Tao and Dharma

Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda

Tao and Dharma

Tao and Dharma: Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda explores the enduring features of humanity's longest and continually practiced systems of medicine. These two indigenous healing arts arising independently in China and India communed and exchanged experience, techniques, and therapeutic substances over the epochs of their development. This book's interesting and valuable comparison provides a pioneer effort in examining side by side two great systems of medicine, studying closely the historical, theoretical and practical relationships.

Tao and Trinity: Notes on Self-Reference and the Unity of Opposites in Philosophy

Tao and Trinity: Notes on Self-Reference and the Unity of Opposites in Philosophy

The Chinese Tao and the Western Trinity have a fundamental unity of theme: the unity of opposites. Both are connected with problems as broad and diverse as how to describe the entire universe, how a system can talk about itself, the relationship between symbols and realities, and the nature of signs and sacraments.

Bringing Home the Dharma

Awakening Right Where You Are

Bringing Home the Dharma

If you want to find inner peace and wisdom, you don't need to move to an ashram or monastery. Your life, just as it is, is the perfect place to be. Jack Kornfield, one of America's most respected Buddhist teachers, shares this and other key lessons gleaned from more than forty years of committed study and practice. Topics include: • How to cultivate loving-kindness, compassion, joy, and equanimity • Conscious parenting • Spirituality and sexuality • The way of forgiveness • Committing ourselves to healing the suffering in the world Bringing Home the Dharma includes simple meditation practices for awakening our buddha nature—our wise and understanding heart—amid the ups and downs of our ordinary daily lives.

Tao-Sheng's Commentary on the Lotus Sutra

A Study and Translation

Tao-Sheng's Commentary on the Lotus Sutra

(Chu) Tao-sheng stands out in history as a unique and preeminent thinker whose paradigmatic, original ideas paved the way for the advent of Chinese Buddhism. The universality of Buddha-nature, which Tao-sheng championed at the cost of excommunication, was to become a cornerstone of the Chinese Buddhist ideology. This book presents a comprehensive study of the only complete document by Tao-sheng still in existence.

The World's Religions After September 11

The World's Religions After September 11

Horrible religious violence has marked the opening of the 21st century, but can the world's religions work together as a force for good? Dozens of experts in religion examine the meaning of religion in the aftermath of September 11 and answer this question.

Strategic Intuition

The Creative Spark in Human Achievement

Strategic Intuition

How "Aha!" really happens. When do you get your best ideas? You probably answer "At night," or "In the shower," or "Stuck in traffic." You get a flash of insight. Things come together in your mind. You connect the dots. You say to yourself, "Aha! I see what to do." Brain science now reveals how these flashes of insight happen. It's a special form of intuition. We call it strategic intuition, because it gives you an idea for action-a strategy. Brain science tells us there are three kinds of intuition: ordinary, expert, and strategic. Ordinary intuition is just a feeling, a gut instinct. Expert intuition is snap judgments, when you instantly recognize something familiar, the way a tennis pro knows where the ball will go from the arc and speed of the opponent's racket. (Malcolm Gladwell wrote about this kind of intuition in Blink.) The third kind, strategic intuition, is not a vague feeling, like ordinary intuition. Strategic intuition is a clear thought. And it's not fast, like expert intuition. It's slow. That flash of insight you had last night might solve a problem that's been on your mind for a month. And it doesn't happen in familiar situations, like a tennis match. Strategic intuition works in new situations. That's when you need it most. Everyone knows you need creative thinking, or entrepreneurial thinking, or innovative thinking, or strategic thinking to succeed in the modern world. All these kinds of thinking happen through flashes of insight strategic intuition. And now that we know how it works, you can learn to do it better. That's what this book is about. Over the past ten years, William Duggan has conducted pioneering research on strategic intuition and for the past three years has taught a popular course at Columbia Business School on the subject. He now gives us this eye-opening book that shows how strategic intuition lies at the heart of great achievements throughout human history: the scientific and computer revolutions, women's suffrage, the civil rights movement, modern art, microfinance in poor countries, and more. Considering the achievements of people and organizations, from Bill Gates to Google, Copernicus to Martin Luther King, Picasso to Patton, you'll never think the same way about strategy again. Three kinds of strategic ideas apply to human achievement: * Strategic analysis, where you study the situation you face * Strategic intuition, where you get a creative idea for what to do * Strategic planning, where you work out the details of how to do it. There is no shortage of books about strategic analysis and strategic planning. This new book by William Duggan is the first full treatment of strategic intuition. It's the missing piece of the strategy puzzle that makes essential reading for anyone interested in achieving more in any field of human endeavor.

Healing Presence

The Essence of Nursing, Second Edition

Healing Presence

Praise for the Previous Edition: "...represents an act of passion for the profession....The work's value comes from its integration of scientific, creative, and spiritual philosophies as a core context for the complex nurse-patient interaction involved in the promotion of a healing environment....Recommended." —Choice At the center of professional nursing lies the "authentic presence" of the nurse -- the intention and commitment that brings us to the profession, and unfolds as we develop as nurses. In this new edition, JoEllen Koerner explores the intersection of scientific, creative, and spiritual ways of knowing that inform and inspire this "healing presence" in caregiver and patient. Revised, updated, and refocused, the book integrates traditional nursing practice with cutting-edge alternative and integrative medicine. The author expands our' awareness of Allopathic and alternative ways of healing as rooted in Native Healing practices. The book also explores new models for transpersonal caring through the lens of philosophy, spirituality, and complexity science. It is a profoundly important resource for nurse educators, students, and practitioners. Key features: Presents the Nursing Triad model: nurse as scientist, artist, and healing presence Examines the bioenergetic body-the "five bodies" that comprise our being and infuse our becoming Discusses the physiology and philosophy behind healing presence Analyzes the healing process between nurse and patient, from embracing suffering to transcending polarities and enhancing capacity

The Supplicate Order

Invocation of the Sacred

The Supplicate Order

Supplication captures a universal, cross-cultural approach to spirituality. Authored by Dr. Patricia Brown, The Supplicate Order defines supplication as an expression for the laws and principles that guide a spiritual aspirant toward communion with the sacred (mysteries), progressing toward an expanded perception of life and grateful reception of blessings, positive creativity, healing, and wisdom. It shows how humanity bridges the manifest explicate order and the unmanifest implicate order. Offering a fresh perspective on supplication, The Supplicate Order carries four messages that pertain to spiritual aspirants at any level: Don’t abandon yourself (to self-loathing or to another person’s or group’s absolute power over you) Start with what you know to do (don’t be too eager to get exotic or far removed from your resonant spiritual persuasion) Never think you know everything Don’t give up Brown explains how key universal principles verify the human capacity to bring forth “gifts of the spirit,” while psychological health and development determine invocatory efforts and receptive capacities. The Supplicate Order integrates global spiritual wisdom and psychological knowledge with the trends of new science, highlighting the human invocation of the sacred.

Neomonism

Neomonism

Reality appears dualistic from a logical standpoint. Monism is the picking of one side of the issue as real and the other an illusion. Neomonism is the stance that the answer is not to be found in one or the other but in a nondualistic stance that is a paradoxical unity. I submit there is great confusion over the concept of one. There is the mathematical understanding of one as singular or exclusive and there is the metaphysical understanding of one as manifold or inclusive. Mathematical oneness comes from the language of the mind and metaphysical oneness comes from the language of the heart. This confusion is apparent when we talk about the oneness of -O- (My spelling of the word God.) as we assume a mathematical one that is separate while we are discussing a metaphysical one that is unity. It is true that -O- is one in the mathematical sense of the term, but it is also true that -O- is one in the metaphysical sense of the term. -O- is singular in that there is nothing but -O- and at the same time -O- is unity for the same reason. -O- is not a separate one nor separate manys for the one contains the many while the many contain the one. One of the biggest problems with using the mathematical concept when discussing Metaphysical issues is the idea of separate entities. -O- is separate from Nature. Man is separate from Nature. -O- is separate from Man. These separations are true only in a logical sense for one cannot separate one from the other in an existential sense. The Biblical and Science Literalists are equally hubristic by acting as if they have the authority speak for all of us on these issue of Science vs. Religion. It seems to me this is a false dichotomy with equally unreasonable choices. I find it somewhat amusing to listen to the arguments between the two camps as these people make idols out of images in their attempt to force all people to accept one or the other of the campfire stories as Truth. The Bibleist says only X is true while the Materialist says only Y is true and both fail to realize their respective images are irrelevant when it comes to Reality, which is at least A through Z. Perhaps the most hubristic is this assertion that in order to be considered a -O-image, the qualifier that it must be a being with volition and intent is included. To a Taoist, the concept of the Tao has the same function as the concept of God does to a Christian; why is one a -O-image and the other not? It does not follow that if some parts of one -O-image are shown to be mistaken from a Scientific P.O.V., that all -O-images are thereby invalid for the same reasons. Although they are two aspects of the same enterprise (the understanding of Reality), they occupy different functions in life. Religion is in the sphere of the Intuitive while Science is in the sphere of the Rational. This is why traditional monism misses the point; the One is not a choice between two sides of an issue. Unity is a Reality that encompasses Is and Is Not. We act as if our dictionary daffynitions are the only valid ones, which is certainly not the case, for neither the Biblical nor the Scietheistic images cover the entirety of the Reality. One does not have to give up the idea of -O- just because scientific evidence shows the universe to be self-generating. It seems a bit absurd to me that our Worldview be based on either one or the other when neither option fills the bill by itself. Neomonism questions the assumption of separateness as a fundamental truth. There may be a dichotomy between mind and matter, for example, but is the dichotomy logical or existential? Some take the stance of mind only as reality, some take the body only stance; each mistakes a logical paradox for an existential state of reality. Without body, as we understand it, we would not have mind, as we understand it. Mind only is a partial answer, body only is a partial answer. That any one particular answer is a partial answer does not mean it is a false answer, me

The Big Bang, the Buddha, and the Baby Boom

The Spiritual Experiments of My Generation

The Big Bang, the Buddha, and the Baby Boom

Some deep alternative current has begun flowing out of the spiritual adventures and identity struggles of recent generations. Of course, we didn't create the conditions or questions of this new age; we got caught in them. The ground shifted, the old gods departed, the economic and political utopias crumbled, and the traditional answers were washed away. We didn't leave home; home left us. How did a nice Jewish boy from Nebraska become a Buddhist in California? Join Wes "Scoop" Nisker as he takes us on a hilarious, wild ride from West to East and back again in his quest for true self and enlightenment. Combining the best elements of memoir and social commentary, Nisker uses his own story to illuminate the Baby Boomers' roots of spiritual hunger in postwar America. His journey begins in middle America (Nebraska to be exact) in the middle of the twentieth century, travels through the heyday of the Beats and the Hippies, the birth of the modern environmental movement, and winds up in the current epicenter of Buddhism in the West—California. Full of colorful and immediately recognizable figures of art, religion, and popular culture—from Alfred E. Newman to Allen Ginsberg—The Big Bang, the Buddha, and the Baby Boom is a guided tour of both the outer and inner move-ments that have culminated in the growing culture of Western Buddhism—a lasting, vivid picture of how the Baby Boom generation came to be identified with spiritual seeking, how they went about the search, what they have found and created, and what their true legacy is.