Survivor

Sam Pivnik is the ultimate survivor from a world that no longer exists. In 1939, on his 13th birthday, Sam Pivnik's life changed forever when the Nazis invaded Poland.

Survivor

Sam Pivnik's life story is a classic testimony of Holocaust survival. In 1939, on his thirteenth birthday, Sam Pivnik's life changed forever when the Nazis invaded Poland. He survived the two ghettoes set up in his home town of Bedzin and six months on Auschwitz's notorious Rampkommando where prisoners were either taken away for entry to the camp or gassing. After this harrowing experience he was sent to work at the brutal Furstengrube mining camp. He could have died on the 'Death March' that took him west as the Third Reich collapsed and he was one of only a handful of people who swam to safety when the Royal Air Force sank the prison ship Cap Arcona, in 1945, mistakenly believing it to be carrying fleeing members of the SS. Now in his eighties, Sam Pivnik tells for the first time the story of his life, a true tale of survival against the most extraordinary odds.

Survivor Auschwitz the Death March and my fight for freedom

The law of the jungle that ruled in Auschwitz-Birkenau and Fiirstengrube had now spread to this train. We fought and jostled, punching, gouging, kicking with the desperate energy of the starving. It was literally survival of the fittest ...

Survivor  Auschwitz  the Death March and my fight for freedom

**For fans of The Tattooist of Auschwitz** Sam Pivnik is the ultimate survivor from a world that no longer exists. On fourteen occasions he should have been killed, but luck, his physical strength and his determination not to die all played a part in Sam Pivnik living to tell his extraordinary life story. In 1939, on his thirteenth birthday, his life changed forever when the Nazis invaded Poland. He survived the two ghettoes set up in his home town of Bedzin and six months on Auschwitz's notorious Rampkommando where prisoners were either taken away for entry to the camp or gassing. After this harrowing experience he was sent to work at the brutal Furstengrube mining camp. He could have died on the 'Death March' that took him west as the Third Reich collapsed and he was one of only a handful of people who swam to safety when the Royal Air Force sank the prison ship Cap Arcona, in 1945, mistakenly believing it to be carrying fleeing members of the SS. He eventually made his way to London where he found people too preoccupied with their own wartime experiences on the Home Front to be interested in what had happened to him. Now in his eighties, Sam Pivnik tells for the first time the story of his life, a true tale of survival against the most extraordinary odds.

The Holocaust An Encyclopedia and Document Collection 4 volumes

into the Jewish ghetto at Bƒdzin, and on October 6they were deported to the Auschwitz death camp, where his mother, father, three brothers, ... Pivnik published Survivor: Auschwitz, the Death March, and My Fight for Freedom in 2012.

The Holocaust  An Encyclopedia and Document Collection  4 volumes

This four-volume set provides reference entries, primary documents, and personal accounts from individuals who lived through the Holocaust that allow readers to better understand the cultural, political, and economic motivations that spurred the Final Solution. • Provides an easily readable encyclopedic collection of secondary source materials, such as reference entries, maps, and tables, that offer a breadth of content for understanding the Holocaust • Examines a broad range of themes relating to the Holocaust, enabling readers to consider important questions about the historical experience and its implications for today • Includes two volumes of primary source material that introduce users to the cultural, political, and economic motivations that spurred the Final Solution • Presents memoirs and personal narratives that showcase the experiences of survivors and resistors who lived through the chaos and horror of the Final Solution • Includes a comprehensive bibliography that serves as a gateway to further research

Jewish Masculinity in the Holocaust

Pivnik, S., Survivor: Auschwitz, the Death March and My Fight for Freedom (London: Hodder, 2013). Poterański, W., The Warsaw Ghetto: On the 30th Anniversary of the Armed Uprising of 1943 (Warsaw: Interpress, 1973).

Jewish Masculinity in the Holocaust

This book explores, for the first time, the impact of the Holocaust on the gender identities of Jewish men. Drawing on historical and sociological arguments, it specifically looks at the experiences of men in France, Holland, Belgium, and Poland. Jewish Masculinity in the Holocaust starts by examining the gendered environment and ideas of Jewish masculinity during the interwar period and in the run-up to the Holocaust. The volume then goes on to explore the effect of Nazi persecution on various elements of male gender identity, analysing a wide range of sources including diaries and journals written at the time, underground ghetto newspapers and numerous memoirs written in the intervening years by survivors. Taken together, these sources show that Jewish masculinities were severely damaged in the initial phases of persecution, particularly because men were unable to perform the gendered roles they expected of themselves. More controversially, however, Maddy Carey also shows that the escalation of the persecution and later enclosure – whether through ghettoisation or hiding – offered men the opportunity to reassert their masculine identities. Finally, the book discusses the impact of the Holocaust on the practice of fatherhood and considers its effect on the transmission of masculinity. This important study breaks new ground in its coverage of gender and masculinities and is an important text for anyone studying the history of the Holocaust.

Reckonings

See for example Sam Pivnik, Survivor: Auschwitz, the Death March and My Fight for Freedom (London: Hodder & Stoughton, 2012). It does not take away from the authenticity of the experience, suffering, and courage of the survivor to note ...

Reckonings

A single word - Auschwitz - is often used to encapsulate the totality of persecution and suffering involved in what we call the Holocaust. Yet a focus on a single concentration camp - however horrific what happened there, however massively catastrophic its scale - leaves an incomplete story, a truncated history. It cannot fully communicate the myriad ways in which individuals became tangled up on the side of the perpetrators, and obscures the diversity of experiences among a wide range of victims as they struggled and died, or managed, against all odds, to survive. In the process, we also miss the continuing legacy of Nazi persecution across generations, and across continents. Mary Fulbrook's encompassing book attempts to expand our understanding, exploring the lives of individuals across a full spectrum of suffering and guilt, each one capturing one small part of the greater story. At its heart, Reckonings seeks to expose the disjuncture between official myths about "dealing with the past," on the one hand, and the extent to which the vast majority of Nazi perpetrators evaded justice, on the other. In the successor states to the Third Reich-East Germany, West Germany, and Austria - the attempts at justice varied widely in the years and decades after 1945. The Communist East German state pursued Nazi criminals and handed down severe sentences; West Germany, seeking to draw a line under the past, tended toward leniency and tolerance. Austria made nearly no reckoning at all until the 1980s, when news broke about UN Secretary General Kurt Waldheim's past. Following the various periods of trials and testimonials after the war, the shifting attitudes toward both perpetrators and survivors, this major book weighs heavily down on the scales of justice. The Holocaust is not mere "history," and the memorial landscape covering it barely touches the surface; beneath it churns the maelstrom of reverberations of the Nazi era. Reckonings uses the stories of those who remained below the radar of public representations, outside the media spotlight, while also situating their experiences in the changing wider contexts and settings in which they sought to make sense of unprecedented suffering. Fulbrook uses the word "reckoning" in the widest possible sense, to evoke the consequences of violence on those directly involved, but also on those affected indirectly, and how its effects have expanded almost infinitely across place and time.

The Nazi Titanic

Pivnik's story: Sam Pivnik, Survivor: Auschwitz, the Death March and My Fight for Freedom. The Akos story is in the Francis Akos oral history. Rygiel's story and quotes: Brady, “Remembering a Wartime Tragedy.

The Nazi Titanic

Built in 1927, the German ocean liner SS Cap Arcona was the greatest ship since the RMS Titanic and one of the most celebrated luxury liners in the world. When the Nazis seized control in Germany, she was stripped down for use as a floating barracks and troop transport. Later, during the war, Hitler's minister, Joseph Goebbels, cast her as the "star" in his epic propaganda film about the sinking of the legendary Titanic. Following the film's enormous failure, the German navy used the Cap Arcona to transport German soldiers and civilians across the Baltic, away from the Red Army's advance. In the Third Reich's final days, the ill-fated ship was packed with thousands of concentration camp prisoners. Without adequate water, food, or sanitary facilities, the prisoners suffered as they waited for the end of the war. Just days before Germany surrendered, the Cap Arcona was mistakenly bombed by the British Royal Air Force, and nearly all of the prisoners were killed in the last major tragedy of the Holocaust and one of history's worst maritime disasters. Although the British government sealed many documents pertaining to the ship's sinking, Robert P. Watson has unearthed forgotten records, conducted many interviews, and used over 100 sources, including diaries and oral histories, to expose this story. As a result, The Nazi Titanic is a riveting and astonishing account of an enigmatic ship that played a devastating role in World War II and the Holocaust.

The Liberation of the Camps

Mirchuk, Petro, In the German Mills of Death 1941–1945, 2nd edn (New York: Vantage Press, 1985). ... Pivnik, Sam, Survivor: Auschwitz, the Death March and My Fight for Freedom (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 2012).

The Liberation of the Camps

A moving, deeply researched account of survivors' experiences of liberation from Nazi death camps and the long, difficult years that followed Seventy years have passed since the tortured inmates of Hitler's concentration and extermination camps were liberated. When the horror of the atrocities came fully to light, it was easy for others to imagine the joyful relief of freed prisoners. Yet for those who had survived the unimaginable, the experience of liberation was a slow, grueling journey back to life. In this unprecedented inquiry into the days, months, and years following the arrival of Allied forces at the Nazi camps, a foremost historian of the Holocaust draws on archival sources and especially on eyewitness testimonies to reveal the complex challenges liberated victims faced and the daunting tasks their liberators undertook to help them reclaim their shattered lives. Historian Dan Stone focuses on the survivors--their feelings of guilt, exhaustion, fear, shame for having survived, and devastating grief for lost family members; their immense medical problems; and their later demands to be released from Displaced Persons camps and resettled in countries of their own choosing. Stone also tracks the efforts of British, American, Canadian, and Russian liberators as they contended with survivors' immediate needs, then grappled with longer-term issues that shaped the postwar world and ushered in the first chill of the Cold War years ahead.

Der Wille zum Sinn

Der Wille zum Sinn


From Thessaloniki to Auschwitz and Back

It concludes with the author's return to Auschwitz many years later as a delegate to an international conference on the Holocaust. This book has been previously published in Greek, German, French and Serbian.

From Thessaloniki to Auschwitz and Back

Before WWII there was a thriving Jewish community of some 50,000 people in Thessaloniki, Greece. In 1943, under Nazi occupation, virtually the entire community was deported to Auschwitz extermination camp. That the author, Erika Amariglio, and several members of her family survived is due only to a series of coincidences, including the fact that they were on the first transport ot Auschwitz and that they spoke fluent German. Erika Amariglio's story covers the period before the war in Thessaloniki, the German occupation and the gradual tightening of restrictions, the transportation, the two-and-a-half years spent in Auschwitz, the long death march back to Germany, the Amariglio family's escape to Yugoslavia, and their eventual reunion of the family in Greece. It concludes with the author's return to Auschwitz many years later as a delegate to an international conference on the Holocaust. This book has been previously published in Greek, German, French and Serbian.

Kingdom of Night

Here in Kingdom of Night, Joseph Freeman tells the story of his wife Helen's survival in labor and concentration camps in Nazi-occupied Poland during WWII.

Kingdom of Night

Through his writing and his appearances nationwide, Joseph Freeman has shared his story of survival during the Holocaust. Here in Kingdom of Night, Joseph Freeman tells the story of his wife Helen's survival in labor and concentration camps in Nazi-occupied Poland during WWII. As Michael Berenbaum writes in the book's Foreword, "Surely we who read her story must be grateful for all that she shared and grateful again to her husband Joseph...who brings Chaiale's [Helen's] story to the printed page where it will long endure. By telling the "before" and "during," she has enriched the "after" and deepened the meaning of survival." Kingdom of Night is a touching memoir of innocence lost, the enduring power of faith, and a call to a new generation to bear witness to the atrocities of the past so that they may be empowered to respond to injustice.

New Perspectives on the Nigeria Biafra War

Although a piece of art, the Statue of Liberty is “more than a monument, she is a ... a living symbol of freedom to ... “Death March-Camp scene” vividly captures concentration camp prisoners being marched through a winter landscape.

New Perspectives on the Nigeria Biafra War

This book analyzes the impact of the Nigeria-Biafra war on the Igbo, the failure of the reconstruction and reconciliation effort in the post-war period, and the politics of exclusion of the memory of the war in public discourse in Nigeria, arguing that the war had lasting consequences for the socio-political developments in the post-war period.

My Hometown Concentration Camp

My Hometown Concentration Camp tells the story of the young Bernard Offen's endurance and survival of the KrakÃ?Â?Ã?Â?Ã?Â?Ã?Â3w Ghetto and five concentration camps, including PlaszÃ?Â?Ã?Â?Ã?Â?Ã?Â3w and Auschwitz-Birkenau, ...

My Hometown Concentration Camp

My Hometown Concentration Camp tells the story of the young Bernard Offen's endurance and survival of the KrakÃ?Â?Ã?Â?Ã?Â?Ã?Â3w Ghetto and five concentration camps, including PlaszÃ?Â?Ã?Â?Ã?Â?Ã?Â3w and Auschwitz-Birkenau, until his liberation near Dachau by American troops in 1945. The author tells of his experiences in the ghetto and camps and how he set out, after the war, in search of his brothers, eventually finding them in Italy with the Polish Army. Having returned to the United States, Bernard Offen was drafted into the US Army to serve in the Korean War. After the war, he founded his own business and built a family, both helping to restore a sense of normality to his life. This was the start of his own unique process of healing that led, ultimately, to his retirement and decision to dedicate his life to educating audiences around the world about his experiences during the Holocaust. Bernard Offen's story recounts his one-man journey across America, Europe, Israel, and back to his native Poland, and his development as a filmmaker, educator, and healer. My Hometown Concentration Camp will touch readers through the strength of the author's self-determination to attempt to confront and conquer the traumatic experiences he witnessed as a young man.

The Jewish Women of Ravensbr ck Concentration Camp

Here is the story of real daily camp life with the women’s thoughts about food, friendships, fear of rape and sexual abuse, hygiene issues, punishment, work, and resistance.

The Jewish Women of Ravensbr  ck Concentration Camp

Ravensbrück was the only major Nazi concentration camp for women. Located about fifty miles north of Berlin, the camp was the site of murder by slave labor, torture, starvation, shooting, lethal injection, "medical" experimentation, and gassing. While this camp was designed to hold 5,000 women, the actual figure was six times this number. Between 1939 and 1945, 132,000 women from twenty-three countries were imprisoned in Ravensbrück, including political prisoners, Jehovah's Witnesses, "asocials" (including Gypsies, prostitutes, and lesbians), criminals, and Jewish women (who made up about 20 percent of the population). Only 15,000 survived. Drawing upon more than sixty narratives and interviews of survivors in the United States, Israel, and Europe as well as unpublished testimonies, documents, and photographs from private archives, Rochelle Saidel provides a vivid collective and individual portrait of Ravensbrück’s Jewish women prisoners. She worked for over twenty years to track down these women whose poignant testimonies deserve to be shared with a wider audience and future generations. Their memoirs provide new perspectives and information about satellite camps (there were about 70 slave labor sub-camps). Here is the story of real daily camp life with the women’s thoughts about food, friendships, fear of rape and sexual abuse, hygiene issues, punishment, work, and resistance. Saidel includes accounts of the women's treatment, their daily struggles to survive, their hopes and fears, their friendships, their survival strategies, and the aftermath. On April 30, 1945, the Soviet Army liberated Ravensbrück. They found only 3,000 extremely ill women in the camp, because the Nazis had sent other remaining women on a death march. The Jewish Women of Ravensbrück Concentration Camp reclaims the lost voices of the victims and restores the personal accounts of the survivors.

Winter Time

This rare account from a survivor of Gypsy concentration camps during World War II relates how German Sinto Walter Winter was discharged from the German navy in 1943 on racial grounds and was deported to Auschwitz with his brother and ...

Winter Time

This rare account from a survivor of Gypsy concentration camps during World War II relates how German Sinto Walter Winter was discharged from the German navy in 1943 on racial grounds and was deported to Auschwitz with his brother and sister. The atrocities he witnessed, including the death of his wife and unborn child, are told in stark, unflinching detail. As well as reporting horrific persecutions, Winter recalls moments of personal bravery in which he beat up an SS guard and confronted the notorious Dr. Mengele to request extra rations for starving Sinti children on his block. As the Gypsy culture is generally predisposed not to dwell on the past, this memoir tells a rare story infused with a quiet hopefulness that suggests Winter retained his spirit, courage, and sense of fairness in the face of unspeakable cruelty.

Sentenced to Live

Chs. 1-10 (p. 7-111) relate the author's early childhood in Jasina, Czechoslovakia (which became part of Hungary in March 1939), her family's increasingly difficult situation after the Nazi occupation of Hungary in March 1944, and their ...

Sentenced to Live

Chs. 1-10 (p. 7-111) relate the author's early childhood in Jasina, Czechoslovakia (which became part of Hungary in March 1939), her family's increasingly difficult situation after the Nazi occupation of Hungary in March 1944, and their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz. Describes the struggle for survival - along with her sister - in Auschwitz, their transfer as slave laborers to Nuremberg, and their liberation in May 1945. The rest of the author's family perished in the Holocaust.

Escaping Auschwitz

His words never reached the half million Hungarian Jews who were herded there. The story of that suppression is told here.

Escaping Auschwitz

In 1944 a Slovakian Jew named Rudolf Vrba escaped from Auschwitz and wrote a document about the death camp activities. His words never reached the half million Hungarian Jews who were herded there. The story of that suppression is told here.

At the Mind s Limits

Jean Amery (1921-1978) was born in Vienna and in 1938 emigrated to Belgium, where he joined the Resistance.

At the Mind s Limits

Jean Amery (1921-1978) was born in Vienna and in 1938 emigrated to Belgium, where he joined the Resistance. He was caught by the Germans in 1943, tortured by the SS, and survived the next two years in the concentration camps. In five autobiographical essays, Amery describes his survival--mental, moral, and physical--through the enormity and horror of the Holocaust.

Seed of Sarah

The author recounts her childhood in Hungary, her experiences as a prisoner in a Nazi concentration camp, and how she and others survived their ordeal

Seed of Sarah

The author recounts her childhood in Hungary, her experiences as a prisoner in a Nazi concentration camp, and how she and others survived their ordeal

Congressional Record

Congressional Record

The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. It is published daily when Congress is in session. The Congressional Record began publication in 1873. Debates for sessions prior to 1873 are recorded in The Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States (1789-1824), the Register of Debates in Congress (1824-1837), and the Congressional Globe (1833-1873)

The Survivor in Us All

Recounts "Ruth's" experiences as a Polish Jew who, with her three sisters, survived the concentration camps where her father, mother, and young brother perished.

The Survivor in Us All

Recounts "Ruth's" experiences as a Polish Jew who, with her three sisters, survived the concentration camps where her father, mother, and young brother perished.