . This is Aiken’s cyber cri de coeur as a forensic scientist, and she wants everyone on the case.”—The Washington Post “Fascinating . . . If you have children, stop what you are doing and pick up a copy of The Cyber Effect.”—The Times (UK) “An incisive tour of sociotechnology and its discontents.”—Nature “Just as Rachel Carson launched the modern environmental movement with her Silent Spring, Mary Aiken delivers a deeply disturbing, utterly penetrating, and urgently timed investigation into the perils of the largest unregulated social experiment of our time.”—Bob Woodward “Mary Aiken takes us on a fascinating, thought-provoking, and at times scary journey down the rabbit hole to witness how the Internet is changing the human psyche. A must-read for anyone who wants to understand the temptations and tragedies of cyberspace.”—John R. Suler, PhD, author of The Psychology of Cyberspace “Drawing on a fascinating and mind-boggling range of research and knowledge, Mary Aiken has written a great, important book that terrifies then consoles by pointing a way forward so that our experience online might not outstrip our common sense.”—Steven D. Levitt “Having worked with law enforcement groups from INTERPOL and Europol as well as the U.S. government, Aiken knows firsthand how today’s digital tools can be exploited by criminals lurking in the Internet’s Dark Net.”—Newsweek

Fetish

He also writes, immediately before the quotation on page 18: "When the present tense of testimony loses its power to arrest, then the displacements of memory and the indirections of art offer us the image of our psychic survival.

Fetish

In Fetish, Henry Krips draws together Freudian and Marxian insights to provide accounts of fetishism and the gaze that afford new ways of understanding the relation of the individual to the social, of pleasure to desire. He uses discrete cultural artifacts as windows through which to view local instances of the mediation of pleasure and desire, demonstrating that users of cultural objects adapt them to suit their own strategic ends. Ranging widely over texts and cultures, he discusses Hopi initiation rites, Holbein's painting The Ambassadors, Robert Boyle's early scientific manual New Experiments Physico-Chemical, Toni Morrison's Beloved, the popular television series Mystery Science Theatre 3000, and David Cronenberg's film Crash. Jacques Lacan's theory of the gaze and Louis Althusser's theory of ideology frame Krips's perspectives on fetishism and the discourse of perversion, which he considers in light of postcolonial theory, the history of science, screen theory, and, of course, psychoanalysis. What results is a work remarkable for its clear exposition and its sophisticated synthesis of major theorists, its provocative argument that pleasure comes not from attaining desire but rather from moving around its object-cause.

Time fetishes

( 3.2.94-99 ) The possibility of the survival of the world of becoming after doomsday is synonymous with eternal return , and thus with another mode of recovery and survival . But since there are only " bald conclusions " and scant ...

Time fetishes

This work is a reading of the way humans have attempted to talk about the nature of time, in particular the idea of the periodic creation and destruction of the world and the cosmos--eternal recurrence.

Hydrolith 2 Surrealist Research Investigations

We constructed our Survival Kits – some elaborately prepared from beloved fetish objects, some improvised from detritus found on the spot, some individual, some collaborative – and welcomed local ...

Hydrolith 2  Surrealist Research   Investigations

"This second issue of Hydrolith is a continuation of what the first volume started, which was and is to assemble a stimulating selection of exclusively recent work by groups and individuals of the international Surrealist movement, to facilitate intellectual exchange and collaboration, enabling us to concentrate the echoes of our commonalities as well as the shadows of our differences. In so doing, this volume aspires to reduce all manner of distances that exist between us. All works in this book are in English, while many of them are translations from the Dutch, French, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish and Turkish languages." (From the Preface, p. 7)

The Labyrinth of Universality

trary, may be instruments of survival. Similarly, the poem called “Fetish” (69–71), 9 which defence counsel submits as a genuine expression of Adam's being, possesses an “ornamentation of features” distinct from “omen of grace.

The Labyrinth of Universality

Hena Maes-Jelinek is professor emerita of the University of Liege.

Feminizing the Fetish

... as a counterdiscourse to that of the female screen fetish ("her status as spectacle rather than spectator"), ... sexually volatile, politically feminist subject with some chance of survival but little protection against the risk of ...

Feminizing the Fetish

Shoes, gloves, umbrellas, cigars that are not just objects—the topic of fetishism seems both bizarre and inevitable. In this venturesome and provocative book, Emily Apter offers a fresh account of the complex relationship between representation and sexual obsession in turn-of-the-century French culture. Analyzing works by authors in the naturalist and realist traditions as well as making use of documents from a contemporary medical archive, she considers fetishism as a cultural artifact and as a subgenre of realist fiction. Apter traces the web of connections among fin-de-siècle representations of perversion, the fiction of pathology, and the literary case history. She explores in particular the theme of "female fetishism" in the context of the feminine culture of mourning, collecting, and dressing.

Society Against Itself

“Lurking in the background is the question of survival,” he said, sprawling comfortably in a chair in a ... “but in the foreground is what kind of survival, since Antioch really doesn't make a fetish of survival or it would never have ...

Society Against Itself

"Political correctness" involves much more than a restriction of speech. It represents a broad cultural transformation, a shift in the way people understand things and organize their lives; a change in the way meaning is made. The problem addressed in this book is that, for reasons the author explores, some ways of making "meaning" support the creation and maintenance of organization, while others do not. Organizations are cultural products and rely upon psychological roots that go very deep. The basic premise of this book is that organizations are made up of the rules, common understandings, and obligations that "the father" represents, and which are given meaning in the oedipal dynamic. In anti-oedipal psychology, however, they are seen as locuses of deprivation and structures of oppression. Anti-oedipal meaning, then, is geared toward the destruction of organization.

Creativity Imagination Logic

That we—far from all of us—thus transvalue an instrument of survival into a fetish of would-be survivors is taken for a glory, not a handicap. To know, to dare to know regardless of the consequences of knowing, is like taking drugs, ...

Creativity  Imagination  Logic

Originally published in 1973. This final collection of thought by founder of the New School for Social Research in New York, Horace M. Kallen, touches on topics from language to death and from freedom to value. The author’s treatise explores his understanding of logic and existence.

An Unholy Alliance

... hides, skulls, and animals as weather charms or fetishes to bring on rain needed for survival." Fetishes come in all shapes in all times. In "The Fetish and McGwire's Balls" in From Season to Season, Paul Christopher Johnson reminds ...

An Unholy Alliance

An Unholy Alliance offers a dissenting view to the claim by a growing number of scholars that Sports are a new religion. The last few years have seen a spate of books that might be classified by a genre called "Sports Apologetics," that is, arguments defending or celebrating in one way or another the familiar and ongoing alliance in America between sports and religion. Recently, claims have been made by scholars that sports are an authentic religion in and of themselves. They make this startling assertion not by showing connections with the teachings of Buddha, Jesus, Mohammed, or Moses, but by parallels between the rites of modern games and those of preliterate man that were "religious" in nature because they were designed to propitiate powers and to ward off evil for the tribes employing them. In this evocative book, Higgs and Braswell suggest that while sports may often be good things, they are not inherently divine. They do not focus on wide-spread abuse in sports as evidence for their counterargument. Rather, they question the use of mythological parallels from prehistory as justification for viewing sports as a religion.

An Introduction to the History of Religion Routledge Revivals

We may,if we like, call all these things fetishes, as De Brosses andComte didandBastian does. ... made from the suhman,thenitis notthe idolthat is an elaborated fetish, butthefetish thatisthe remnant or survival ofan imitation idol.

An Introduction to the History of Religion  Routledge Revivals

First published in 1902, this book investigates the history and development of early religion from an anthropological perspective. Rather than dealing with religions that grew from the teachings of their original founders, such as Christianity, Islam, and Buddhism, Jevons considers those religions that were practised as a matter of custom and tradition. The title considers such subjects as the supernatural, life and death, animal sacrifice, and the worship of nature. It provides an introduction to the history of religion for students of religion, anthropology and folklore.

Lucifer

And if the negro laid hold of that rabbit's foot the right way , we in read the symbol that he probably did not understand , although he knew the rabbit's hind foot was a good fetish . It shows the survival of intended symbolism , which ...

Lucifer


Nobody Is In Control

By writer Patrick Kindlon (Survival Fetish, We Can Never Go Home, There's Nothing There), artist Paul Tucker (Tet), and hand-lettered by Wallace Ryan. Collects issues 1-4.

Nobody Is In Control

When Richard sees a man run through his yard, he follows him out of concern. This deep in the woods, he must be lost... must be in trouble. Bust soon it's Richard in peril, as this stranger drags him into a deep, twisted web of conspiracy going back hundreds of years. By writer Patrick Kindlon (Survival Fetish, We Can Never Go Home, There's Nothing There), artist Paul Tucker (Tet), and hand-lettered by Wallace Ryan. Collects issues 1-4.

Mother Tongue and Other Tongues

His fetish was money and it was used to deny absence: of father, deprivation, or separation. Money had become his transitional object so that all that mattered was success: another currency for survival. The loss of this fetish meant no ...

Mother Tongue and Other Tongues

We are living in times where the issue of identity and difference has taken on a more defensive hue. The tide is turning towards an inward-looking nostalgia of sameness based on fear rather than on understanding. The experience of hearing another language, the way it is spoken, and being faced with the image of the other is now more complex, imbued with projections of powerlessness, fear, terrorism, and survival. The issue of identity appears to have become even more complex. All cultures are concerned with how we speak and communicate as this represents identity, history, and home. Communication is also essential for survival, both emotionally and socially. The speaking person is an individual but also part of a culture or cultures with dense collective and individual shapes. The issue of identity, that feeling of belonging, is essential, full of possibility, and, at times, very uncomfortable, as it touches the tensions between who we are and who we are becoming. This sits next to more complex historical experiences and memories of languages and cultures being changed or lost or banished due to the colonial, imperial, and regional moves of powerful nations in search of conquest and economic gain. This collection addresses how language affects therapists and their patients, and how it can be understood culturally and therapeutically. Drawn from talks given at the Multi-lingual Psychotherapy Centre (MLPC), the contributors not only bring a therapeutic slant but also their other roles as academics, writers, and artists. These reflections, memories, and stories give a glimpse of the multilingual journey the MLPC has been exploring for over twenty years, and leave much food for thought. The book contains contributions from Cedric Bouet-Willaumez, Giselle China, Patricia Gorringe, Natsu Hattori, Monique Morris, Esti Rimmer, and Edna Sovin.