Sydney Bridge Upside Down Text Classics

A great, untamed story about childhood, a summer holiday and a sinister tragedy that looms over everything.

Sydney Bridge Upside Down  Text Classics

A great, untamed story about childhood, a summer holiday and a sinister tragedy that looms over everything.

1788 Text Classics

Text. Classics. For reading group notes visittextclassics.com.au The Commandant Jessica Anderson Introduced by Carmen Callil Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down David Ballantyne Introduced by ...

1788  Text Classics

In 1788 Watkin Tench stepped ashore at Botany Bay with the First Fleet. This curious young captain of the marines was an effortless storyteller. His account of the infant colony is the first classic of Australian literature.

Stiff Text Classics

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Stiff  Text Classics

The fiddle at the Pacific Pastoral meat-packing works was a nice little earner for all concerned until Herb Gardiner reported finding a body in number 3 chiller. An accident, of course, but just the excuse a devious political operator might grab to stir up trouble with the unions. Enter Murray Whelan, minder and fixer for the Minister of Industry.

The Plains Text Classics

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The Plains  Text Classics

Winner of the Patrick White Literary Award, 1999. Introduction by Wayne Macauley. There is no book in Australian literature like The Plains. In the two decades since its first publication, this haunting novel has earned its status as a classic. A nameless young man arrives on the plains and begins to document the strange and rich culture of the plains families. As his story unfolds, the novel becomes, in the words of Murray Bail, ‘a mirage of landscape, memory, love and literature itself’. Gerald Murnane was born in Melbourne in 1939. He has been a primary teacher, an editor and a university lecturer. His debut novel, Tamarisk Row (1974), was followed by ten other works of fiction, including The Plains and most recently Border Districts. In 1999 Murnane won the Patrick White Award and in 2009 he won the Melbourne Prize for Literature. He lives in western Victoria. Wayne Macauley is the author of three novels, Blueprints for a Barbed-Wire Canoe (2004), Caravan Story (2007) and The Cook (2011), and the short fiction collection Other Stories (2010). He lives in Melbourne. ‘Murnane is quite simply one of the finest writers we have produced.’ Peter Craven ‘A distinguished, distinctive, unforgettable novel.’ Shirley Hazzard ‘Gerald Murnane is unquestionably one of the most original writers working in Australia today and The Plains is a fascinating and rewarding book...The writing is extraordinarily good, spare, austere, strong, often oddly moving.’ Australian ‘A piece of imaginative writing so remarkably sustained that it is a subject for meditation rather than a mere reading...In the depths and surfaces of this extraordinary fable you will see your inner self eerily reflected again and again.’ Sydney Morning Herald ‘The Plains has that peculiar singularity that can make literature great.’ Ed Wright, Australian, Best Books of 2015 ‘Murnane touches on foibles and philosophy, plays with the makings of a fable or allegory, and all the while toys with tone, moving easily from earnest to deadpan to lightly ironic, a meld of Buster Keaton, the Kafka of the short stories, and Swift in A Modest Proposal...A provocative, delightful, diverting must-reread.’ STARRED Review, Kirkus Reviews ‘Known for its sharp yet defamiliarizing take on the landscape and an aesthetic of purity historically associated with it, The Plains is uniformly described as a masterpiece of Australian literature. Look closer, though, and it's a haunting nineteenth-century novel of colonial violence captured inside the machine's test-pattern image—a distant, unassuming house on the plains.’ BOMB

Dark Places Text Classics

For reading group notes visit textclassics.com.au. 1Iw¢t0£a/sscc/s. The Commandant Jessica Anderson Introduced by Carmen Callil Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down David Ballantyne Introduced by ...

Dark Places  Text Classics

Dark Places, a companion novel to Lilian’s Story, is the tale of a man with a comically grand exterior who believes he has the right, and the duty, to conquer the mocking flesh of any woman. Even his own daughter.

The Watch Tower Text Classics

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The Watch Tower  Text Classics

‘Harrower's greatest novel [is] The Watch Tower (1966), the bitter story of two sisters, Laura and Clare, who lose their parents and fall under the sway of Felix Shaw, an abusive and controlling drunk...[It is] her masterpiece.’ James Wood, New Yorker After Laura and Clare are abandoned by their mother, Felix is there to help, even to marry Laura if she will have him. Little by little the two sisters grow complicit with his obsessions, his cruelty, his need to control. Set in the leafy northern suburbs of Sydney during the 1940s, The Watch Tower is a novel of relentless and acute psychological power. Elizabeth Harrower was born in Sydney in 1928. Her first novel Down in the City was published in 1957, and was followed by The Long Prospect a year later. In 1959 she began working for the ABC and as a book reviewer for the Sydney Morning Herald. In 1960 she published The Catherine Wheel, the story of an Australian law student in London, her only novel not set in Sydney. The Watch Tower appeared in 1966. She was admired by many of her contemporaries, including Patrick White and Christina Stead, and is without doubt among the most important writers of the postwar period in Australia. Elizabeth Harrower lives in Sydney. 'Haunting and delicate.' Kirkus Reviews 'This is a harrowing novel, relentless in its depiction of marital enslavement, spiritual self-destruction and the exploited condition of women in a masculinist society...It is a brilliant achievement.' Washington Post 'Haunting...Harrower captures brilliantly the struggle to retain a self.' Guardian ‘Each of Harrower’s four novels is concerned with entrapment of one sort or another, through family or youth or love. But The Watch Tower, her last novel, is almost like a distillation in its vision of the forces of good and evil. Something runs clear and strong through this wonderful, painful novel, the dark and the light. The victim and the survivor. Suffering and joy. The knowledge of both. Reality.’ Joan London, Lit Hub 'Elizabeth Harrower's thrilling 1966 novel The Watch Tower comes rampaging back from decades of disgraceful neglect: a wartime Sydney story of two abandoned sisters and the arrival in their lives of Felix, one of literature's most ferociously realised nasty pieces of work.' Helen Garner, Australian 'A superb psychological novel that will creep into your bones.' Michelle de Kretser, The Monthly 'I read The Watch Tower with a mixture of fascination and horror. It was impossible to put down...Her acute psychological assessments are made from gestures, language and glances and she is brilliant on power, isolation and class.' Ramona Koval, Australian ‘To create a monster as continually credible, comic and nauseating as Felix is a feat of a very high order. But to control that creation, as Miss Harrower does, so that Clare remains the centre of interest is an achievement even more rare. The Watch Tower is a triumph of art over virtuosity...a dense, profoundly moral novel of our time.’ H.G. Kippax, Sydney Morning Herald, 19 November 1966 ‘As gripping and terrifying as any horror story...An astonishing book.’ Guardian ‘Harrower’s stark examination of two young women’s vulnerability and helplessness in the face of a domineering man’s savagery is painful to read. I have read it twice now and each time I have been moved by the clarity of Harrower’s vision, the terrible plausibility of her characters and the sheer power of the restrained emotion in her writing. It is a novel that deserves the closest and most attentive reading.’ Transnational Literature

An Iron Rose Text Classics

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An Iron Rose  Text Classics

The classic thriller by the five-time winner of the Ned Kelly Award. Introduction by Les Carlyon. When Mac Faraday's best friend is found hanging, the assumption is suicide. But Mac is far from convinced, and he's a man who knows not to accept things at face value. A regular at the local pub, a mainstay of the footy team, Mac is living the quiet life of a country blacksmith - a life connected to a place, connected to its people. But Mac carries a burden of fear and vigilance from his old life. And as this past of secrets, corruption, abuse and murder begins to close in, he must turn to long-forgotten resources to hang on to everything he holds dear, including his own life. Peter Temple is one of Australia's finest writers, the winner of Australia's premier prize for literature in 2010, the Miles Franklin Award, and the Victorian Premier's Literary Award for his novel Truth. Born in South Africa, Peter Temple settled in Australia in 1980 and worked as a journalist and teacher before becoming a full-time novelist. Temple has written nine novels and has won the Ned Kelly Award for crime fiction five times. Les Carlyon is the author of Gallipoli, a bestseller in Australia, Britain and New Zealand, The Great War, which was voted book of the year at the Australian Book Industry Awards, and The Master: A Personal Portrait of Bart Cummings. 'Peter Temple has a way with words and the richness of his language alone makes this book rewarding...This is a great book.' Sacramento/San Francisco Book Review 'Temple invests his characters' thought, speech, and deeds with an arresting immediacy and freshness.' Booklist 'A wonderfully controlled piece of writing with some delightfully wry observations...the quality of the prose alone makes the book worth reading.' Opinionator 'A must for thriller seekers.' Who Weekly 'Fast, funny and assured.' Australian Book Review 'The coolest and most elegant of Australian crime writers.' Age 'Temple is a phenomenon.' Sydney Morning Herald 'An Iron Rose has Temple's usual grizzled police veteran as the central character, a despicable and mystifying crime and a support crew of goodies and baddies...Temple's dry Australian vernacular and wit should be required reading for everyone above the age of 16. This edition is introduced by Les Carlyon, a better match for Temple's writing I could not imagine.' Melbourne Weekly

Wake In Fright Text Classics

For reading group notes visit textclassics.com.au. Ylwet. Ola/sodas. The Commandant Jessica Anderson Introduced by Carmen Callil Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down David Ballantyne Introduced ...

Wake In Fright  Text Classics

Wake in Fright tells the tale of John Grant's journey into an alcoholic, sexual and spiritual nightmare. It is the original and the greatest outback horror story. Bundanyabba and its citizens will forever haunt its readers. This edition includes an introduction by Peter Temple and an afterword by David Stratton. Wake in Fright was made into a film in 1971, arguably the greatest film ever made in Australia. It starred Donald Pleasence, Chips Rafferty, and Jack Thompson in his first screen role. Lost for many years, the restored film was re-released to acclaim in 2009. Kenneth Cook was born in Sydney in 1929. Wake in Fright was published in 1961 to high praise in New York and London, and launched Cook's writing career. Cook wrote twenty-one books in all, along with screenplays and scripts for radio and TV. Peter Temple is one of Australia's finest writers. His novel Truth won the 2010 Miles Franklin Award and the Victorian Premier's Literary Award. Temple has written nine novels and has been published in more than twenty countries. David Stratton is co-presenter of At the Movies on ABC television and film critic for the Australian. He has also served as a President of the International Critics Jury for the Cannes and Venice Film Festivals, written three books and is currently lecturing in Film History at the University of Sydney. textclassics.com.au 'It might be fifty years since the novel appeared yet it retains its freshness, its narrative still compels, and its bleak vision still disquiets...Cook can make us feel the heat, see the endless horizon, hear the sad singing on a little train as it traverses the monotonous plain.' Peter Temple, from the Introduction 'Wake in Fright deserves its status as a modern classic. Cook's prose is masterful and the story is gripping from the first page to the last.' M. J. Hyland 'A classic novel which became a classic film. The Outback without the sentimental bulldust. Australia without the sugar coating.' Robert Drewe 'Wake in Fright is a classic of the ugly side of Menzies' Australia, its brutality, its drunkenness, its anxiety to crush all sensibility. All of this is harrowingly reacorded - the destruction of a young soul fresh to Australia - in Kenneth Cook's remarkable novel.' Thomas Keneally 'A true dark classic of Australian literature.' J. M. Coetzee '...a kind of outback Lord of the Flies...Written entirely from Grant's point of view, the prose is at first straightforward, the landscape and its people evoked simply and vividly. But later, as Grant descends into his own personal hell and finally to the depths of despair, the writing takes on the quality of a delirious dream. The concluding narrative twists will rock both Grant (and the reader) back on their heels.' Crime Time UK ‘A chilling outback horror and an Australian classic.’ Guardian, Top 10 tales from the frontier

The Long Prospect Text Classics

The Commandant Jessica Anderson Introduced by Carmen Callil Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down David Ballantyne Introduced by Kate De Goldi Bush Studies Barbara Baynton Introduced by Helen ...

The Long Prospect  Text Classics

Sharply observed, bitter and humorous, The Long Prospect is a story of life in an Australian industrial town. Growing up neglected in a seedy boarding house, Emily Lawrence befriends Max, a middle-aged scientist who encourages her to pursue her intellectual interests. Innocent Emily will face scandal, suburban snobbery and psychological torment.

The Women in Black Text Classics

For reading group notes visit textclassics.com.au. Ylwct. Ola/sows. The Commandant Jessica Anderson Introduced by Carmen Callil Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down David Ballantyne Introduced by ...

The Women in Black  Text Classics

Written by a superb novelist of contemporary manners, The Women in Black is a fairytale which illuminates the extraordinariness of ordinary lives. The women in black are run off their feet, what with the Christmas rush and the summer sales that follow. But it's Sydney in the 1950s, and there's still just enough time left on a hot and frantic day to dream and scheme...By the time the last marked-down frock has been sold, most of the staff of the Ladies' Cocktail section at F. G. Goode's have been launched into slightly different careers. With the lightest touch and the most tender of comic instincts, Madeleine St John conjures a vanished summer of innocence. The Women in Black, introduced by Bruce Beresford, is a great novel, a lost Australian classic. Madeleine St John was born in Sydney in 1941. She studied Arts at Sydney University, where her contemporaries included Bruce Beresford, Germaine Greer, Clive James and Robert Hughes. In 1993, St John published her first novel, The Women in Black, the only book she set in Australia. Her third novel, The Essence of the Thing (1997), was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Bruce Beresford is one of Australia's best known film and opera directors. His films include The Getting of Wisdom, Driving Miss Daisy and Breaker Morant. textclassics.com.au 'Seductive, hilarious, brilliantly observed, this novel shimmers with wit and tenderness.' Helen Garner 'An exceptional writer. Those of us who knew her at Sydney University back in the late 1950s are still trying to forgive ourselves that we never guessed what she would become.' Clive James 'A knockout - ironic, sharp, alive, and then you're stopped in your tracks by the warmth of her insights.' Joan London 'A little gem...shot through with old-fashioned innocence and sly humour.' Vogue 'A highly sophisticated work, full of funny, sharp and subtle observations...a small masterpiece.' Sunday Times(UK) 'There is something special about...The Women in Black. St John's tone is...a joy: brisk, perfectly managed and, in its disdain for clutter, oddly life-affirming. She casts an airy spell with the deftness of her prose, which moves gracefully, swiftly and with perfect manners...[St John] conjures a Sydney on the cusp of modern promise; a place where her characters can meet the future with a bright face and step out of the past like an old dress, where limits can be lightly shaken off.' Delia Falconer, Australian ‘An excellent read.’ Starts at 60

A Difficult Young Man Text Classics

For reading group notes visit textclassics.com.au. Ylwct. 0£a/save/s. The Commandant Jessica Anderson Introduced by Carmen Callil Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down David Ballantyne Introduced ...

A Difficult Young Man  Text Classics

Handsome, proud, reprehensible, misunderstood. Dominic Langton is the dark heart of A Difficult Young Man. His brother Guy can scarcely understand where he fits into the pattern of things or what he might do next. Martin Boyd’s much loved novel is an elegant, witty and compelling family tale about the contradictions of growing up.

They re A Weird Mob Text Classics

For reading group notes visit textclassics.com.au. Ylwct. Ola/mic/s. The Commandant Jessica Anderson Introduced by Carmen Callil Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down David Ballantyne Introduced ...

They re A Weird Mob  Text Classics

Just off the boat from Italy, Nino Culotta arrives in Sydney. He thought he spoke English but he’s never heard anything like the language these Australians are speaking. They’re a Weird Mob is an hilarious snapshot of the immigrant experience in Menzies-era Australia, by a writer with a brilliant ear for the Australian way with words.

Swords and Crowns and Rings Text Classics

The Commandant Jessica Anderson Introduced by Carmen Callil Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down David Ballantyne Introduced by Kate De Goldi Bush Studies Barbara Baynton Introduced by Helen ...

Swords and Crowns and Rings  Text Classics

Ruth Park’s Miles Franklin-winning novel brilliantly evokes Australia in the midst of the Great Depression. Written with warmth and affection, Swords and Crowns and Rings is a powerful story about human nature and the strength of an unlikely love.

The Even More Complete Book Of Australian Verse Text Classics

For reading group notes visit textclassics.com.au. Ylwct. Ola/ssic/s. The Commandant Jessica Anderson Introduced by Carmen Callil Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down David Ballantyne Introduced ...

The Even More Complete Book Of Australian Verse  Text Classics

Possibly the most important anthology ever published. The definitive collection featuring key works by such famous Australian poets as Gavin Milton, Arnold Wordsworth, Sylvia Blath, Very Manly Hopkins, R.A.C.V. Milne and Dylan Thompson.

Whispering in the Wind

Text Classics Alan Marshall. Introduced by Emily Maguire Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down David Ballantyne Introduced by Kate De Goldi Bush Studies Barbara Baynton Introduced by Helen Garner ...

Whispering in the Wind

Peter sets out into the Australian bush on his pony that leaps like lightning to find a princess to rescue from a dragon—something only a brave and good person can attempt. Along the way he meets a trusty companion, a kangaroo with a bottomless pouch, and together they follow the directions of the helpful Willy Willy Man across the landscape. With a trip to the moon with the Pale Witch to sweep it clear of Russian and American cameras, a journey across the Plain of Clutching Grass, a visit to a giant’s castle and a battle with the Doubt Cats, Peter’s bravery and kindness are put to the test. This humorous and enchanting Australian fairy tale will enthrall readers of all ages. Alan Marshall, born in 1902, was an Australian writer, story teller, humanist and social documenter. Marshall received the Australian Literature Society Short Story Award three times. He died in 1984.

Down in the City

Text Classics Elizabeth Harrower ... Adams Introduced by Susan Wyndham The Commandant Jessica Anderson Introduced by Carmen Callil Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down David Ballantyne Introduced ...

Down in the City

Esther Prescott has seen little of life outside her wealthy family's Rose Bay mansion, until flashy Stan Peterson comes roaring up the drive in his huge American car and barges into her life. Within a fortnight they are living in his Kings Cross flat. Moody and erratic, proud of his well-bred wife yet bitterly resentful of her privilege, Stan is involved with his former girlfriend and a series of shady business deals. Esther, innocent and desperate to please him, must endure his controlling ways. This story of a troubled and obsessive marriage, set against the backdrop of postwar Sydney, is devastating. First published in 1957, Down in the City announced Elizabeth Harrower as a major Australian writer. Elizabeth Harrower was born in Sydney in 1928. Her first novel Down in the City was published in 1957, and was followed by The Long Prospect a year later. In 1959 she began working for the ABC and as a book reviewer for the Sydney Morning Herald. In 1960 she published The Catherine Wheel, the story of an Australian law student in London, her only novel not set in Sydney. The Watch Tower appeared in 1966. Her work is austere, intelligent, ruthless in its perceptions about men and women. She was admired by many of her contemporaries, including Patrick White and Christina Stead, and is without doubt among the most important writers of the postwar period in Australia. Elizabeth Harrower lives in Sydney. textpublishing.com.au 'Down in the City marked the arrival of one of the sharpest authors of psychological fiction in Australian literature. Many of the things that happen in the novel are unpleasant, but are rendered with such intensity and psychological insight that the experience of reading about them is thrilling.' Australian 'a triumph from Text's project to recover forgotten Australian literature. Doused in melancholy and written from an accessible yet unnerving third-person perspective, Harrower's debut is a light read with weighty resonance.' Readings Bookshop

Blue Skies

Text Classics Helen Hodgman ... by Carmen Callil Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down David Ballantyne Introduced by Kate De Goldi Bush Studies Barbara Baynton Introduced by Helen Garner ...

Blue Skies

In Helen Hodgman’s dazzlingly written debut a young woman is trapped in a small city on an island at the end of the world—by motherhood and an absent husband, by busybody in-laws and neighbours, by a drab society yet to throw off the shackles of its colonial past. A darkly funny tale of a crack-up in stultifying suburbia, Blue Skies marked the emergence of a unique, acerbic voice in Australian fiction. This edition includes an introduction by the acclaimed Tasmanian author Danielle Wood. The clock always said three in the afternoon, no matter what you did to it...No matter what you tried, the day ran out then, and there was nothing left to fill it with. Helen Hodgman is the author of the novels Blue Skies (1976), Jack and Jill (1978; winner of the Somerset Maugham Award), Broken Words (1988; winner of the Christina Stead Prize), Passing Remarks (1996), Waiting for Matindi (1998) and The Bad Policeman (2001). ‘Singularly searing and merciless prose.’ Sunday Age ‘As fresh, punchy and relevant now as it was on its [first] release...A compelling vision.’ Australian ‘Scarily unforgettable.’ Peter Conrad ‘Strange and memorable.’ Eva Hornung ‘The very essence of Tasmanian gothic.’ Carmel Bird ‘Sensuous...Prickly as a sea urchin.’ Nicholas Shakespeare ‘A convincing study of a woman slowly losing her mind.’ Sunday Herald ‘Elegantly written, atmospheric.’ Brenda Niall, Australian Book Review ‘Has a masterpiece’s power to thrill and discomfort.’ Sunday Tasmanian ‘Stylistically assured...Daring and persuasive in its depiction of a controlled and vengeful anguish.’ Peter Pierce, Sydney Morning Herald

Careful He Might Hear You

Text Classics Sumner Locke Elliott. For reading group notes visit textclassics.com.au ... Anderson Introduced by Carmen Callil Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down David Ballantyne Introduced by ...

Careful  He Might Hear You

It’s the Great Depression. Six-year-old PS is an orphan. He lives in Sydney with his Aunt Lila. But all that is about to change. Now his Aunt Vanessa has decided to take proper care of him. Careful, He Might Hear You is one of the most extraordinary portraits of childhood in Australian fiction.

The Middle Parts Of Fortune

Text Classics Frederic Manning. For reading group notes visit textclassics.com.au ... Jessica Anderson Introduced by Carmen Callil Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down David Ballantyne Introduced ...

The Middle Parts Of Fortune

Hailed by Eliot, Pound, Lawrence and Hemingway, and based on the author’s own experiences, The Middle Parts of Fortune is a breathtaking account of the Great War and the men who fought it.

Honour Other People s Children

Text Classics Helen Garner ... Rainshadow Thea Astley Introduced by Chloe Hooper Drylands Thea Astley Introduced by Emily Maguire Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down David Ballantyne Introduced ...

Honour   Other People   s Children

Two novellas about the deep connections we forge with the people we love, and the pain of breaking those connections. In Honour, Kathleen and Frank are amicably separated, in contact through shared parenting of their young daughter, Flo. But when Frank finds a new partner and wants a divorce, Kathleen is hurt. And Flo can’t understand why they all can’t live together. In Other People’s Children, Ruth and Scotty live in a big share house that’s breaking up. Scotty is trying to hold on, remembering the early days of telling life stories and laughter and singing—and when the kids were everyone’s kids. But now the bitterness has crept in and their friendship is broken. Ruth is ready to move on—and she’ll take her kids with her. Helen Garner writes novels, stories, screenplays and works of non-fiction. In 2006 she received the inaugural Melbourne Prize for Literature, and in 2016 she won the prestigious Windham-Campbell Prize for non-fiction and the Western Australian Premier’s Book Award. Her book of essays Everywhere I Look won the 2017 Indie Book Award for Non-Fiction. ‘Garner is scrupulous, painstaking, and detailed, with sharp eyes and ears. She is everywhere at once, watching and listening, a recording angel at life’s secular apocalypses...her unillusioned eye makes her clarity compulsive.’ James Wood, New Yorker ‘She drills into experience and comes up with such clean, precise distillations of life, once you read them they enter into you. Successive generations of writers have felt the keen influence of her work and for this reason Garner has become part of us all.’ Weekend Australian ‘Helen Garner’s collections of fiction and non-fiction corroborate her reputation as a great stylist and a great witness.’ Peter Craven, Australian