Taming Democracy

In this highly provocative book, Terry Bouton challenges the received wisdom about what was achieved in 1776, arguing that the American Revolution did not produce the democracy that was hoped for by the American people when they joined the ...

Taming Democracy

Americans see the Founding Fathers as selfless patriots who fought British tyranny and brought democracy to the land. But in this award-winning book, Terry Bouton reveals that as the War for Independence ended, the Revolutionary elite began to abandon democratic ideas to embrace instead a new vision where government worked to transfer wealth to "moneyed men." Centering on Pennsylvania, the symbolic center of democracy's rise, Bouton shows intimately how the war and the events that followed (such as the misnamed Whiskey Rebellion) affected the majority of "the people," introducing us to the Revolution's unsung heroes - farmers, weavers, and tailors who risked their lives to create democracy and then to defend it against what they called the forces of "united avarice." We also get a starkly new look some familiar characters from the Revolution, including Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, Robert Morris, and George Washington, men who Bouton portrays as real, flawed people, blinded by their own sense of entitlement.

Taming Democracy

Harvey Yunis looks at how these three—historian, philosopher, politician respectively—explored the instructive potential of political rhetoric as a means of "taming democracy," Plato's metaphor for controlling the fractious demos ...

Taming Democracy

How does one speak to a large, diverse mass of ordinary, sovereign citizens and persuade them to render wise decisions? For Thucydides, Plato, and Demosthenes, who observed classical Athenian democracy in action, this was an urgent question. Harvey Yunis looks at how these three—historian, philosopher, politician respectively—explored the instructive potential of political rhetoric as a means of "taming democracy," Plato's metaphor for controlling the fractious demos through language. Yunis offers new insights into the ideas of the three thinkers: Thucydides' bipolar model of Periclean versus demagogic rhetoric; Plato's engagement with political rhetoric in the Gorgias, the Phaedrus, and the Laws; and Demosthenes' attempt both to instruct and to persuade his political audience. Yunis illuminates both the concrete historical problem of political deliberation in Athens and the intellectual and literary responses that the problem evoked. Few, if any, other books on classical Athens afford such a combination of perspectives from history, drama, philosophy, and politics. Writing with unusual clarity and cogency, Yunis translates all texts and explains the relevant issues. His book can profitably be read by anyone concerned with the issues at the heart of classical and contemporary democracy.

Taming Democracy

Publisher description

Taming Democracy

The narrative that has been passed down through the centuries is that the war was a triumph for ordinary people and their ideas of liberty and freedom. In this highly provocative book, Terry Bouton challenges this received wisdom about what was achieved in 1776. He argues that the American Revolution did not produce the democracy that was hoped for by the American people when they joined the Revolutionary movement. Bouton looks at rich and poor, urban and rural, patriots and loyalists, Revolutionary leaders and founding Fathers, merchants and artisans, farmers and laborers. This economic and political analysis examines the effects of British taxation, changes in global trade, currency crises, and how they impacted ordinary people, who resisted the new federal Constitution and formed their own democratic initiatives.

Taming Democracy

The one democratic victory in the saga of the Constitution, and it was a big victory, came later, when widespread ... Meanwhile, the new Pennsylvania constitution signaled but the beginning of wide-ranging efforts to tame democracy ...

Taming Democracy

Americans are fond of reflecting upon the Founding Fathers, the noble group of men who came together to force out the tyranny of the British and bring democracy to the land. Unfortunately, as Terry Bouton shows in this highly provocative first book, the Revolutionary elite often seemed as determined to squash democracy after the war as they were to support it before. Centering on Pennsylvania, the symbolic and logistical center of the Revolution, Bouton shows how this radical shift in ideology spelled tragedy for hundreds of common people. Leading up to the Revolution, Pennsylvanians were united in their opinion that "the people" (i.e. white men) should be given access to the political system, and that some degree of wealth equality (i.e. among white men) was required to ensure that political freedom prevailed. As the war ended, Pennsylvania's elites began brushing aside these ideas, using their political power to pass laws to enrich their own estates and hinder political organization by their opponents. By the 1780s, they had reenacted many of the same laws that they had gone to war to abolish, returning Pennsylvania to a state of economic depression and political hegemony. This unhappy situation led directly to the Whiskey and Fries rebellions, popular uprisings both put down by federal armies. Bouton's work reveals a unique perspective, showing intimately how the war and the events that followed affected poor farmers and working people. Bouton introduces us to unsung heroes from this time--farmers, weavers, and tailors who put their lives on hold to fight to save democracy from the forces of "united avarice." We also get a starkly new look at some familiar characters from the Revolution, including Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, and George Washington, who Bouton strives to make readers see as real, flawed people, blinded by their own sense of entitlement. Taming Democracy represents a turning point in how we view the outcomes of the Revolutionary War and the motivations of the powerful men who led it. Its eye-opening revelations and insights make it an essential read for all readers with a passion for uncovering the true history of America.

Rancire Public Education and the Taming of Democracy

These ideas are discussed by the contributors of this volume alongside those of Foucault, Derrida, Freire, and Butler.

Rancire  Public Education and the Taming of Democracy

Rancière, Public Education and the Taming of Democracy introduces the political and educational ideas of Jacques Rancière, a leading philosopher increasingly important in educational theory. In light of his ideas, the volume explores the current concern for democracy and equality in relation to education. The book introduces and discusses the works of Jacques Rancière, a leading philosopher increasingly important in the field of educational theory and philosophy The volume will have a broad appeal to those in the field of education theory and philosophy, and those concerned with democracy, equal opportunities and pedagogy Balanced in its introduction of the political and educational ideas of this author and in its exploration in line with his work of some important issues in education and policy today Contributors from diverse countries and intellectual and cultural backgrounds, including the UK, US, Belgium, Sweden, Spain, France, Canada

The Taming of Democracy Assistance

This book provides new understanding of foreign influence and moral actors in world politics, with policy implications for democracy in the Middle East.

The Taming of Democracy Assistance

Few government programs that aid democracy abroad today seek to foster regime change. Technical programs that do not confront dictators are more common than the aid to dissidents and political parties that once dominated the field. What explains this 'taming' of democracy assistance? This book offers the first analysis of that puzzle. In contrast to previous research on democracy aid, it focuses on the survival instincts of the non-governmental organizations (NGOs) that design and implement democracy assistance. To survive, Sarah Bush argues that NGOs seek out tamer types of aid, especially as they become more professional. Diverse evidence - including three decades of new project-level data, case studies of democracy assistance in Jordan and Tunisia, and primary documents gathered from NGO archives - supports the argument. This book provides new understanding of foreign influence and moral actors in world politics, with policy implications for democracy in the Middle East.

Taming the Gods

Finally, he reconsiders the story of radical Islam in contemporary Europe, from the case of Salman Rushdie to the murder of Theo van Gogh.

Taming the Gods

For eight years the president of the United States was a born-again Christian, backed by well-organized evangelicals who often seemed intent on erasing the church-state divide. In Europe, the increasing number of radicalized Muslims is creating widespread fear that Islam is undermining Western-style liberal democracy. And even in polytheistic Asia, the development of democracy has been hindered in some countries, particularly China, by a long history in which religion was tightly linked to the state. Ian Buruma is the first writer to provide a sharp-eyed look at the tensions between religion and politics on three continents. Drawing on many contemporary and historical examples, he argues that the violent passions inspired by religion must be tamed in order to make democracy work. Comparing the United States and Europe, Buruma asks why so many Americans--and so few Europeans--see religion as a help to democracy. Turning to China and Japan, he disputes the notion that only monotheistic religions pose problems for secular politics. Finally, he reconsiders the story of radical Islam in contemporary Europe, from the case of Salman Rushdie to the murder of Theo van Gogh. Sparing no one, Buruma exposes the follies of the current culture war between defenders of "Western values" and "multiculturalists," and explains that the creation of a democratic European Islam is not only possible, but necessary. Presenting a challenge to dogmatic believers and dogmatic secularists alike, Taming the Gods powerfully argues that religion and democracy can be compatible--but only if religious and secular authorities are kept firmly apart.

The Rebirth of Dialogue

Dodds, “Commentary,” Gorgias, 355–56, 360–61, 364; Irwin, “Notes,” Gorgias, 234–39; Wardy, The Birth of Rhetoric, 84–85; Yunis, Taming Democracy, 146–53. 102. Kahn, Plato and the Socratic Dialogue, 129–31, maintains, however, ...

The Rebirth of Dialogue

Offers a fundamental rethinking of the rhetorical tradition as dialogue.

The Democracy Deficit

Economic globalization has had a chilling effect on democracy since markets now do some of the work that governments used to do through the political process.

The Democracy Deficit

Economic globalization has had a chilling effect on democracy since markets now do some of the work that governments used to do through the political process. More than two decades of deregulation have made a healthy economy appear to depend on unrestrained markets. But appearances are misleading—globalization is also a legal and political process. The future of democracy in the twenty-first century depends on the ability of citizens to reclaim a voice in taming globalization through domestic politics and law reform. "The book's topic could not be more important: how do we adapt contemporary democratic governance- and contemporary administrative law- to the challenge of a globalizing world?"—Kal Raustiala, UCLA School of Law Can citizens govern globalization? Aman argues that they can, and that domestic law has a crucial role to play in this process. He proposes to redefine the legal distinction between public and private to correspond to the realities of the new role of the private sector in delivering public services, and thereby to bring crucial sectors of globalization back within the scope of democratic reform. Basing his argument on the history of the policies that led to globalization, and the current policies that sustain it, Aman advocates specific reforms meant to increase private citizens' influence on globalization. He looks at particular problem areas usually thought to be domestic in nature, such as privatization, prisons, prescription drugs, and the minimum wage, as well as constitutional structural issues such as federalism and separation of powers.

The Taming of Democracy Assistance

Any convergence on tame approaches within the democracy establishment has thus taken place in the absence of clear causal knowledge that such programs effectively democratize countries. The severe impediments to creating such causal ...

The Taming of Democracy Assistance

Most government programs seeking to aid democracy abroad do not directly confront dictators. This book explains how organizational politics 'tamed' democracy assistance.

Kenya s Quest for Democracy

Tracing the trajectory of postcolonial politics, Makau Mutua maps the political forces that have shaped contemporary Kenya.

Kenya s Quest for Democracy

Tracing the trajectory of postcolonial politics, Makau Mutua maps the political forces that have shaped contemporary Kenya. He also critically explores efforts on the part of both civil society and the political opposition to reform the state. Analyzing the tortuous efforts since independence to create a sustainable, democratic state, he uses the struggle over constitutional reform as a window for understanding the larger struggles confronting Kenyan society.

Taming Politics

A further objective is to demonstrate how he draws on democratic ideology to advance his own political theory. Accordingly, this book will expose numerous intertextual connections of Plato with other authors of this epoch.

Taming Politics

Plato is often reproached for having a distorted view of democracy due to prejudice and an elitist philosophical approach. Such objections are not utterly groundless, but they miss the gist of the matter. One of the main aims of this study is to show that, while conceiving his critique of democracy, Plato has a clear perception of its development and elements. A further objective is to demonstrate how he draws on democratic ideology to advance his own political theory. Accordingly, this book will expose numerous intertextual connections of Plato with other authors of this epoch. The first and greater part of this study reveals how in the "Gorgias" Plato gives a detailed account on the process of democratic man's transformation into tyrannical man. The second part examines the parallels between this dialogue and the "Republic". Thus, Plato's intimate knowledge of democratic ideology shows that his criticism of phenomena such as absolute freedom, demagoguery (populism), glorification of power, traditional politics etc. remains relevant.

Taming Intuition

Individuals vary in their ability to reflect on and override partisan impulses, affecting their ability to rationally evaluate politicians.

Taming Intuition

Individuals vary in their ability to reflect on and override partisan impulses, affecting their ability to rationally evaluate politicians.

Ancient and Modern Democracy

Athenian democracy, not with particular forms of evaluation that can still be found in recent literature – like talk of the mood of a 'pogrom' ... Die politischen Theorien der Antike, Cologne 1993, 55; Harvey Yunis, Taming Democracy.

Ancient and Modern Democracy


The Information Game in Democracy

In the context of one of the world's most respected and publicised democracies a provocative book Taming Democracy (Bouton 2007) shows how the founding fathers of the American Constitution, notwithstanding their high-pitched public ...

The Information Game in Democracy

This book examines democracy and governance from the unconventional and largely under researched vantage point of information. It looks at the exclusionary informational dynamics in democracy and analyses the role of information capitalism, new technology, virtual networks, cyberspace and media. While emphasizing the foundational value of information as the ‘source code’ of modern societies the book explains how it is strategically maneuvered in technologies of governance in so-called established and credible democracies. It studies the neutralization and subversion as well as the complex, nuanced and multidimensional act of othering of people, who are supposed to be the repository of power in democracy and in whose interest the business of governance is expected to be conducted. The work highlights the challenges of technocratic interpretations, stunted public policy communication, hyped information society, cooption through the state-of-the-art capitalism, rhetoric of virtual networks and the often-unilateral agenda of mainstream media. A major intervention in understanding the nature of contemporary democracy and polity, this volume will be of great interest to scholars and researchers of politics, media, political communication and technology studies.

The Democracy Project

See Bouton, Taming Democracy: “The People," the Founders, and the Troubled Ending of the American Revolution (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997). There has been a wealth of recent research on the topic: notably, Woody Holton's ...

The Democracy Project

A bold rethinking of the most powerful political idea in the world—democracy—and the story of how radical democracy can yet transform America Democracy has been the American religion since before the Revolution—from New England town halls to the multicultural democracy of Atlantic pirate ships. But can our current political system, one that seems responsive only to the wealthiest among us and leaves most Americans feeling disengaged, voiceless, and disenfranchised, really be called democratic? And if the tools of our democracy are not working to solve the rising crises we face, how can we—average citizens—make change happen? David Graeber, one of the most influential scholars and activists of his generation, takes readers on a journey through the idea of democracy, provocatively reorienting our understanding of pivotal historical moments, and extracts their lessons for today—from the birth of Athenian democracy and the founding of the United States of America to the global revolutions of the twentieth century and the rise of a new generation of activists. Underlying it all is a bracing argument that in the face of increasingly concentrated wealth and power in this country, a reenergized, reconceived democracy—one based on consensus, equality, and broad participation—can yet provide us with the just, free, and fair society we want. The Democracy Project tells the story of the resilience of the democratic spirit and the adaptability of the democratic idea. It offers a fresh take on vital history and an impassioned argument that radical democracy is, more than ever, our best hope. Praise for David Graeber’s Debt “A sprawling, erudite, provocative work.”—Drake Bennett, Bloomberg Businessweek “Written in a brash, engaging style, the book is also a philosophical inquiry into the nature of debt—where it came from and how it evolved.”—The New York Times Book Review “Fresh . . . fascinating . . . thought-provoking [and] exceedingly timely.”—Financial Times “The book is more readable and entertaining than I can indicate. . . . Graeber is a scholarly researcher, an activist and a public intellectual. His field is the whole history of social and economic transactions.”—Peter Carey, The Observer “One of the year’s most influential books. Graeber situates the emergence of credit within the rise of class society, the destruction of societies based on ‘webs of mutual commitment’ and the constantly implied threat of physical violence that lies behind all social relations based on money.”—Paul Mason, The Guardian “Part anthropological history and part provocative political argument, it’s a useful corrective to what passes for contemporary conversation about debt and the economy.”—Jesse Singal, The Boston Globe “Terrific . . . In the best anthropological tradition, he helps us reset our everyday ideas by exploring history and other civilizations, then boomeranging back to render our own world strange, and more open to change.”—Raj Patel, The Globe and Mail

The Taming of Democracy

Spanning the late 19th century and early 20th century, this volume seeks to introduce and understand the evolution of the modern Conservative party.

The Taming of Democracy

Spanning the late 19th century and early 20th century, this volume seeks to introduce and understand the evolution of the modern Conservative party. The central theme of the text is the adaptation of the Party within a political system based upon a mass, democratic, secular and urban society and a mature industrial economy undergoing the early strains of relative decline.

War and Democracy A Comparative Study of the Korean War and the Peloponnesian War

Rhetoric, Ideology, and the Power of the People (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1989); Harvey Yunis, Taming Democracy: Models of Political Rhetoric in ClassicalAthens (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1996). 21.

War and Democracy  A Comparative Study of the Korean War and the Peloponnesian War

A comparison of the cultural and political/institutional dimensions of war's impact on Greece during the Peloponnesian War, and the United States and the two Koreas, North and South, during the Korean War. It demonstrates the many underlying similarities between the two wars.

Democratic Decision Making

See Victor Hanson, “Our Western Mob,” National Review (April 14, 2003); A War Like No Other (New York: Random House, 2005), 5; Harvey Yunis, Taming Democracy (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1996), 43—46. Cf. Moses Finley, The Ancient ...

Democratic Decision Making

Democratic Decision-Making: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives contains eight essays by political scientists, all but one of them previously unpublished, addressing various aspects of the democratic decision-making process. The book consists of four parts, each consisting of two essays devoted to a common theme: democratic statesmanship, the extent to which limitations of the democratic principle of majority rule are desirable, the contemporary academic theory of “deliberative democracy,” and informal modes of democratic decision-making.