Tacitus History of Politically Effective Speech

The volume goes beyond literary analysis of the texts to create a new framework for studying this essential period in ancient Roman history, much in the same way that Tacitus himself recasts the political authority and presence of ...

Tacitus    History of Politically Effective Speech

This study examines how Tacitus' representation of speech determines the roles of speakers within the political sphere, and explores the possibility of politically effective speech in the principate. It argues against the traditional scholarly view that Tacitus refuses to offer a positive view of senatorial power in the principate: while senators did experience limitations and changes to what they could achieve in public life, they could aim to create a dimension of political power and efficacy through speeches intended to create and sustain relations which would in turn determine the roles played by both senators or an emperor. Ellen O'Gorman traces Tacitus' own charting of these modes of speech, from flattery and aggression to advice, praise, and censure, and explores how different modes of speech in his histories should be evaluated: not according to how they conform to pre-existing political stances, but as they engender different political worlds in the present and future. The volume goes beyond literary analysis of the texts to create a new framework for studying this essential period in ancient Roman history, much in the same way that Tacitus himself recasts the political authority and presence of senatorial speakers as narrative and historical analysis.

Tacitus History of Politically Effective Speech

The volume goes beyond literary analysis of the texts to create a new framework for studying this essential period in ancient Roman history, much in the same way that Tacitus himself recasts the political authority and presence of ...

Tacitus  History of Politically Effective Speech

"This study examines how Tacitus' representation of speech determines the roles of speakers within the political sphere, and explores the possibility of politically effective speech in the principate. It argues against the traditional scholarly view that Tacitus refuses to offer a positive view of senatorial power in the principate: while senators did experience limitations and changes to what they could achieve in public life, they could aim to create a dimension of political power and efficacy through speeches intended to create and sustain relations which would in turn determine the roles played by both senators or an emperor. Ellen O'Gorman traces Tacitus' own charting of these modes of speech, from flattery and aggression to advice, praise, and censure, and explores how different modes of speech in his histories should be evaluated: not according to how they conform to pre-existing political stances, but as they engender different political worlds in the present and future. The volume goes beyond literary analysis of the texts to create a new framework for studying this essential period in ancient Roman history, much in the same way that Tacitus himself recasts the political authority and presence of senatorial speakers as narrative and historical analysis"--

Tacitus History of Politically Effective Speech

Title: Tacitus' history of politically effective speech : truth to power / Ellen O'Gorman. Description: London; New York, NY: Bloomsbury Academic, 2020. | Includes bibliographical references and index. | Summary: “This study examines ...

Tacitus    History of Politically Effective Speech

This study examines how Tacitus' representation of speech determines the roles of speakers within the political sphere, and explores the possibility of politically effective speech in the principate. It argues against the traditional scholarly view that Tacitus refuses to offer a positive view of senatorial power in the principate: while senators did experience limitations and changes to what they could achieve in public life, they could aim to create a dimension of political power and efficacy through speeches intended to create and sustain relations which would in turn determine the roles played by both senators or an emperor. Ellen O'Gorman traces Tacitus' own charting of these modes of speech, from flattery and aggression to advice, praise, and censure, and explores how different modes of speech in his histories should be evaluated: not according to how they conform to pre-existing political stances, but as they engender different political worlds in the present and future. The volume goes beyond literary analysis of the texts to create a new framework for studying this essential period in ancient Roman history, much in the same way that Tacitus himself recasts the political authority and presence of senatorial speakers as narrative and historical analysis.

Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography

Tacitus' History of Politically Effective Speech: Truth to Power, London. Paratore, E. (1951). Tacito, Milan. Pelling, C. (1999). “Epilogue”, in C.S. Kraus (ed.), The Limits of Historiography: Genre and Narrative in Ancient Historical ...

Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography

Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography contains 11 articles on how the Ancient Roman historians used, and manipulated, the past. Key themes include the impact of autocracy, the nature of intertextuality, and the frontiers between history and other genres.

Unspoken Rome

Tacitus' History of Politically Effective Speech. Truth to Power. London. O'Hara, J. J. 2010. 'The Unfinished Aeneid?', in Farrell, J. and Putnam, M. C. J. (eds.) A Companion to Vergil's Aeneid and Its Tradition.

Unspoken Rome

Showcases innovative approaches to Latin literature by reading textual absence as a generative force for literary interpretation and reception. Includes chapters by a wide range of scholars, covering some of the main authors of the Latin literary tradition, often in dialogue with modern literature and philosophy.

Tacitus

Tacitus is presented as a moralist, psychologist, political analyst and literary artist. Tacitus' greatest impact has never been on historians.

Tacitus

The histories of Roman senator Cornelius Tacitus constitute the most influential examination of tyranny, political behavior and public morality from the classical age. For centuries these portraits of courageous martyrs to freedom, of paranoid tyrants, and of sycophantic flatteres and informers shaped modern political attitudes. Ronald Mellor provides a compelling analysis of the ideas of the greatest historian of evil in the western intellectual tradition. In "Tacitus," Ronald Mellor passionately argues for reclaiming this ironic genius whose cynical world view is particularly well-suited to an analysis of the tyranny and brutality in our own century. Tacitus is presented as a moralist, psychologist, political analyst and literary artist. Tacitus' greatest impact has never been on historians. Rather, his political vision and dramatic images left their mark on painters, poets and thinkers.

Freedom of Speech in Early Stuart England

92 In the early Dialogus , Tacitus makes two of his speakers offer very different perspectives on frank speech . ... Burke , “ Tacitism , Scepticism , and Reason of State ' , in The Cambridge History of Political Thought 1450–1700 ...

Freedom of Speech in Early Stuart England

Attending to the importance of context and decorum, this major contribution to Ideas in Context recovers a tradition of free speech that has been obscured in studies of the evolution of universal rights."--BOOK JACKET.

The Roman Historians

Quintilian, who during Tacitus' youth became the first official professor of rhetoric at Rome, regarded history as a ... His rhetorical training informs every page of his histories, but it is most obvious in his reliance on speeches to ...

The Roman Historians

The Romans' devotion to their past pervades almost every aspect of their culture. But the clearest image of how the Romans wished to interpret their past is found in their historical writings. This book examines in detail the major Roman historians: * Sallust * Livy * Tacitus * Ammianus as well as the biographies written by: * Nepos * Tacitus * Suetonius * the Augustan History * the autobiographies of Julius Caesar and the Emperor Augustus. Ronald Mellor demonstrates that Roman historical writing was regarded by its authors as a literary not a scholarly exercise, and how it must be evaluated in that context. He shows that history writing reflected the political structures of ancient Rome under the different regimes.

The Cambridge Companion to Tacitus

The battle for history In the year 4 8 indigenous nobles with Roman citizenship from Gallia Comata sought the right to ... speech has survived on an inscription discovered at Lyon in 152833 and can be compared with the version Tacitus ...

The Cambridge Companion to Tacitus

Tacitus is universally recognised as ancient Rome's greatest writer of history, and his account of the Roman Empire in the first century AD has been fundamental in shaping the modern perception of Rome and its emperors. This Companion provides a new, up-to-date and authoritative assessment of his work and influence which will be invaluable for students and non-specialists as well as of interest to established scholars in the field. First situating Tacitus within the tradition of Roman historical writing and his own contemporary society, it goes on to analyse each of his individual works and then discuss key topics such as his distinctive authorial voice and his views of history and freedom. It ends by tracing Tacitus' reception, beginning with the transition from manuscript to printed editions, describing his influence on political thought in early modern Europe, and concluding with his significance in the twentieth century.

The Historians of Ancient Rome

It is Tacitus who provides the only opportunity to check a literary speech against the text as delivered. ... In Athens or republican Rome, a speech was a political act and Sallust so records Caesar's and Cato's proposals for the ...

The Historians of Ancient Rome

The Historians of Ancient Rome is the most comprehensive collection of ancient sources for Roman history available in a single English volume, with extensive passages from more than a dozen Greek and Roman historians and biographers tracing the history of Rome over more than a thousand years: from the city’s foundation by Romulus in 753 B.C.E. (Livy) to Constantine’s edict of toleration for Christianity (313 C.E.)

The History of Make Believe

This is a serious book, informed by wide reading, and full of startlingly original insights on some of the most prominent and significant themes in Tacitus’s works.

The History of Make Believe

"In The History of Make-Believe, Holly Haynes acutely queries the relationship of historiography, historical reality, and symbolic representations of lived historical processes. This is a serious book, informed by wide reading, and full of startlingly original insights on some of the most prominent and significant themes in Tacitus’s works. Indeed, it deserves close attention by anyone interested in the political and social strategies of high Imperial Rome."—T. Corey Brennan, author of The Praetorship in the Roman Republic "In Tacitus the historical truth is conveyed in literary truth-telling. Instead of leaving the two separated as we do, Holly Haynes shows that Tacitus put them together in what she calls the combination ‘make-believe.’ Her book shines with originality and intelligence while opening the way to Tacitus’s canny wisdom."—Harvey Mansfield, author of Machiavelli's Virtue

The History of Make Believe

Its metamorphosis into an item of speech, an emphasis that Tacitus chooses to give the event, disrupts and usurps the actual occurrence of this potentially important political event, implying that Nero's legacy ...

The History of Make Believe

A theoretically sophisticated and illuminating reading of Tacitus, especially the Histories, this work points to a new understanding of the logic of Roman rule during the early Empire. Tacitus, in Holly Haynes’ analysis, does not write about the reality of imperial politics and culture but about the imaginary picture that imperial society makes of these concrete conditions of existence—the "making up and believing" that figure in both the subjective shaping of reality and the objective interpretation of it. Haynes traces Tacitus’s development of this fingere/credere dynamic both backward and forward from the crucial year A.D. 69. Using recent theories of ideology, especially within the Marxist and psychoanalytic traditions, she exposes the psychic logic lurking behind the actions and inaction of the protagonists of the Histories. Her work demonstrates how Tacitus offers penetrating insights into the conditions of historical knowledge and into the psychic logic of power and its vicissitudes, from Augustus through the Flavians. By clarifying an explicit acknowledgment of the difficult relationship between res and verba, in the Histories, Haynes shows how Tacitus calls into question the possibility of objective knowing—how he may in fact be the first to allow readers to separate the objectively knowable from the objectively unknowable. Thus, Tacitus appears here as going further toward identifying the object of historical inquiry—and hence toward an "objective" rendering of history—than most historians before or since.

Tacitus Annals V and VI

have a fundamental political purpose -- to justify his conduct against his political cnemies . ... B.C. respectively ) C. Sallustius Crispus ( Sallust ) had chosen for his first historical work the subject that Cicero had vainly sought ...

Tacitus  Annals V and VI

Books V and VI of Tacitus' Annals , when complete, carried the narrative of Tiberius' reign from A.D. 29 to 37. Unfortunately most of Book V has been lost, but Annals VI, which resumes the narrative 2 weeks after the execution of Sejanus, contains a fascinating variety of incidents.

Irony and Misreading in the Annals of Tacitus

This 2000 book examines Tacitus' Annals as an ironic portrayal of Julio-Claudian Rome, through close analysis of passages in which characters engage in interpretation and misreading.

Irony and Misreading in the Annals of Tacitus

This 2000 book examines Tacitus' Annals as an ironic portrayal of Julio-Claudian Rome, through close analysis of passages in which characters engage in interpretation and misreading. By representing the misreading of signifying systems - such as speech, gesture, writing, social structures and natural phenomena - Tacitus obliquely comments upon the perversion of Rome's republican structure in the new principate. Furthermore, this study argues that the distinctively obscure style of the Annals is used by Tacitus to draw his reader into the ambiguities and compromises of the political regime it represents. The strain on language and meaning both portrayed and enacted by the Annals in this way gives voice to a form of political protest to which the reader must respond in the course of interpreting the narrative.

Ordering Anarchy

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Ordering Anarchy

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History and Silence

Tacitus has his emperors advised to guard very carefully the arcana imperii, “secrets of rule. ... Just so, the damnatiomemoriae must be dissimulated inorder tobe effective,and for forgetfulness towork itmust somehow escape notice.

History and Silence

The ruling elite in ancient Rome sought to eradicate even the memory of their deceased opponents through a process now known as damnatio memoriae. These formal and traditional practices included removing the person's name and image from public monuments and inscriptions, making it illegal to speak of him, and forbidding funeral observances and mourning. Paradoxically, however, while these practices dishonored the person's memory, they did not destroy it. Indeed, a later turn of events could restore the offender not only to public favor but also to re-inclusion in the public record. This book examines the process of purge and rehabilitation of memory in the person of Virius Nicomachus Flavianus(?-394). Charles Hedrick describes how Flavian was condemned for participating in the rebellion against the Christian emperor Theodosius the Great—and then restored to the public record a generation later as members of the newly Christianized senatorial class sought to reconcile their pagan past and Christian present. By selectively remembering and forgetting the actions of Flavian, Hedrick asserts, the Roman elite honored their ancestors while participating in profound social, cultural, and religious change.

The Cambridge History of Political Thought 1450 1700

228 ) ; and finally that freedom of speech ' is not only compatible with civil peace , piety and the right of the ... the use of religion as an instrument of political power also reflect his careful reading of Tacitus and Machiavelli .

The Cambridge History of Political Thought 1450 1700

This book, first published in 1992, presents a comprehensive scholarly account of the development of European political thinking through the Renaissance and the reformation to the 'scientific revolution' and political upheavals of the seventeenth century. It is written by a highly distinguished team of contributors.

A History of Literary Criticism

What need is there of long speeches in the senate, he asks, “when political questions are decided not by an ignorant ... (Tacitus, pp. 768–769). Perhaps not far beneath the surface of these comments is an underlying longing for the ...

A History of Literary Criticism

This comprehensive guide to the history of literary criticism from antiquity to the present day provides an authoritative overview of the major movements, figures, and texts of literary criticism, as well as surveying their cultural, historical, and philosophical contexts. Supplies the cultural, historical and philosophical background to the literary criticism of each era Enables students to see the development of literary criticism in context Organised chronologically, from classical literary criticism through to deconstruction Considers a wide range of thinkers and events from the French Revolution to Freud’s views on civilization Can be used alongside any anthology of literary criticism or as a coherent stand-alone introduction

Theories of Tyranny

In a passage somewhat astonishing to twentieth - century political and economic assumptions , Tacitus claimed that ... History tells us that the Gauls too had their hour of military glory ; but since that time a life of ease has made ...

Theories of Tyranny

Ch. 10 (pp. 381-454), "Fromm, Neumann, and Arendt: Three Early Interpretations of Nazi Germany", discusses the views of Franz Neumann and Hannah Arendt on Nazi antisemitism. Neumann, in his "Behemoth" (1942), stated that the Nazis needed a fictitious enemy in order to unify the completely atomized German society into one large "Volksgemeinschaft". The terrorization of Jews was a prototype of the terror to be used against other peoples. Arendt contends in "The Origins of Totalitarianism" (1951) that it was imperialism which brought about Nazism, Nazi antisemitism, and the Holocaust. Totalitarianism is nothing but imperialism which came home. Insofar as imperialism transcends national boundaries, racism may be very helpful for it, because racism proposes another principle to define the enemy. Jews and other ethnic groups (e.g. Slavs) became easy targets as groups whose claims clashed with those of the expanding German nation. Terror is the essence of totalitarianism, and extermination camps were necessary for the Nazis to prove the omnipotence of their regime and their capability of total domination.

The Oxford Handbook of Rhetorical Studies

The virtual life of forensic rhetoric supports Goodrich's more general historical claim ... democratic institutions of the city, above all by the deliberative procedures of the Assembly (ecclēsia), the main forum for political speech.

The Oxford Handbook of Rhetorical Studies

One of the most remarkable trends in the humanities and social sciences in recent decades has been the resurgence of interest in the history, theory, and practice of rhetoric: in an age of global media networks and viral communication, rhetoric is once again "contagious" and "communicable" (Friedrich Nietzsche). Featuring sixty commissioned chapters by eminent scholars of rhetoric from twelve countries, The Oxford Handbook of Rhetorical Studies offers students and teachers an engaging and sophisticated introduction to the multidisciplinary field of rhetorical studies. The Handbook traces the history of Western rhetoric from ancient Greece and Rome to the present and surveys the role of rhetoric in more than thirty academic disciplines and fields of social practice. This combination of historical and topical approaches allows readers to chart the metamorphoses of rhetoric over the centuries while mapping the connections between rhetoric and law, politics, science, education, literature, feminism, poetry, composition, philosophy, drama, criticism, digital media, art, semiotics, architecture, and other fields. Chapters provide the information expected of a handbook-discussion of key concepts, texts, authors, problems, and critical debates-while also posing challenging questions and advancing new arguments. In addition to offering an accessible and comprehensive introduction to rhetoric in the European and North American context, the Handbook includes a timeline of major works of rhetorical theory, translations of all Greek and Latin passages, extensive cross-referencing between chapters, and a glossary of more than three hundred rhetorical terms. These features will make this volume a valuable scholarly resource for students and teachers in rhetoric, English, classics, comparative literature, media studies, communication, and adjacent fields. As a whole, the Handbook demonstrates that rhetoric is not merely a form of stylish communication but a pragmatic, inventive, and critical art that operates in myriad social contexts and academic disciplines.