Sydney Bridge Upside Down Text Classics

A great, untamed story about childhood, a summer holiday and a sinister tragedy that looms over everything.

Sydney Bridge Upside Down  Text Classics

A great, untamed story about childhood, a summer holiday and a sinister tragedy that looms over everything.

Sydney Bridge Upside Down

Harry Baird lives with his mother, father and younger brother Cal in Calliope Bay, at the edge of the world.

Sydney Bridge Upside Down


Mapping the Godzone

The gothic theme is usually linked explicitly with a story of adolescence , with the idea of growing up into an unknown and fearful adult universe , as in David Ballantyne's Sydney Bridge Upside Down ( 1968 ) .

Mapping the Godzone

An American describes New Zealand literature, culture, and film, and compares and contrasts them with those of the United States

The Auckland University Press Anthology of New Zealand Literature

(1972) The Problem of Engineless Flight David Ballantyne, from Sydney Bridge Upside Down The noise of the hooves is so loud that I am running frightened even before I see Sydney Bridge Upside Down galloping through the dusk towards me.

The Auckland University Press Anthology of New Zealand Literature

What, after all, is the truth of a place that has only just been worked into language?' From Polynesian Mythology to the Yates' Garden Guide, from Allen Curnow to Alice Tawhai, from Jessie Mackay to Alison Wong, from Julius Vogel to Albert Wendt, from the letters of Wiremu Te Rangikaheke to the notebooks of Katherine Mansfield - Maori, Pakeha, Pasifika, and Asian New Zealanders have struggled for two and a half centuries to work the English language into some sort of truth about this place. The Auckland University Press Anthology of New Zealand Literature brings together for the first time in one volume this country's major writing, from the earliest records of exploration and encounter to the globalised, multicultural present. Editors Jane Stafford and Mark Williams range across novels and stories, poems and plays, letters and diaries, comics and songs to collect the defining stuff of our literary heritage. The contents will delight and provoke: Erewhon and The Heart of the Bush; Man Alone and 'No Ordinary Sun'; The God Boy and Hicksville; 'The Gumboot Song' and The Vintner's Luck. Through an imaginative selection and illuminating introductions, Stafford and Williams provide new paths into our writing and our country. For students and readers, at home and overseas, the Anthology of New Zealand Literature will be the indispensable introduction for years to come to what's worth reading and why.

In the Glass Case

By comparison, Ballantyne's opening to Sydney Bridge Upside Down is impeccable— the prose economically tailored to the limits of the statement made. (That there will be 'terrible happenings' is simply announced.) ...

In the Glass Case

Over a quarter of a century, C. K. Stead has built up a widely accessible collection of reviews and critical essays on New Zealand literature. In the Glass Case covers a wide spectrum of New Zealand writers, who are examined from a remarkably consistent viewpoint. The title is symbolic: New Zealand books were once held in a glass-fronted bookcase at the University of Auckland library. These were considered rare, although they are now out on the open shelves. Stead's views are often controversial and provoke discussion and passionate debate from other critics. This is not only an enlightening look into New Zealand literature and C. K. Stead, it is also a very enjoyable read.

Kin of Place

By comparison, Ballantyne's opening to Sydney Bridge Upside Down is impeccable – the prose economically tailored to the limits of the statement made. (That there will be 'terrible happenings' is simply announced.) ...

Kin of Place

In Kin of Place, C. K. Stead addresses most of the leading New Zealand literary figures of the last decades of the twentieth century including Allen Curnow, Lauris Edmond, Kendrick Smithyman, Frank Sargeson, Janet Frame, Ian Wedde, Maurice Gee and Elizabeth Knox. Kin of Place represents a collection of perceptive, readable, opinionated comment on a wide range of local writers and writing over a long period and shows in an interesting way the evolution of Stead's critical position.

Where the Nightmares End and Real Life Begins

The unreliable narrator is one of the most contested concepts in narrative theory.

 Where the Nightmares End and Real Life Begins

The unreliable narrator is one of the most contested concepts in narrative theory. While critical debates have been heated, they have tended to foreground that the problem of the unreliable narrator is epistemological rather than ontological: it is agreed that narrators can be unreliable in their accounts, but not how the unreliable narrator ought to be defined, nor even how readers can be expected in all certainty to find a narration unreliable. As the wider critical discourse has looked to tighten its collective understanding of what constitutes unreliability and how readers understand and negotiate unreliable narration, previously divided views have begun to be reconciled on the understanding that, rather than deferring to either an implied author or reader, textual signals themselves might be better understood as the most fundamental markers of unreliability. Consequently, taxonomies of unreliable narration based on exacting textual evidence have been developed and are now widely held as indispensable. This thesis argues that while such taxonomies do indeed bring greater interpretive clarity to instances of unreliable narration, they also risk the assumption that with the right critical apparatus in place, even the most challenging unreliable narrators can, in the end, be reliably read. Countering the assumption are rare but telling examples of narrators whose reliability the reader might have reason to suspect, but whose unreliability cannot be reliably or precisely ascertained. With recourse to David Ballantyne's Sydney Bridge Upside Down, this thesis proposes new terminological distinctions to account for instances of such radical unreliability: namely the 'unsecured narrator', whose account is therefore an 'insecure narration'. Ballantyne's novel, published in 1968, has not received sustained critical attention to date, though it has been acclaimed by a small number of influential critics and writers in Ballantyne's native New Zealand.

Teaching Australian and New Zealand Literature

Evans's former student, Kate De Goldi, tells the anecdote in her introduction to David Ballantyne's gothic novel Sydney Bridge Upside Down (vii). 3. These are ideas that much subsequent Kiwi gothic will return to. For example, in Sydney ...

Teaching Australian and New Zealand Literature

Australia and New Zealand, united geographically by their location in the South Pacific and linguistically by their English-speaking inhabitants, share the strong bond of hope for cultural diversity and social equality--one often challenged by history, starting with the appropriation of land from their Indigenous peoples. This volume explores significant themes and topics in Australian and New Zealand literature. In their introduction, the editors address both the commonalities and differences between the two nations' literatures by considering literary and historical contexts and by making nuanced connections between the global and the local. Contributors share their experiences teaching literature on the iconic landscape and ecological fragility; stories and perspectives of convicts, migrants, and refugees; and Maori and Aboriginal texts, which add much to the transnational turn. This volume presents a wide array of writers--such as Patrick White, Janet Frame, Katherine Mansfield, Frank Sargeson, Witi Ihimaera, Christina Stead, Allen Curnow, David Malouf, Les Murray, Nam Le, Miles Franklin, Kim Scott, and Sally Morgan--and offers pedagogical tools for teachers to consider issues that include colonial and racial violence, performance traditions, and the role of language and translation. Concluding with a list of resources, this volume serves to support new and experienced instructors alike.

After the Fireworks

"David Ballantyne's life as a New Zealnd writer brought him little more than disappointment, despair, and an urge to self-destruction by alcohol.

After the Fireworks

As one of the most important novelists to come out of New Zealand, David Ballantyne was one of the first writers to push the novel into the modern era in his homeland. This biography examines Ballantyne's work as well as the highs and lows of his life as a writer and journalist.

A History of New Zealand Literature

... (1963) and David Ballantyne's Sydney Bridge Upside Down (1968) are often regarded together; both are provincial Gothics narrated by nearadolescent boys, and both gained substantial attention locally long after their publication.

A History of New Zealand Literature

A History of New Zealand Literature traces the genealogy of New Zealand literature from its first imaginings by Europeans in the eighteenth century. Beginning with a comprehensive introduction that charts the growth of, and challenges to, a nationalist literary tradition, the essays in this History illuminate the cultural and political intricacies of New Zealand literature, surveying the multilayered verse, fiction and drama of such diverse writers as Katherine Mansfield, Allen Curnow, Frank Sargeson, Janet Frame, Keri Hulme, Witi Ihimaera and Patricia Grace. Written by a host of leading scholars, this History devotes special attention to the lasting significance of colonialism, biculturalism and multiculturalism in New Zealand literature. A History of New Zealand Literature is of pivotal importance to the development of New Zealand writing and will serve as an invaluable reference for specialists and students alike.

The Elusive Curve

Like kangaroos jumping around – upside down. An upside-down, Sydney Harbour Bridge. Upside down people, jumping out of planes with parachutes. Show us anything, but ridiculous CGI! And this whole subject – can be put to bed!

The Elusive Curve

Considered an expert by his peers – after successfully selling his cutting-edge patented technology – Max was suddenly free from the daily grind. But his lifestyle and reality were about to be rocked by a single notion that would go against modern-day science; and a concept that he had never even in his wildest dreams considered. Max still recalls the day he heard the two words – ‘flat’ and ‘earth’ – combined; which unbeknown to him at the time, would change his life forever. And although the concept initially triggered wild emotions beyond his control, Max soon came to the realization that the world around him was not exactly what he thought. The epiphany changed his entire outlook on life. Join Max on his journey as he attempts to convince his friends that the shape of the Earth is not what they know, while he plans for a mission to discover more land on Earth with his ambitious and somewhat crazy plan to acquire a High Altitude Pseudo-Satellite (HAPS) to prove the shape of the earth – one way or another.

Encyclopedia of Post Colonial Literatures in English

... Amreeta 1070 Sydney 1576 Sydney Bridge Upside Down 95, 1138 Sydney Clouts Memorial Prize24 Sydney Daily Telegraph 316, 1213 Sydney Delivered 171 Sydney Gazette 1363, 1555, 1556 'Sydney International Exhibition' 760 Sydney Morning ...

Encyclopedia of Post Colonial Literatures in English

Post-Colonial Literatures in English, together with English Literature and American Literature, form one of the three major groupings of literature in English, and, as such, are widely studied around the world. Their significance derives from the richness and variety of experience which they reflect. In three volumes, this Encyclopedia documents the history and development of this body of work and includes original research relating to the literatures of some 50 countries and territories. In more than 1,600 entries written by more than 600 internationally recognized scholars, it explores the effect of the colonial and post-colonial experience on literatures in English worldwide.

Upside Down and Blindfolded

that the Sydney Harbor Bridge was a smaller bridge belies the reality. The Bayonne Bridge has only two narrow lanes in both directions and a small sidewalk for pedestrians. The Sydney Harbor Bridge, on the other hand, has three broad ...

Upside Down and Blindfolded

What might a two-month visit to Australia and New Zealand be like if the traveler were not distracted and overwhelmed by the spectacular scenery? In this book Dan Pukstas, a blind professor, answers this question by providing a series of humorous and insightful perspectives about the places and people he encountered. Whether he is trying to find his way out of a strange restroom or climbing to the summit of a dormant volcano after by-pass surgery, Dan is ready with a philosophical quip or amusing observation. In the company of his wife Nancy, Dan covers a broad geographical area from Auckland to Adelaide, from Ayers Rock to Sydney, and from Cairns to Brisbane along 2000 kilometers of Queensland highway. His topics of interest are just as broad-from his observations about food, wine prices, parenting styles, public transportation, human behavior to the joys and challenges of travel for the visually impaired. Those who like witty and pointed observations served up with a modest amount of inspiration will find this book a tasty treat. Those who have healthy vision might also find that they will see things a bit more clearly after reading this book.

A Fence Around the Cuckoo

... Introduced by Jennifer Down The Multiple Effects of Rainshadow Thea Astley Introduced by Chloe Hooper Drylands Thea Astley Introduced by Emily Maguire Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down ...

A Fence Around the Cuckoo

The first volume of autobiography by celebrated writer Ruth Park, author of The Harp in the South, and winner of the Miles Franklin Award, the Age Book of the Year and the Colin Roderick Award.

The Multiple Effects of Rainshadow

... Introduced by Jennifer Down The Multiple Effects of Rainshadow Thea Astley Introduced by Chloe Hooper Drylands Thea Astley Introduced by Emily Maguire Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down ...

The Multiple Effects of Rainshadow

There are distant shouts, rifle shots, the pounding of feet across the bridge, the sound of running. A woman’s scream carves the night then bubbles away. In 1930 the superintendent of a mission on a Queensland island, driven mad by his wife’s death, goes on a murderous rampage. Fearing for their lives, the other whites arm a young Indigenous man and order him to shoot Uncle Boss dead. The Multiple Effects of Rainshadow traces the lead-up to this bloody showdown and the repercussions in the years after—for Aboriginal people and the colonial overseers. Thea Astley was born in Brisbane in 1925. Her first novel, Girl with a Monkey, was published in 1958 and her third, The Well Dressed Explorer (1962), won the Miles Franklin Literary Award. Many notable books followed, among them the groundbreaking A Kindness Cup (1974), which addressed frontier massacres of Indigenous Australians, and It’s Raining in Mango (1987). Her last novel was Drylands (1999), her fourth Miles Franklin winner. Her fiction is distinguished by vivid imagery and metaphor; a complex, ironic style; and a desire to highlight oppression and social injustice. One of the most distinctive and influential Australian novelists of the twentieth century, Astley died in 2004. A lifelong chain-smoker famed for her sharp wit, Thea Astley died in 2004, the year after her husband died. She remains one of the most distinctive and influential Australian novelists of the twentieth century. ‘Passion, brilliance and originality.’ Sydney Morning Herald ‘Formidable...Uniquely provocative, acerbic and glittering.’ Australian

Honour Other People s Children

... Introduced by Jennifer Down The Multiple Effects of Rainshadow Thea Astley Introduced by Chloe Hooper Drylands Thea Astley Introduced by Emily Maguire Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down ...

Honour   Other People   s Children

Two novellas about the deep connections we forge with the people we love, and the pain of breaking those connections. In Honour, Kathleen and Frank are amicably separated, in contact through shared parenting of their young daughter, Flo. But when Frank finds a new partner and wants a divorce, Kathleen is hurt. And Flo can’t understand why they all can’t live together. In Other People’s Children, Ruth and Scotty live in a big share house that’s breaking up. Scotty is trying to hold on, remembering the early days of telling life stories and laughter and singing—and when the kids were everyone’s kids. But now the bitterness has crept in and their friendship is broken. Ruth is ready to move on—and she’ll take her kids with her. Helen Garner writes novels, stories, screenplays and works of non-fiction. In 2006 she received the inaugural Melbourne Prize for Literature, and in 2016 she won the prestigious Windham-Campbell Prize for non-fiction and the Western Australian Premier’s Book Award. Her book of essays Everywhere I Look won the 2017 Indie Book Award for Non-Fiction. ‘Garner is scrupulous, painstaking, and detailed, with sharp eyes and ears. She is everywhere at once, watching and listening, a recording angel at life’s secular apocalypses...her unillusioned eye makes her clarity compulsive.’ James Wood, New Yorker ‘She drills into experience and comes up with such clean, precise distillations of life, once you read them they enter into you. Successive generations of writers have felt the keen influence of her work and for this reason Garner has become part of us all.’ Weekend Australian ‘Helen Garner’s collections of fiction and non-fiction corroborate her reputation as a great stylist and a great witness.’ Peter Craven, Australian

Shooting Star

... Introduced by Jennifer Down The Multiple Effects of Rainshadow Thea Astley Introduced by Chloe Hooper Drylands Thea Astley Introduced by Emily Maguire Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down ...

Shooting Star

Shooting Star is classic Peter Temple, and now a Text Classic.

A Stairway to Paradise

... Introduced by Jennifer Down The Multiple Effects of Rainshadow Thea Astley Introduced by Chloe Hooper Drylands Thea Astley Introduced by Emily Maguire Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down ...

A Stairway to Paradise

Alex and Andrew are friends. And Barbara...Barbara is a goddess. Here is the eternal triangle, the story of three people in an unhappy tangle of emotions, none able to articulate the precise quality of their longing and dissatisfaction. Are any of them truly interested in reaching the ‘paradise’ they claim to be seeking, or are they actually trying to avoid it? In St. John’s hands, what is commonplace is transformed and transcendent. This is the work of an extraordinary writer. MADELEINE ST JOHN was born in Sydney in 1941. Her father, Edward, was a barrister and Liberal politician. Her mother, Sylvette, committed suicide in 1954, when Madeleine was twelve. Her death, she later said, ‘obviously changed everything’. St John studied Arts at Sydney University, where her contemporaries included Bruce Beresford, Germaine Greer, Clive James and Robert Hughes. In 1965 she married Chris Tillam, a fellow student, and they moved to the United States where they first attended Stanford and later Cambridge. From Cambridge, St John relocated to London in 1968 with the hope that Chris would follow. The couple did not reunite and the marriage ended. St John settled in Notting Hill. She worked at a series of odd jobs, and then, in 1993, published her first novel, The Women in Black, the only book she set in Australia. When her third novel, The Essence of the Thing (1997), was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, she became the first Australian woman to receive this honour. St John died in 2006. She had been so incensed after seeing errors in a French edition of one of her novels that she stipulated in her will that there were to be no more translations of her work. ‘Not much in the way of folly escapes Madeleine St John, and the oubliette she opens into the darker reaches of the spirit is unsettling.’ The Times ‘St John proves herself a comic, humane observer.’ Newsday ‘Madeleine St John is brilliant on the elliptical way lovers talk to each other.’ Daily Telegraph

A Kindness Cup

... Introduced by Jennifer Down The Multiple Effects of Rainshadow Thea Astley Introduced by Chloe Hooper Drylands Thea Astley Introduced by Emily Maguire Homesickness Murray Bail Introduced by Peter Conrad Sydney Bridge Upside Down ...

A Kindness Cup

I told them to go into the scrub and disperse the tribe. Disperse? That is a strange word. What do you mean by dispersing? Firing at them. Two decades after a massacre of local Aboriginal people, the former residents of a Queensland town have reunited to celebrate the progress and prosperity of their community. Tom Dorahy, returning to his hometown, is having none of it: he wants those responsible to own up to their actions. A reckoning with oppression, guilt and the weight of the past, A Kindness Cup is one of Thea Astley’s greatest achievements. Thea Astley was born in Brisbane in 1925. Her first novel, Girl with a Monkey, was published in 1958 and her third, The Well Dressed Explorer (1962), won the Miles Franklin Literary Award. Many notable books followed, among them the groundbreaking A Kindness Cup (1974), which addressed frontier massacres of Indigenous Australians, and It’s Raining in Mango (1987). Her last novel was Drylands (1999), her fourth Miles Franklin winner. Her fiction is distinguished by vivid imagery and metaphor; a complex, ironic style; and a desire to highlight oppression and social injustice. One of the most distinctive and influential Australian novelists of the twentieth century, Astley died in 2004. ‘Smart, compassionate.’ New York Times ‘One of the earliest and most empathetic postwar engagements by a white Australian writer with the horrors of nineteenth-century racial violence.’ Australian Book Review ‘This timely and attractively priced reissue is a welcome chance to reconsider [Astley’s] rich oeuvre. Astley’s work is characterised by her irony and unflinching scrutiny of social injustice. In A Kindness Cup, she was at the top of her impressive form...This short novel is one of Australia’s finest.’ Stuff NZ